icons-02 icons-01 MM Logo Instagram FILM FREEWAY LOGO

blog

Movie news, reviews, features and more thoughts coming soon...

By midlandsmovies, Jan 24 2019 11:30AM



Filmmakers homage to Saturday Night and Sunday Morning for 60th Anniversary


Local filmmakers Them Pesky Kids and director Luke Radford are releasing a homage to Alan Sillitoe’s "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" to celebrate the original film’s approaching 60th anniversary at Rough Trade on the 1st of February.


On February 1st of January, Nottingham Director Luke Radford and Them Pesky Kids are hosting a launch night at Rough Trade Nottingham to mark the online release of their homage to Alan Sillitoe’s Saturday Night and Sunday Morning.


Aptly titled, “I’ll be Here After the Factory is Gone” tells a modern day reimagining of Arthur Seaton’s story expressing just how relevant the book and film still is today 60 years later.


Having already screened at Nottingham Contemporary in July, and Broadway Cinema in September as part of their Working Class Heroes season preceding the original film, the Rough Trade screening will mark the third and final public screening of the film before releasing its online release.


With free entry and featuring musical performances from The Ruffs and DJs throughout the night, the event will be taking donations to raise money for the St Anns Advice Centre and Food Bank, a charity dedicated to helping inhabitants in some of the most in need areas of Nottingham.


A modern day homage to Alan Sillitoe’s “Saturday Night and Sunday Morning”. Arthur is a young man stuck in the 9 to 5 office grind, finding his salvation in booze, parties, and women; until a new love brings clarity to his world. Directed by Luke Radford, Starring Aaron Lodge, Kelly Jaggers, and Esmeé Matthews. Set to music of Nottingham band The Ruffs. You can read our full Midlands Movies review by clicking this link.



Director Luke Radford adds, "I saw Saturday Night and Sunday Morning a few years ago and immediately read the book it's based on. It’s over 60 years since it was first released and the environment, themes and characters still resonate".


"I took themes and key elements of the original narrative and placed them in a contemporary setting with Arthur Seaton now working in telesales rather than the Raleigh factory.".


The film will be released online via Them Pesky Kids’ Vimeo and social media pages on the 1st of February at 7.30pm. Them Pesky Kids is a production company based in Nottingham who produce films and provide video content and solutions to a range of companies, www.thempeskykids.co.uk


Luke Radford recently had the limited theatrical release of his debut feature film Outlawed, which is also currently available in the USA on DVD/VOD. The UK release is set for mid 2019. Luke also teaches Film Production at Confetti ICT as he works towards his next project.



By midlandsmovies, Sep 7 2018 03:41PM



Midlands Review - I'll Be Here After the Factory Is Gone


Directed by Luke Radford


Them Pesky Kids


This new film is the latest short from filmmaker Luke Radford which features a soundtrack from Nottingham band The Ruffs but contains far more narrative than you would expect from your average local music video.


The inspiration behind the short is Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, the 1960 British drama film directed by Karel Reisz. That itself is an adaptation of the 1958 novel of the same name by Alan Sillitoe, who also wrote the movie’s screenplay.


And like the book and the film, Radford has featured a young man drinking and partying whilst maintaining affairs and relationships that cause him more than his fair share of trouble.


We open with a young man (Aaron Lodge as Arthur Seaton) who types away at a keyboard in an office that could be any in Britain. However, Radford scores this sequence with the hard clanking of machinery which contradicts the formal office location we see on screen but is a fantastic nod to the Raleigh factory in Nottingham which provided this setting in the 1960 film.


As spreadsheets are discussed, coffee is drunk and staff chat on mobile phones, we are quickly shown the demoralising nature of a desk job that drains your soul. Much like in Fight Club (1999) or Wanted (2008) we get a young male protagonist sick of this grind and itching for the thrills of real life.


Radford speedily edits to upbeat music once Arthur leaves work and the quick cuts capture the excitement of a weekend. As the evening goes on, the rock n roll song is the perfect soundtrack for a night on the beers where pool is played and laughs are had. The inherent machismo is clear to see as Arthur heads to a club and the excellent neon and strobe lighting shows fantastic cinematography skill.


After chatting to a woman, we are then shown the couple waiting for that elusive post-clubbing kebab before cutting to the next morning where she wakes up to find him getting ready to leave. And his problems begin as the lady (Kelly Jaggers as Ruby) has a picture of her family next to the bed. This being a music video, there is no dialogue so Radford expertly creates meaning and plot through small details like this photograph. As Arthur consumes a traditional British breakfast, he returns home to his mum as Ruby’s husband returns to her.


The next sequence shows Arthur again on the town and this time takes a shine to another lady – slightly more his own age – and as the beers flow we see him cosy up to Anne (played by Esmee Matthews) back in another nightclub.



The film pauses briefly here and as the book itself is in two parts (the Saturday night and Sunday morning obviously) this short also establishes its own break as a secondary – more melancholic song – begins.


Arthur spends time with this new girl at an arcade and at a bowling alley (echoes of the amusement ride from the original film here too) but Ruby and her family are also here. The film then pulls no punches as Arthur enters a city underpass and a violent retribution is enacted by her husband and his friends.


There are consequences to his hedonism after all but does he deserve this? Well, the film doesn’t answer this question and like the book it’s inspired by, we see that as time passes his wounds slowly heal yet one final encounter with Ruby suggests he still has mixed feelings of settling down.


Radford’s film is a great adaptation of a classic British kitchen-sink drama and although he brings the story into the 21st century he does not let the core messages and themes get overshadowed by his update. With no dialogue the actors do well to convey their characters and Radford allows the images to direct the audience to the important plot developments. With love, violence, relationships and more all covered in its short 8-minute run time, Radford has admirably condensed a large cinematic tale into a succinct adaptation without losing any of its power.


Mike Sales


I’ll Be Here After the Factory Is Gone is screening before the original film on the 23rd September 2018 at 1pm at the Broadway Cinema in Nottingham


More details here: http://www.broadway.org.uk/events/film-saturday-night-and-sunday-morning1




RSS Feed twitter