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By midlandsmovies, Nov 14 2018 02:49PM



Young filmmakers across the West Midlands team up and create their own opportunities


Young filmmakers in the West Midlands are creating their own opportunities as they work together under the name Gen.2 Creatives.


The group was founded in August 2017 by Luke Furmage, a young creative who graduated from BOA and the BFI Academy in Birmingham, after realising a want and need to create content among the young filmmakers and creatives in the West Midlands.


From workshops and masterclasses to festivals and competitions, Gen.2 Creatives main reason of existing is to be a safe environment for budding filmmakers from diverse backgrounds to practice and create film projects, while learning off each other and support one another by listing work opportunities.


With around 40 members of young creatives, they have worked on several projects, which have been uploaded online and played at the Flat Pack Festival 2018.


The group was also used as a part of the pitch for the Channel 4 bid, although it was not successful, they are working with other creatives in Birmingham, including established professionals, to create opportunities for young people. Three of the members were invited to a secret meeting, which took place on the 8th November, with names such as the Mayor of Birmingham Andy Street, Peaky Blinder screenwriter Steve Knight and many well-known media companies based in Birmingham.



Luke Furmage Founder and Director of Gen 2 adds, “Development and funding is only available for creatives that are already established in the industry, and Media courses, although teach students the tools of the trade, can often stifle creativity under the need to fulfil the criteria and complete exams".


"We want to develop a culture of creativity for a new generation of young creatives in the creative industry here in Birmingham. This new Online Generation has the unlimited potential for exciting new content that will shape the years to come", he goes on to say.


During one of their projects known as ‘12 Hours Till Wrap’ in which they create and edit a film in 12 hours, a few of the members explained why they joined Gen.2 Creatives.


William Terry-Wright, 18-years-old who was the Director of the most recent project, said, “It’s sounded like a great opportunity to network with young filmmakers and people with similar ambitions to mine, and it also sounded like a good opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in terms of filmmaking.”


Jordon Wolf, an 18-years-old aspiring actress who starred as the lead in the short films, said, “It’s very helpful to me because it’s something I want to go into in the future and it’s a great opportunity to get more experience.”


The self-sustaining group is starting to expand with talk of a partnership with The Producers’ Forum and possible connections with the BFI but are always looking to expand their network.


They have their first public 12 Hours Till Wrap event taking place 1st of December.


To find out more about the team, how to join, you can find them online on their website and Facebook page.


Fahima Khatun


By midlandsmovies, May 28 2018 07:59AM



Midlands Spotlight - Birmingham Creatives Ready for Hire


Midlands Movies finds out about Talent Connect which is a new initiative bringing twelve fresh faces to Birmingham’s creative industry. It is the first time a scheme like this has been piloted, with a drive to help enable new talent to enter into the film sector as freelancers.


A group of 18 to 25-year-olds with an array of talents are to become available for projects that need immediate hiring with each participant having an online profile.


Once registered on their website, employers can access these profiles where they can choose a participant which fits their requirements and contact them directly. The skills of this talent pool are camera operation, camera assisting, editing, hair and make-up, lighting assistant, graphic design, scriptwriting, locations, administration, social media, web development and more.


Contracts are set up between the company and the participant, who have all set up as self-employed and Talent Connect contacted Michael Ford of Infinite Wisdom for his thoughts. “I would definitely look at this platform if I needed new freelancers, having already recruited similar talent through the Producers’ Forum in recent months".


Much like the Creative England Crew Database, the difference between them is that this forum screens its members which is a huge selling point for Michael.


Talent Connect has been created by The Producers’ Forum and Creative Alliance with the support of Creative Skillset’s Film Skills Fund, with BFI’s Film Forever National Lottery funds. Creative Skillset is the industry skills body for the Creative Industries.


The Producers’ Forum is an independent organisation serving the vibrant community of filmmakers and content producers region. Membership includes producers, writers, and directors and many others involved in other aspects of film & TV.


The Forum provides training, networking, and lobbying. In an industry currently undergoing profound changes, it provides a unified lobbying voice through developing strategic relationships with key partners such as Creative Skillset, Film Birmingham, Creative Alliance, and West Midlands Screen Bureau.


Creative Alliance, founded in 2005, was one of the first training providers in the UK to offer apprenticeships in the Creative and Cultural Industry, an industry with no previous history of apprenticeships.


For more information check out https://talentconnect.creativealliance.org.uk



Talent Connect member Fahima Khatun
Talent Connect member Fahima Khatun

By midlandsmovies, Apr 27 2018 09:40PM



Midlands Spotlight - Finham Park Film Festival


Midlands Movies comes across new regional film festival based in Coventry that has big aspirations with a whole host of up and coming filmmakers.


The Finham Park Film Festival 2018 may be a small film festival but had its beginnings when Mike Gunn Head of Media Arts first started teaching Film Studies at Finham Park in Warwickshire. He encouraged students to have the highest expectations and with many of them entering their projects to local film competitions, it was of no surprise when the students soon started winning.


Later, talented students began entering national competitions and within just the last four years, Finham Park students have had five student films nominated for national prizes, including their first winner last year, Jack Brazil, now in Year 12.


Based in Coventry, thus originated their own film festival. Known for its outstanding film work, their media department have been hosting, serving and demonstrating the work produced. A fully catered, 3 meal, sit-down event is the icing on the movie cake where Andrew Hartshorn, the Head of Food Technology got students cooking Michelin-starred food to 72 guests at the festival.


The school use the festival to showcase fantastic films as well as show the wider community just how much potential they have. They want to inspire the next generation of students to even higher goals and make the school a centre of film-making excellence.


At last year’s festival, the festival helped ignite the Coventry 2021 bid for City of Culture and only eight months later, Coventry won, bringing even greater attention to the city’s young filmmakers.


This year’s festival prizes will be judged by a panel of judges from the film industry including ITV producer Anna Andrews and Ali Bannister, who worked on Steven Spielberg’s War Horse. Sean Hartofilis, an independent New York film-maker will be less known but Josic Cadoret’s work funding new talent at BFI Film London will become more prominent now he has been announced as one of the six regional talent executives by the BFI.


Students nominated for awards are looking forward to hearing from their heroes and getting tips on how to be at the forefront of Coventry’s 2021 City of Culture festivities.


If you’d like to know more about the school or the festival check out https://twitter.com/FinhamFilm



By midlandsmovies, Dec 5 2017 06:12PM



Random Acts and Rural Media - Part 3


In our third and final part we cover 4 more filmmakers who are part of the region’s Random Acts and Rural Media partnership. From all across the Midlands, please read below to find out more of the young talent the area has to offer.


For the previous blogs - Part 1 please click here and for Part 2 please click here.


Body Language (Nottinghamshire)

Michael Mante’s film shows a krump dancer performing amidst the ills, filth and degradation of his urban environment in a surreal art exploration of gentrification, classism and racism. Michael is an aspiring filmmaker, both directing films and writing screenplays with his creative ambition to use film to speak to audiences, ask them questions, and encourage viewers to ask themselves questions. Michael adds, “Visual literacy is the world's most poignant language and I try to use that to communicate the things I see in everyday life.”





Everyday Choreography (Shropshire)

Everyday Choreography is a charming short dance film by Caldonia Walton following Gerrard, an overworked 45-year old man on his way home from a tiring day at the office. He puts his headphones in to forget about his worries and finds himself amongst amusing interactions with two people who alter his outlook on life. Caldonia is a 23-year old dance performer and choreographer from Shropshire who creates dance work that links with theatre, text and film, using clear narratives about the world we live in realised through physical movement and a touch of comedy.




Yellow Wallpaper (Warwickshire)

Inspired by the short story ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’ by Charlotte Gilman(1892), this short film from Hayley Egan uses dance to portray the claustrophobic and cruel consequences of how ‘rest cure’ kept 19th century women compliant, which resulted in an increase in mental health problems and feelings of confinement and frustration. Through dance movement, our female protagonist will find solace in the yellow wallpaper, yet is driven to exhaustion by her frustrating predicament. Hayley Egan is young filmmaker/producer from Coventry now working in London.




Taking Up Space (Staffordshire)

Emily Mulenga’s animation covers the notion that time and space in the art world and academia are not often dedicated regularly to people of colour, most notably women. Emily grows to Godzilla proportions and takes over the city in this thoughtful short from this young talented visual artist from the West Midlands.









By midlandsmovies, Dec 2 2017 09:46AM



Random Acts and Rural Media - Part 2


We take another look at a selection of young filmmakers from across the East and West Midlands who have been involved in the Random Acts/Rural Media programme in the region. Please check out the talented filmmakers and their films below.


To read more about other filmmakers from the programme please check out Part 1 of our showcase here.





The Legend of Rawry (Herefordshire)

A fantasy drawing animation based on the Michael Bailon’s own drawings, this short focuses on dragons and more. Introduced by Michael himself who has autism, the filmmaker is a young artist who is from the ASD community. AT just 17 years old Michael’s inspiration includes Pixar, Manga, Marvel and of course himself.





Dancer of the Future (Herefordshire)

Made by Anna Campbell her film focuses on pole-dancing which only recently has become a fitness phenomenon which celebrates the aspects of women which have historically been repressed: strength and sexuality. Anna says that “Pole represents a shift in how women view their bodies: from the aesthetic to the functional. The extent to which women will cripple themselves in order to exaggerate feminine beauty can be seen in footwear. Pole dancers now are barefoot, as utility becomes more important than image; pole is about what the body can do, not how it looks”. Anna Campbell is a creative writing student with a passion for filmmaking and pole-dancing.



Impact (Worcestershire)

"Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is most commonly associated with veterans of war, however, many diagnosed with PTSD are affected through other traumas. This short drama by Eleanor Smart explores the stigma surrounding PTSD. Elle is a graduate from University of Worcester and has a degree in Digital Film Production & Screen Writing.



Super Citrus Force (Leicestershire)

Filmmaker Laurence Maybury creates a crime-fighting duo who have to stop an evil villain from objectifying women... LITERALLY! The film is a combination of British surrealist comedy and Japanese special effects from the 24 year-old filmmaker who has a degree in media production and has been making short films since he was just 16.



Oblivion (Lincolnshire)

This animation from Sarah Worcester is a first person POV film that allows the viewer to feel like they are inside the trapped world of someone who is suffering with a mental illness. The young animator from Lincolnshire is influenced by Florence & the Machine and has found her Random Acts experience “artistically exciting and challenging”.












By midlandsmovies, Nov 27 2017 08:23PM



RANDOM ACTS & RURAL MEDIA (PART 1)


In a new 3-part series Midlands Movies will be showcasing a selection of films and filmmakers from the region who have been involved in the national Random Acts programme.


Random Acts is a collaboration between Arts Council England and Channel 4. The short films (from just 90 seconds to 3 minutes long) have been described as ‘bold expressions of creativity’ with each one being individually engaging, experimental and quirky.


For the last 3 years, local organisation Rural Media (click here) has been working with young artists and filmmakers right across the Midlands to create ‘First Acts’. And Midlands Movies will be focusing on a selection of these fantastic films created by local artists right here on the site.


This Movement is Silent (Birmingham)

This spoken word film is from Paul Stringer who has made a film covering the journey of an open mic performer from chair to stage through a crowded, passionate and engaged poetry audience. This is edited alongside a journey throughout Birmingham, past its great landmarks in a bid to show that the local poetry scene is not only the people performing the poetry, but the whole collective community as a whole. Watch his film below:





Re-Code (Birmingham)

Made by Sipho Dube, Re-Code is a dance film exploring themes of dyslexia and empowerment. Sipho is a spoken word artist and dancer and as someone who has both dyslexia and with a profound stutter, Sipho has overcome issues through the use of spoken word. Watch this thought-provoking film below:



One Rogue Santa (Kidderminster)

Another spoken word film, Steven Williams’ short is an account of a troubled home life that led to various stints in and out prison. Through stylised silhouetted sequences, Steve’s story explores the complexities of growing up without a support network and having to deal with the choices we make. Now aged 24, Steven has been homeless from the age of 18 and has been in out of prison 4 times. Yet now with two children he’s looking to become a better role model and is working towards becoming a social worker to help other young people avoid making the same mistakes. Watch Steven’s video here:



Meet Cute (Northamptonshire)

Chris Cosentino has created an animation/live-action crossover comedy where a conspiracy nut shares a "meet cute" with a nice girl but discovers he's actually a fictional character in a short film. View the short here:



Dirty Re-Birth (Derbyshire)

Joey Mottershead explores the part of the human condition where we are required to perpetually reinvent ourselves, to grow and evolve to new forms. “The reality is these moments happen in the darkest of places, where directions have no meaning and internal struggles amount to the psyche being ripped apart”. Joey is a live interdisciplinary performance artist based by in the East Midlands whose work explores gender politics, the human condition and the empowerment of the self. “I take inspiration from the beautiful aspects of the grotesque”, says Joey, “finding light in the shadows and portraying the particular strain of glory only found within sadness”. Watch the film here:









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