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By midlandsmovies, May 27 2019 06:42PM



Today I Daydreamed That I Killed Tom From Work


Directed by Scott Driver

4am Pictures

2019


Originally produced for the FiveLampsFilms 24-hour Challenge 2019 comes a new short from Midlands filmmaker Scott Driver.


Fresh from his earlier work with drama short Restroom, the challenge itself seems simple - produce a 3-minute film in one day – but there is fierce competition from a host of talented local production crews.


This film’s title however pretty much sums up the content here. We open on a phone ringing and a number of people in what looks like an everyday British office. Colleagues laugh at screens before a female voiceover (Holly Turner as the put-upon Emily) is heard commenting how she dislikes people in her office. But none more so than Tom.


Our protagonist stares in equal parts boredom and anger from her desk before Tom arrives next to her workspace in a ‘perky’ mood trying to alleviate her priorities. Next as she stands rigid at the photocopier we see Tom in the distance, whilst she goes further to explain how she hates how everyone in fact loves him.


Whilst it captures the mundane routine of a regular worker drone, at the same time the film also fulfils a fantasy I’m sure even the calmest of people have dreamt about doing to their boss at one time or another.


Shot well with technical proficiency with a group cast filling an office space, the short unfolds with Tom explaining how company targets have been hit and the team will get a bonus. But as her limits are pushed, Emily gets up from her desk and shockingly smashes her bosses face in with a keyboard - in a scene slightly reminiscent of James McAvoy’s similar act in Wanted (2008).


Not sufficed with knocking her manager out, our lead bludgeons him further as stunned colleagues are splattered with blood.


Darkly comic in tone and with a bit of American Psycho (2000) thrown in for good measure – where office work and ‘dreams’ of killing came together in a similar fashion – the film is a short sharp shock of violence in the workplace.


And with such a brief run time (and short production time of course), it’s difficult for the film to go into much depth so the filmmaker and his team have wisely kept it simple.


So in conclusion, Driver’s ‘Today I Daydreamed That I Killed Tom From Work’ is a well executed (!) effort with a fun, but gory, premise. And it also hits all its marks and clocks off with a surprise ending guaranteed to ensure an even harder day of graft at work tomorrow.


Michael Sales

By midlandsmovies, Sep 6 2018 11:59AM



Heather (2018)


Directed by Scott Driver


A scream of ecstasy or agony opens new 3-minute short Heather, the latest from Midlands filmmaker Scott Driver


Previously directing other impactful shorts such as HIM and Restroom, it is quickly made clear by the director that these cries are not from pleasure. Or are they? We cut from legs writhing on a bed to a bespectacled woman raining hammer blows on a body in the bedroom who seems more than happy as to what she is doing.


Scrubbing the resulting blood from her face in the mirror, our assailant is then seen dragging a heavy black bin bag outside.


“What’s in the bag?” asks a delivery man who is passing by, leaving us with a palpable tension in the air as she struggles to come up with a suitable reply. And whilst leaving a package he runs off disturbed with what he has witnessed.


A nearby DIY shop comes to the rescue as our unidentified lead purchases a shovel and the audience may guess where this could lead. And yes, a we’re soon off to a wooded area for the body to be disposed.


Director Driver has an eye for showing not telling an audience the main points of his plot and keeps the dialogue at a minimum. The confines of a short run time can force directors into making snappier edits and trims which I’d love to see continue into their longer local feature films.


Created as part of the regional High Peak Independent Film Festival, the short was entered into their 10 hour film challenge. That’s right. Make a movie in just 10 hours – from start to finish. This goes some way to explaining the lack of dialogue but the short is all the better for its visual, rather than expositional, story-telling.


An ending involving a make-shift wooden headstone and a heavy suggestion this may not have been the first killing the perpetrator has committed draws the film to a close. Will she get caught? It’s not looking likely. Lucky Heather indeed.


Driver’s speedy construction of plot, script and narrative combined with the more than fine high production values and shot choices sees a superb short created in super-fast time that also contains a hard impact and an assured confidence from a talented group of local filmmakers.


Mike Sales





By midlandsmovies, Jun 1 2018 12:23PM



Him (2018)


Directed by Scott Driver


4am Pictures


Scott Driver returns after the success of his Midlands Movies Awards nominated film Restroom (our MM review here) with a new short drama called Him.


The 6-minute film opens on the slow running of water in a bathroom as we are shown a man (Michael Muyunda as Daniel) showing signs of stress as he rubs his neck in apparent frustration.


The audience soon hear two voices as Daniel stares into the bathroom mirror and as he begins to undress, a voice asks, “Why are you here Daniel?” and he immerses himself into a full bath.


His response to his this conscience-like voice is simply “I don’t know”, suggesting a conflicted man struggling with his demons. The director uses long deliberate shots to slowly create an atmosphere of anxiety and as Daniel takes a deep breath – we inhale at the concerns about to unfold along with him.


We hear the words “don’t forget me” which hints upon a terrible act to unfold and director Driver shows Daniel rifle through the bathroom cabinet in a frenzy. It is here that the shocking revelation we are witnessing a possible suicide becomes apparent and no punches are pulled with the inclusion of an upsetting shot of a razor blade drawing blood from a forearm.


Sweat, tears and spit pour from Daniel, who seems reticent but genuinely anguished, before he dives head first into the water of the bath. Here the film uses the bathroom as a place of male privacy. But it’s also a representation of cruel cold isolation. With suicide currently the leading cause of death in men under the age of 50 across the UK, Him tackles this dilemma head on.


Between 70-75% of all suicides across the UK are by men and the social and clinical dangers are not clear cut but the film suggests that silence and solitude are observable factors as people become increasingly fragile. The impressive buzzing atonal sounds from composer Erick McNerney also builds a suitable menace without overplaying or oversimplifying the real terror.


From The Shining to Psycho the bathroom has often been presented as a place of disturbing death but unlike the horror genre splatters, this film avoids clichés with a disturbing drama that presents a more harsh authenticity.


As the film cuts to a family dinner, the filmmaker plays with time and space as we ask ourselves if this scene is leading up to the events or set afterwards. With small talk of work and school we soon discover it is afterwards as Daniel’s partner questions how his day has gone. His unconvincing response “It’s been good” leads us to a final shot framed by a window that gives us a glimpse into his troublesome and lonely world.


A short sharp shock of a film, Him has a fantastic central performance from Michael Muyunda who channels a complicated and despondent character with nuance and sensitivity. Feeling like a subject matter that is close to the director’s heart, Him ends up being a superb dark study of despondent males who are still hiding their individual anxieties from the world, and loved ones, around them.


Midlands Movies Mike


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