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By midlandsmovies, Sep 14 2017 11:14AM



Flickerama - A film festival, that's an actual festival!


Flickerama is taking film festivals to a whole new level, bringing the vibe of a summer outdoor festival and making it all about movies. Think a mini-Glastonbury that's all about film. 


Regional film fans will be able to enjoy films on a large outdoor Arena Screen or in the comfort of a specially designed indoor marquee with three fantastic film events taking place over one weekend.


Over 15th, 16th & 17th September you can head to Umberslade Farm Park, just 30 minutes from Birmingham and be "transported to a film paradise".


With three unique events over the three days, there are indoor and outdoor screenings (with rain protection!), 16 classic films, two Labyrinth Masquerade Balls, Harry Potter After Party with Alex Baker (Magic Radio/Kerrang), a Quidditch Tournament and more!


There will also be the Ghostbusters car, a Kids Make & Take Craft Tent, Kids & Adult Cosplay (win a private cinema screening!), a Back To The Future Exhibition, Film Poster Sale, Conjurer's Kitchen, Kids outdoor games.


And that's not all! Other attractions are the Big Grey circus performer, Film themed Mini-Golf, Forza 6 Hotlap Tournament, Minecraft Creative competition. Phew!

 

The organiser's claim there is "something for everyone" and boy are they right!


For further info please click here http://flickerama.co.uk and check the film screening listings below:


FLICKERAMA - LABYRINTH MASQUERADE BALL:

15th September - DOORS OPEN 7PM

7.30pm Themed cocktail reception

8.30pm Labyrinth (U)

10.30pm Labyrinth Masquerade Ball


FLICKERAMA - CULT AND COMIC DAY:

Saturday 16th September - DOORS OPEN 11.30AM

OUTDOOR SCREEN

12.15pm Guardians Of The Galaxy(12A)

2.45pm Edward Scissorhands (12A) 100 mins

5.15pm Ghostbusters (12A) 103 mins

8pm Harry Potter & The Philosopher's Stone (PG) 150 mins


INDOOR SCREEN

12.30 Adam West Tribute - Batman: The Movie 1966 (U) 103 mins

3pm Amaryllis (15) TBC mins

5:30pm Deadpool (15) 104 mins

7:15pm Adult cosplay competition

8:30pm The Room (18) 99 mins


FLICKERAMA - FAMILY FILM DAY:

Sunday 17th September - DOORS OPEN 11.30AM

OUTDOOR SCREEN

12.30pm Safety Last (U) 76 mins

2pm Frozen singalong (PG) 108 mins

4.15pm Kids cosplay competition

4.45pm The Goonies (12A) 113 mins

7pm Back to the Future (PG) 115 mins


INDOOR SCREEN

12.45pm The Lego Batman Movie (1h 45m)

3pm Matilda (PG) 94 mins

5pm Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory (U) 96 mins

7.30pm Labyrinth (U) 98 mins

By midlandsmovies, Jul 14 2017 07:46AM



Wonder Woman (2017) Dir. Patty Jenkins

Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) Dir. Jon Watts


Huge superhero franchises are just a thing now. They can be as exciting as a rollercoaster. Or like bad breath, an immediate turn-off. However, in many cases, they sit comfortably like a nice warm cuppa in the summer blockbuster season. Neither a die-hard Marvel or DC fan – like most I just simply enjoy a good film – the two behemoths of the comic (now film) world have released key movies in their complicated production schedule.


After the solid Man of Steel, the abysmal Batman Vs Superman and the misstep of Suicide Squad, DC really needed a hit in order to regain some of the credibility lost from those less-than-satisfying tent-poles. So they’ve taken a chance (which should be hugely applauded) and given Gal Godot the long overdue central role of the infamous female superhero. After 14 films, Marvel STILL haven’t given any woman in their universe a film. Although Brie Larson as Captain Marvel is due soon, Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) is notably absent from Marvel’s solo film roster.


In short, the narrative shows Wonder Woman (Diana Price) jumping from Themyscira, the island home of an Amazon race of warrior women, to 1918 Europe during the height of the Great War. On her way she saves Chris Pine’s soldier Steve Trevor on her journey to destroy Ares, the god of war, who she believes is the cause of the conflict.


A fresh fish-out-of-water story, the film contains so much of what was missing from DC films so far – humanity, sensitivity, comedy and some characters with motivations you can get behind. Going for simplicity hugely helps the story and director Jenkins (her first film since Monster 14 years ago!) should be massively applauded for ditching the dourness and injecting some overdue fun. At the half way point, as ludicrous as Wonder Woman wearing her full costume in No Man’s Land is, the film already has its tone clearly defined and the audience swept along in its entertainment.


If there was a fault it would be two – albeit small. Firstly, the film suffers from the fact Marvel’s Captain America did the ‘hero in war’ film already so similarities are sadly inevitable. The second is the final battle which has flames (orange) and energy beams (teale) in the obligatory let’s smash everything up mess. Scarily reminiscent of BvS, my eyes rolled at the familiar imagery, which is confusingly edited, and contains the usual over-use of CGI where nothing has much weight. However, more on this later.


Moving on, yet still speaking of the familiar, Marvel has released its new version of the infamous web-slinger. One of the hottest properties out there – maybe only second to Batman and Superman as the most famous superhero (?) – they have done a deal with franchise-owning Sony to finally add Peter Parker to the ever-expanding MCU. His brief appearance in Civil War was a great introduction but with 3 cinematic iterations of the character in just 10 years, can something fresh be brought to the screen?


Well, in the majority, it’s a massive yes! Tom Holland is a hugely likeable Peter Parker and Marvel wisely ditches an origin story (the fact he was bitten by a spider is briefly mentioned once) and focuses on the teenager’s school problems alongside his goals to become an Avenger. Under the tutelage of Tony Stark he’s given the responsibility of a super suit which he struggles to contain in his eagerness to progress. Peter’s ambition jumps from defending the neighbourhood to attempting to stop Michael Keaton’s ‘Vulture’, who is selling alien weaponary he has stolen from previous Avengers’ encounters.


Tying nicely into the MCU but setting out its own individual story, Homecoming (surprisingly) brings enough to the plate to set it aside from the Garfield and Maguire versions. The teen angst is superbly handled, an action sequence atop the Washington Monument was phenomenal (go see this in 3-D and really feel the vertigo) and its jokes come so thick and fast the film veers from superhero action flick to outright pure comedy.


Keaton, who I’ve loved since Batman ’89 (my personal favourite superhero film) is so watchable here he’s already jumped to a close second, behind just Loki, as one of the best MCU villains to date – an area Marvel has been under-achieving at best.


Strangely, its biggest flaw is almost the same as Wonder Woman’s. A final battle sees the Vulture – with flames in the background (orange) – take on Spidey using his damaged mechanical wings (both teale) and here we are again. In a film taking lots of chances, it was a sequence that could have done with a shot of more unique web-slinging action and originality.


That aside, Spider-Man’s first full film in the Marvel world was certainly a surprising success. Was it better than Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 2? Personally, I think not. Raimi’s unique directorial style and more interesting villain still holds firm but Marvel went VERY close to reassessing its pole position.


Both films then prove to be hugely satisfying and have course-corrected their respective franchises as needed. Both are surprising in all the best ways – Wonder Woman’s feminine focus and more subtle story shows DC can get audiences emotionally involved and Spider-Man proves that Marvel can bring something new and fresh to an over-exposed character. Super!


7.5/10 Wonder Woman


8/10 Spider-Man: Homecoming


Midlands Movies Mike

By midlandsmovies, Jun 6 2017 04:26PM


Local filmmaker ready to take you to another world


With the release of Marvel’s Spider-Man: Homecoming in the Summer of 2017, interest in the web-slinging superhero is at an all-time high. After a deal that saw Spidey enter the MCU from a property owned by Sony, fans are anticipating a great first adventure during the blockbuster season.


However, the biggest fan might just be right here in the Midlands as Leicester filmmaker Joey Lever is set to launch his own fan-film based around the infamous New Yorker. Now we’re “tingling” with excitement, we swing by to find out more about the ambitious production.


In early 2017, Joey Lever won a Midlands Movies Award for his sound mixing work on his film Paper Plane which began a successful start to a year that looks set to explode for the local filmmaker.


His new superhero fan film is Spider-Man: Another World and it is in fact part of a larger shared universe he has created with fellow fans. Taking an idea from Marvel themselves, Lever has named it "The strand of web, web series" which includes 3 films and one short.


DiGitiLhEaRt & PavillionArts are the studios who have invested in his vision and Joey’s new project has also seen him working with many of the region’s most talented creatives, including Gatling Gun Productions who also hail from Leicestershire.


With the trailer just launched in June (see YouTube video above) Joey Lever says “We are so excited to hear what [fans] think about it as this been such an amazing experience to step back into the shoes of Peter Parker. This time trying to make a fan film that is different and we are so proud of the outcome”.


Also supporting the production is comic book artist Marc Ducrow who has designed the film’s poster.



Updating via the movie's Facebook page, Joey goes on to add, “As a child I was always fascinated by the idea to tell stories in different ways. I spent many years growing up drawing, acting out little sequences I thought up before bedtime. This blossomed into my love of film making. Every film you see of mine will be made with my heart and soul”.

Based in Leicester, Joey is a self-taught freelance filmmaker & cinematographer and has been lucky enough to work internationally on projects in the USA, South America, Australia and Germany


As well as writing and directing Lever himself stars in the action-drama alongside talented local actors Craig Ellis, Teravis Ward, Andrew Miles, Charlie V and Jordan Schofield.


We'll be keeping a close eye on the film's development as it comes to launch and follow the movie's updates on the official pages below.

https://www.facebook.com/SpiderManLC


http://www.joeylever.com

By midlandsmovies, May 31 2017 08:58AM



Split (2017) Dir. M. Night Shyamalan


Split begins when a group of regular teenage girls are abducted by James McAvoy’s creepy stalker “Dennis” and detained against their will in a location unknown. With Shyamalan’s penchant for dark twisty thrillers, we find all is not what it seems and soon uncover the man is merely one of 23 different personalities that inhabit his body.


These characters range from the old and the young and even women and it’s to McAvoy’s talents that he can pull off such a role. He mostly omits any subtlety but is clearly having huge amounts of fun with each extreme incarnation.


Shyamalan keeps us guessing as to what the true nature of this person is as the girls try everything from escape plans to befriending “Hedwig”, one of the younger personalities, in order to get out of their locked rooms. The Witch’s Anya Taylor-Joy excels as the leading girl and along with this and the Ridley Scott produced ‘Morgan’, the actress is carving quite a career in spookily dark thrillers that go beyond the natural.


With this absurd premise, the filmmaker doesn’t try too much to take the audience down the route of an accurate medical depiction – quite the opposite in fact – and he mostly keeps the transitions between each of them off screen. This keeps the stakes high as we’re never sure as to which one may re-enter the room and which of them knows information the others don't.


But this being a Shyamalan film we must talk about his inevitable favourite trick of the trade. As the film hits its emotional summit, he rounds the story off with a sense that supernatural forces may actually be a part of the kidnappers psyche but he keeps it ambiguous almost until the end.


[SPOILERS]


And it is the end that is most surprising. McAvoy’s character has a supervillain vibe about him with mental (and then a physical manifestation of) powers that go beyond the real-life affliction he is suffering from. Here I felt Shyamalan had jumped the shark as I was enjoying the authentic world created. Yet, in a world full of spoilers, trailers that give away too much and news sites covering every minutiae of productions, Shyamalan manages one of his best hoodwinks yet.


In a lingering last shot we hear a journalist report on the events and comparing them to a similar villainous occurrence involving one “Mr. Glass”. And then David Dunn (Bruce Willis) appears. That’s right folks. It’s an Unbreakable sequel. Blimey!


With this and The Visit, Shyamalan has returned to his roots and gone someway, at the least, to prove his directing capabilities after misfires like The Happening and After Earth.


I was enjoying the film on its own terms but the director’s cherry expands the universe of his much beloved super-hero second film and the fact he had kept it under wraps (with another studio no less!) should be commended. It helped an already tightly wound morbid tale of mental woe conclude in a way that linked its real-life terrors with a mystical mystery that is hopefully expanded upon further.


7.5/10


Midlands Movies Mike


By midlandsmovies, May 8 2017 09:04AM



Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) Dir. James Gunn


After the huge success of the first film, writer-director James Gunn returns to the vibrant day-glow world of Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) and his eclectic gang for this sequel in the never-ending Marvel franchise.


One of its positives is perhaps its lack of connection to the shared Marvel cinematic universe allowing for (aside from few post-credit scenes) a focus on its own story rather than setting up future characters and films with a set of unfulfilling cliff-hangers.


Here the superhero film focuses on the Guardians crew who are now mercenaries for hire of sorts and after defeating a large squid in a superb one-take musical opening, meet with a golden race called the Sovereign. Their reward for their job is Gamora’s sister Nebula (Zoe Saldana and Karen Gillan respectively) but they are soon on the run after Rocket Racoon (voiced brilliantly still by Bradley Cooper) steals valuable batteries from them.


After being chased, the group split with Peter, Gamora and Drax ending up on a sentient planet created by Peter’s God-like father Ego (Kurt Russell) whilst Rocket and Vin Diesel’s (baby) Groot cross paths with Michael Rooker’s superb Yondu who is in trouble with his own mutinous clan.


GOTG Vol. 2 is a fresh, superb sequel that delves deeper into these characters established in the original and each distinct personality has their own unique narrative arc. Gunn has done a great job with a multi-character script with a few pop-culture references (TV’s Knightrider is brilliantly given a nod) which do not muddy the deeper themes. Gunn uses serious drama, stories of revenge and love and a father-son dynamic to create conflict in a lesson to all budding scriptwriters. Yet, none of it feels like a surface gesture.


Drax’s “literal” laughter develops into more understanding of his bluntness whilst fun jokes, such as the ones at the expense of the strangely named Taserface, sit perfectly with parental quarrels and inter-team tensions.


The film never once felt slow or dragged out and is edited to within an inch of its life letting the audience know exactly where everyone is and what their motivations are. This is without losing the crucial essence of the characters. Rogue One this isn’t and thank goodness for that.


Given the film’s sensitive subject matter to me after my own recent loss of a parent, the ideas and excellent delivery of them by Gunn hit an emotional core that may be beyond the casual viewer. However, that’s not to say others will not find an emotional resonance with the superbly played out poignancy of the film’s conclusion – where I admit a tear of two was shed.


Dave Bautista as Drax rounds out the first-rate acting on show and I would go as far to say that the film could be even better than the first. Like Raimi’s Spider-Man 2, the film jumps straight into the drama without the need for the “origin story” and delves deeper into each character and their universe akin to classic sci-fi follow up Empire Strikes Back.


With enough new elements added, as well as the obligatory 70s soundtrack which is incorporated well into the story, GOTG Vol. 2 is an exceptional feat. The film could be the best-looking Marvel film to date with its eye-popping colour palette and with outstanding costumes, make-up and special effects scenes will satisfy the action fans. However, for me it showed that if you care about your leads then these are hugely heightened. Yet the film’s best asset is Gunn himself who delivers the whole package needed in a summer blockbuster and it is he who is the Guardian of his own gorgeous galaxy.


9/10


Midlands Movies Mike

By midlandsmovies, Apr 10 2017 11:00AM



Birmingham production company Rotunda Films feels the UK deserves its own superheroes as it launches a new crowd-funding campaign to create a series of films featuring a unique range of characters.


A group of West Midlands creatives are coming together to launch a new selection of local superheroes in their own shared universe.


Taking the Marvel and DC template, the filmmakers are specifically looking to focus their efforts on the UK, taking on the American-centric shows on Netflix. And with the team they have put together they feel British superhero fans are long overdue and simply “deserve to have their own heroes”.


They are starting this ambitious project with their film Mystic Highway, where they will be creating the first characters in this exciting new world.


Along the way audiences will be eventually introduced to a variety of characters as well. These heroes include ‘Spitfire’ (who is a symbol of the British resolve to stand against the odds) and ‘Vesta’ who does not consider herself a hero but does what any loving parent would do to protect those she loves.


Also in their plans are the female Code-X, a former military-trained special forces operative with few words and The Father, who oversees the missions, guiding the heroes in the right direction. There is rogue element Blu Silver and finally there is Myst, the demon hunter.


As the project gets underway, contributors will receive first access to the films VOD services and there’s scope for backers to be part of this world and appear in one of the adventures and even get a chance t be made into their very own action figure!


As with all low budget films, the creators are raising funds for general costs as well as special effects and props for their production.


With a 10 day shoot scheduled for later in 2017, Rotunda Films say that, “this is merely the beginning and we are hoping to use the first film as a proof on concept for the rest of the project”.


Follow their project at Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/uksuperhero as well as watching the video above for more information


Rotunda Films official sites:

http://www.rotundafilms.com

https://twitter.com/rotundafilms





By midlandsmovies, Nov 13 2016 10:01AM

Our third entry in our series of 2016 movie catch up blogs reviews even more films that we’ve seen over the year so far…


The Conjuring 2 (2016) Dir. James Wan

A sequel to the original 2013 film, The Conjuring 2 is another entry in the recent family friendly horror genre with Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga returning to investigate paranormal events. I enjoyed the new location as the film jumps to 1970s England and the possession scenes in the suburban house have some edginess yet the film doesn’t stray far from a well-worn template. Sadly like the last film, when they start “dimension-hopping” into visions I simply lose all interest. Of course, these days you can’t just have a solid horror. You have to have a FRANCHISE. SHARED UNIVERSE. EXPANSION. WORLD BUILDING! *does a giant ghostly yawn* With the “franchise” already having one spin off in the form of Annabelle (2014) – which itself is getting a 2017 sequel – and now plans for ‘The Nun’, The Conjuring and its ilk have had a big impact on modern US horror but that’s not exactly a good thing in my eyes. A solid entry in a solid set of films, American horror does not get more average than this 6/10

The Shallows (2016) Dir. Jaume Collet-Serra

A superb Blake Lively stars in this thrilling shark story where an injured surfer is marooned on some rocks at sea as a Great White attempts to attack. Just a few hundred yards from shore, the simple set up has Lively’s resourceful adventurer overcoming the bleeding from her leg, her lack of mobile phone and her isolation on the coast. By timing the shark’s behaviour, Lively has to outwit the brute in a race against time and the film grabs you by the jaws and doesn’t let go. Amongst the background of a trite “finding yourself” family drama bookend, the film mostly avoids this brief bout of sentimentality for a calculating set of action scenes pitting woman against beast. From flare guns to jellyfish via Steven “Seagull”, a few ropey CGI moments of the shark doesn’t distract from a fun b-movie genre flick with a little more bite than most with a great central performance anchoring the whole film. 6.5/10


Suicide Squad (2016) Dir. David Ayer

Oh my! With a phenomenal trailer, DC couldn’t have made a worse decision by getting the marketing team to re-cut Ayer’s film and they’ve ended up with an epic mess that merely hints on what could have been. Unlike BvS which was simply depressing, Suicide Squad attempts more fun but is let down by atrocious editing and an ENDLESS pop-music soundtrack that annoys throughout. Within the first 30 minutes, there must have been a dozen or so chart hits drowning out any drama and turning the exciting premise into an MTV-esque aural and visual disaster. Characters are introduced and then thrown away quickly as the film attempts (poorly) to show how a set of villains are brought together to save the world. The good parts including Wil Smith, a Batman cameo, Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn and Viola Davis’ government official are overshadowed by such clichéd nonsense as ANOTHER giant beam of light about to destroy a city, awful editing and flimsy characters. What should have been a fun Ocean’s Eleven style crime get-together becomes a chore where Leto’s much lauded Joker performance is cut to a few scenes and somewhere amongst all this rubble is a fine film aching to be re-assembled. Although I am sure they have the footage, it no doubt didn’t match the trailer’s “jokey” premise so was jettisoned much to its detriment, therefore making audiences feel like they are watching a 2-hour trailer for a film that isn’t subsequently delivered. 5.5/10


Mascots (2016) Dir. Christopher Guest

This new Netflix production follows Guests’ previous mockumentaries as a comedy featuring improvisational actors and Guest-regulars willing to make a fool of themselves in giant rubber costumes. Jane Lynch, Parker Posey, Fred Willard, Ed Begley, Jr., Christopher Moynihan, Don Lake and a whole ensemble of actors play both the organisers and the sports mascots themselves as they compete for the World Mascot Association championship's Gold Fluffy Award. Zach Woods as put-upon husband Mike Murray was a particular highlight as was the IT Crowd’s Chris O'Dowd as a violent ice hockey foam ‘fist’. Guest’s own cameo fell slightly flat as an effeminate self help guru. Fred Willard either makes up, or gets given, the best comedic lines and it’s a shame the film doesn’t match the director’s previous efforts as the comedy seems subtle to the point of being sparse. A fun little distraction, Mascots may provide some laughs and is certainly recommended to fans of Guest’s earlier films. It is however a great premise that delivers only a good film which is a shame given the talent involved. 7/10


Don’t Breathe (2016) Dir. Fede Alvarez

Along with Suicide Squad, Don’t Breathe had one of the trailers of the summer which promised a horror thriller telling how a group of teenage burglars pick the wrong house one night as a blind army-veteran traps them inside. Cutting to the chase this is the quintessential film of two halves. The first grounds the film in a very real (if heightened) world where 3 characters have their own motivations for getting involved in the wrong doings. After their heist goes awry, the tension builds as the owner (played brilliantly by Avatar’s Stephen Lang) locks the doors and secures the alarms and windows as the “innocent” teens attempt to escape his clutches. But from here it goes downhill fast. Much like Knock Knock (review here) the characters begin to make stupid decision after stupid decision, undermining their meticulous planning shown at the start. With silly choices comes a surprise twist in the blind man’s basement and the film’s ludicrousness completely lost me. From escaping a dog, to simply making excessive noise the leads’ ability to think even slightly rationally/logically was completely absent and I haven’t been annoyed by characters since Keanu Reeves’ stupid protagonist from the aforementioned film. A huge disappointment in terms of expectations, it may make my worst films of the year given its descent from excellence to rubbish in a mere 15 minutes during the movie’s middle section. 4.5/10


Nerve (2016) Dir. Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman

Adapted from the 2012 novel, Nerve is a techno-teen drama as adolescents play an online truth or dare game where “players” can make money by completing increasingly dangerous challenges. At the same time, a throng of “watchers” can log in to the game to view the live streams from the players themselves. An analogy of modern online pressures young people face on a daily basis the film features a great turn from young actress Emma Roberts who, as the shy unpopular girl at school, is drawn to the game to ‘prove’ to her friends she has what it takes. After completing several dares, her exposure increases as she gains more watchers after crossing paths with rough-and-ready James Franco. Mixing online and real-life personas the film is a surprisingly mature take on the issues of privacy, peer pressure, law breaking and celebrity and lays those themes over fun, exciting and innovative action scenes to show the risky dares themselves. A ladder walk between buildings, a blind motorcycle ride and a semi-naked department store chase being the highlights of these. The film falters at its conclusion with an over-the-top finale in an arena and a Running Man/Enemy of the State technical takedown stretching the believability but providing the required kid-friendly exciting conclusion. Without breaking new barriers, Nerve doesn’t patronise its teen audience and supplies a dash of thought-provoking topical issues a contemporary audience can relate to during a swift on-the-run thriller. 7/10


Midlands Movies Mike

By midlandsmovies, Nov 3 2016 04:12PM

Dr. Strange (2016) DIr. Scott Derrickson


A former neurosurgeon embarks upon a journey of self-healing only to find himself drawn into a world of mysterious arts.


Successful neurosurgeon Dr. Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) falls apart after a tragic car accident leaves him unable to continue with his work. In denial, he pushes for a number of pioneering treatments in order to regain full use of his hands, however when reality hits him that he will never operate again, he begins to look at somewhat alternative methods. After arriving at a location in Nepal, he is introduced to The Ancient One (Tilda Swinton) who informs him that he must set aside all ego and learn the secrets of a mystic world and alternative dimensions. However, before long, Strange finds himself as an intermediary between the real world and everything beyond this - something that is slightly more than he bargained for...


So, my birthday present from my best friend came in the form of a cinema trip to see the latest edition to Marvel's Cinematic Universe, Doctor Strange. Quite a good birthday present I must say, even if it wasn't quite in line with what we had expected.


Straight off the bat, it has to be said that Benedict Cumberbatch's performance was rather wonderful. He, of course, played the film's title character, and was every bit as impressive as some of the dimension-defying abilities Strange eventually possessed. Despite not being the most instantly likeable character, Cumberbatch did provide him with a certain charm that did well to win the viewer round.


With every hero, there must come a villain, and that villain came in the form of Mads Mikkelsen's Kaecilius. If I'm completely honest with you, I have to say that I was left slightly disappointed by Mikkelsen's performance, or perhaps the amount of it that we saw. He wasn't in the film for nearly as long as I had hoped he would be, and I feel like he was kind of wasted in the role for how little we actually saw of him. Yes, this was the first Doctor Strange film, so I understand that it is a introductory film of some sort, however, there really wasn't enough of him here, and from what I saw, it doesn't look as though we're going to be seeing much more of him any time soon.


The film's cast was made up by quite a few serious names. Alongside Cumberbatch and Mikklesen were the likes of Tilda Swinton, Chiwetel Ejiofor and Rachel McAdams, and this was something else that worked in favour of the film.


I stated at the beginning that I didn't feel the film was as good as I had been expecting it to be. Despite this, it was still up there as one of 2016's better films, but not among the best. However, there is part of me that thinks that the only reason it was still above average for the first time of viewing is because of the brilliant visual effects. There was a hint of Inception with the bending of matter and dimensions and this was very good to see, however if it wasn't for this, I may have very likely felt considerably more let down by the film, and it is for this reason that I probably won't be able to watch the film for a second time in the near future.


All in all, Doctor Strange is a half-decent popcorn film that most cinema goers will enjoy, however will most probably not be blown away by. the cast and the acting were superb, even if perhaps screen time was not distributed as I'd have liked it to be. The storyline is something we have seen before, but is held up by the visual effects that are something quite special, but might have lost some of their wonder when it comes to a second viewing of the film.


7/10


Kira Comerford

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