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By midlandsmovies, Sep 13 2019 09:20AM



Midlands Spotlight - 3rd Annual Q-Film Weekender 8-10 November


The Q-Film Weekender returns to the Northampton Filmhouse from Friday 8 to Sunday 10 November 2019 for its third year.


Running across three days, the festival celebrates queer cinema from around the world, showcasing LGBTQIA+ talent and films with an exciting programme of features and shorts, exclusive previews and complementary events. Highlights of the festival are now on-sale with further films to be announced.


The programme includes award-winning films such as Céline Sciamma’s highly-acclaimed Portrait of a Lady on Fire and the trans documentary Seahorse: The Dad Who Gave Birth, followed by an exclusive Q&A with star Freddy McConnell.


Other events and Q&As include a selection of shorts and a special ‘In Conversation’ with trans filmmaker Jake Graf on Saturday 9t November. Tickets for these films and events can now be booked via the Filmhouse website www.northamptonfilmhouse.com or by calling 01604 624811.


The Q-Film Weekender is also proud to announce its Q-Film panellists: Q-Film’s Cat Nicholas, Co-Chair of Northampton Pride and Community Co-Chair of Northampton Borough Council’s LGBTQIA+ Forum Matthew Toresen, Screen Northants co-founder Becky Adams, Borough Councillor for Phippsville Anna King and Northampton Outlaw’s Simon Chapman.


The full programme is to be announced shortly on the Northampton Filmhouse website and the Weekender’s social media.


The Q-Film Weekender is presented in association with Q-Film and has been made possible by grant funding from Film Audience Network.


By midlandsmovies, Jul 26 2019 02:00PM

Movies shot in the Midlands


The Midlands with its mix of industrial cities and town centres and its swathes of picturesque countryside and regal-like manors and houses can provide film-makers with a wide range of locations for their shoots.


We take a look at some of the films that were made in the region and recommend that you go and check them out as most of these places are open to visitors too!


“Morning film fans - We'll be tweeting Midlands movie locations you can visit over the sunny weekend around the region...”


Cult classic The Princess Bride (1987) was shot on location at Haddon Hall #Derby which represented Humperdinck's Florin Castle in the film


#Jadoo (2013) is a comedy starring Harish Patel (from Run Fatboy Run) and filmed entirely in #Leicester @JadooMovie


Tom Hooper directed The Damned United (2009) with Michael Sheen as Brian Clough & Chesterfield FC stood in for Wembley in the film #Derby


Another football movie Goal 3 was filmed around the #Midlands including in #Nottingham and at #Leicester's King Power stadium


I visited Snake Pass, Kedleston #Derby few years ago which is in 2007's "And When Did You Last See Your Father?" http://t.co/mOablgizfM


Snake Pass was on way to Hadfield #Derby where I visited locale of The League of Gentlemen (2005 film from TV series) http://t.co/oswgfuV7Wj


The coastal marshes from Atonement (2007) are at Gedney Drove End, a beach on the Wash in #Lincolnshire #Midlands


The Upper Derwent Valley in #Derbyshire (the test area for the real raids) doubled as the Ruhr valley for the film The Dam Busters (1955)


In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1) when Snape arrives at ‘Malfoy Manor’ it is actually Hardwick Hall in #Derbyshire #Midlands


And last year, Midlands Movies visited @WollatonHall #Nottingham for @OutdoorFilm in this #DarkKnightRises get up http://t.co/7sjyMNNHQ8


Les Misérables (2013) depicted the family estate of Marius using Boughton House, Kettering in #Northampton #Midlands


The Italian Job (1969) - Although the entrance was filmed in Turin, the length of sewer used was a new pipe being installed in #Coventry


Jan De Bont's The Haunting (1999) was filmed both at Harlaxton Manor (Great Hall) in Grantham #Lincolnshire & at Belvoir Castle #Leicester


Felicia’s Journey (1999) - The rainy street scene and cinema exteriors in the Bob Hoskins movie were filmed in Station Street outside the Electric Cinema, where a plaque was later erected.


Thunderball (1965) used RAF Waddington, Lincolnshire for the film's Airforce base runway scene #Midlands #Lincolnshire


Bolsover's local pit fitting workshop and the Empire were used as locations for the film The Full Monty (1997) #Derby #Midlands


Four Feathers (2002) starring Heath Ledger was partly filmed at Burley House in Oakham #Leicestershire #Midlands


Goodbye Mr Chips (1939) had the exterior shots of Brookfield School filmed at Repton School near Burton #Derby #Midlands


Midlands director @ShadyMeadows 2002 Once Upon a Time in the Midlands starred Robert Carlyle and was set primarily in Carlton #Nottingham


The Old Bailey in Scandal (1989) is actually Shire Hall in High Pavement #Nottingham and stood in for the infamous courts during the movie


Nicholas Winding Refn filmed 2009's Bronson (Tom Hardy) around the St. Ann’s, Sherwood, Worksop & Welbeck Abbey areas of #Nottingham


Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) starred Albert Finney and was shot at the Raleigh Bicycle factory in Radford #Nottingham


Shadowlands (1993): Among the locations used in the Anthony Hopkins movie were Hole-in-the- Wall, Capler Woods and historic Goodrich Castle.


#Leicester's Great Central Railway is a pivotal location in Buster (1988), Phil Collins’ Great Train Robbery movie and The Hours (2002)


Control (2000) about the life/death of Joy Division’s Ian Curtis was partly filmed in #Nottingham around places Curtis was known to frequent


Belvoir Castle #Leicester is home to the Duke of Rutland & seen in Young Sherlock Holmes (1985) + Ron Howard’s The Da Vinci Code #midlands

John Cleese 80s classic farce Clockwise had scenes filmed at Edward’s School, Edgbaston & Menzies High School in West Brom #midlands


Brassed Off (1996) actually saw the band play in #Birmingham Town Hall which stood in for the Royal Albert Hall in the movie #Midlands


Ralph and Cedric argue at "Windsor Castle" in King Ralph (1991) which starred John Goodman but it is actually great hall and state rooms of Warwick Castle, Warks.


#Derby hero Alan Bates starred in Women in Love ('69) which featured Kedleston Hall as his & Eleanor Bron’s house #midlands #film


#Derby's historic Chatsworth House was turned into Mr Darcy’s home “Pemberley” in Pride and Prejudice (2005) #midlands


Haddon Hall, Bakewell, was used as Hatfield House, Elizabeth (1997) & doubled as Thornfield Hall in Zeffirelli’s Jane Eyre (1996) #Midlands


The Da Vinci Code was partly filmed in Lincolnshire including Burghley House, Stamford and "Westminster Abbey" was in fact Lincoln Cathedral


The Other Boleyn Girl (2008) by Justin Chadwick starred Scarlett Johansson & Natalie Portman as Mary Boleyn and sister Anne Boleyn. Parts of the film were shot in Dovedale, Cave Dale in Castleton and Haddon Hall, as well as at North Lees Hall.


"Thor's Cave, Manifold Valley, Staffordshire and the Peak District in Derby were both used for locations in The Lair of the White Worm (1988)


I've saved the best until last - Top Secret! (1984) - Fleurgendorf prison exterior filmed at Rockingham Castle, Corby #Northamptonshire


Movies in the Midlands, Films in the Midlands, Films shot in the Midlands, Film Locations in the Midlands, Movie Locations in the Midlands, Midlands Movies, Midllands Films

By midlandsmovies, Jun 5 2019 11:42AM



Dates announced and submissions now open for third annual Q-Film Weekender


The Northampton Filmhouse is proud to present the third edition of Q-Film Weekender from Friday 8 to Sunday 10 November 2019, a three-day festival celebrating heroes of queer cinema and showcasing LGBTQIA+ stories from around the world.


The programme looks to include exclusive previews, features and short films, alongside complementary events.


For the first time, the Filmhouse invites filmmakers to submit qualifying films to be considered for official selection as part of the festival. A panel of experts from the LGBTQIA+ community within Northamptonshire will advise and curate the programme for the big screen, with prizes awarded to winning films.


Through the Q-Film Weekender, the Filmhouse is excited to provide a platform for new filmmakers and bring innovative films to audiences they may not have had the opportunity to see before.


To find out more and submit a film for consideration, go to www.FilmFreeway.com and search for Q-Film Weekender. The deadline for submissions is Sunday 8 September 2019.


Full terms and conditions, including submissions fees, can be found on FilmFreeway


CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR FILM


The full programme will be announced at a later date.


The Q-Film Weekender is presented in association with Q-Film and has been made possible by grant funding from Film Audience Network.



By midlandsmovies, Apr 19 2019 08:09AM



Midlands Review - Troubled Waters


Directed & written by Gemma Norton


A tear runs down the cheek of our protagonist Viv in the opening of this award-winning drama from Midlands director Gemma Norton and the audience too will be moved by this fantastic film, Troubled Waters.


Viv is a mother of two – played by Vivienne Bell who won Best Actress at our 2019 Midlands Movies Awards – and her harrowing yet sensitive portrayal of a mum suffering mental health issues is a huge part of the short’s success.


Troubled Waters shows Viv undertaking a variety of household tasks, but she is concerned there’s something wrong with her baby daughter. Her husband Terry (Terry Sweeney) allays her fears but Viv is adamant she is not exaggerating.


With the baby crying, Viv’s stress levels rise and we see her curled up like a foetus on a bed, struggling to cope with the various demands of parenthood. These strong images are beautifully composed by the director and are shot excellently by the film’s cinematographer Richard Staff.


Bell does a great performance of a woman exhausted by motherhood and the story sees her attributing these anxieties ‘onto’ her children. As the strain begins to take its toll on her own health, Viv shouts at the infants before fainting due to the toll its physically taking.



Filmed in a naturalistic way, the stylistic realism and exploration of parental themes – along with Bell’s own slight resemblance to Jessica Chastain – the film has echoes of Terence Malick’s Tree of Life. Like that film, Troubled Waters concerns itself with hugely important aspects of family existence too.


A trip to the swimming baths shows some brief family fun but reveals Viv’s dependency on medication to deal with her worries. And in addition we see her suspiciously spying her partner and children from behind a curtain, suggesting her trauma is far from resolved.


As we come to the film’s conclusion, the disturbing themes come to a climax and extreme exhaustion overcomes Viv keeping the film’s tension high.


Troubled Waters covers a range of post-natal depression (PND) conditions including fatigue, exhaustion, guilt, shame and feelings of hopelessness but director Norton never pushes the envelope so far that we feel that she couldn’t recover from these frustrations. Despite her lack of ability to think through things clearly, Viv is shown bonding with the baby towards the end leaving viewers on a message, albeit a very small one, of hope.


An intense, emotional and thorough exploration of post-natal psychological stress, Troubled Waters is a brilliant film showcasing top talent and excellent high-quality technical aspects. With stunning images, a focused narrative and an affecting premise, the short is unsettling but hugely satisfying as it deals with the risk factors of such an important disorder in a sensitive way.


Michael Sales


By midlandsmovies, Mar 10 2019 10:47AM



Midlands Review - Headphones


Directed by Thomas Line


2018


This new 7-minute short comes from Northampton director Thomas Line and tells the story of an introverted young girl who retreats from the world into the music blaring from her headphones.


We open in a bedroom where the girl Sarah (a fantastic Arabella Smith-James) is reading and listening to music as she blocks out the sound of what we assume are arguing parents.


Increasing the volume to drown out their war of words we then jump from night to day on a college campus where two girls hand out flyers for a local gig.


Sarah takes a flyer before pausing to exchange glances with one of the girls (actress Olivia Noyce in a small but important support role as Naomi), however as she heads into an underpass she crosses paths with a group of males who snatch the headphones from her head.


The small but meaningful glances are testament to good performance from the actresses as director Line uses music throughout. And its constant presence places the audience in a similar place to our protagonist. The absence of reams of dialogue also demonstrates a good handling of pacing and visuals to get the story across too, which compliments the subtle expressions on the faces of the girls.


As Sarah tries to retrieve her headphones from the one of the bullies (a menacing Joseph T. Callaghan) they are smashed on the ground and she returns home to the ever-constant presence of her family shouting.


With her soul crying out for a replacement, Sarah spots the flyer and decides to head to the live show. At the gig she spies the girl from before, and as the band take the stage she builds up the confidence to join the dancefloor, swaying in time to the music. The boy from the underpass is also there but Sarah rejects his advances before Noyce’s character Naomi steals his drink and invites Sarah outside on to a rooftop.


The cast are effective in a short that covers a lot of emotions with very few words. Placing an emphasis on a good soundtrack, the excellent sound editing and mixing is one of the film’s many technical achievements.


As the film draws to its conclusion, the short focuses on female friendship – or perhaps more – as Sarah comes out - both of her shell and more literally outside of the bar - for an intimate final moment of “headphone sharing” with her new acquaintance.


The fact the film treats this relationship as something for the audience to decide upon is a fine creative choice as the two look out across a sunset over the city and whether love or friendship, simply shows a sensitive connection between two people.


With brilliant performances from the three main cast members and the director’s focus on private and public moments, the film is a first-rate look at young female relationships. Exceptional music editing reflecting the feelings of those involved also emphasises its focus on aural experiences. And the excellent sound arrangement alongside the visuals helps create the narrative beats too.


As it wraps up though, Headphones emphasises the heart much more so than the head, and ends up being a tremendous local short that expresses a melodic harmony between two tender souls.


Michael Sales


By midlandsmovies, Nov 29 2017 09:57AM



Midlands Spotlight - Screenwriter Neil O Neil


Midlands Movies Mike finds out about regional screenwriter Neil O'Neil who has begun work on a number of shorts and features in the region.


Neil O'Neil is an English award winning screenplay writer whose script, 'I.E.' won the best Epic screenplay award at the 2014 Monaco International Film Festival and has now been picked up by Hollywood Director Cyrus Yavneh.


Furthermore, his short film, 'The Magpie' won the Tabula Short Film cup 2014 and has been a finalist for New Renaissance Film Festival 2016. And more recently Neil has started producing films and is currently working on getting a number of features made.


Neil's latest is Chocolate Potato whose script has been greenlit and is Neil's first full feature being commissioned by Midas Light Films. Currently in pre-production, scheduling and budgeting, the film is being planned for a shoot in early 2018.



Telling the story of an illicit spam email which arrives at the wrong time that pushes a man over the brink when his wife thinks he’s having an affair. He then enlists a weird friend before going on a bizarre and hilarious journey trying to put things right in an unusual combination of drama, comedy and words.


Originally writing as a lyricist - with a claim to fame being an album in the German Rock charts in 1982 - Neil spent 15 years living in Europe working writing seriously in 1999 when a lucid evening of delirium in Warsaw planted a complete multicoloured version of 'The Shooting Gallery' in his head.


Three years later he had a creative writing diploma from the University of East Anglia and has also completed numerous scriptwriting, director and production courses at the UEA, City University of London, Arts University Bournemouth and Raindance.


Based in Central England, Midas Light Films has been set up as a cooperative by an International Award winning Producer and the team consists of a network of award winning Directors, DoPs, Editors and screenplay writers; all based in an around the Midlands. Besides using exceptional 'Front-End' talent, Midas collaborates with International directors and have experience in features, shorts, documentaries, music videos, TV, live streaming and corporate videos.


Follow Neil on twitter - @UKScreenplays

www.screenplays.co.uk

http://midaslightfilms.co.uk



By midlandsmovies, Aug 4 2017 07:49AM



Midlands Movies speaks to local legend Thomas Hodge aka The Dude Designs who for years has been respected as one of the best alternative poster designers out there but who now has taken his first steps into making his very own film.


Thomas Hodge is the poster artist behind Hobo with A Shotgun (2011) The Innkeepers (2011) The Heat (2013) WolfCop (2014) and many more, as well as the author of VHS: Video Cover Art (2015). This book is the first of its kind to comprehensively bring together the artwork on UK VHS covers from the '80s to the '90s.


But now Tom is now proud to present his first stint in the director's chair with 'Teddy Bears Picnic', a proof-of-concept short film selected to premiere at this year's Fright Fest in London.


Written, produced, directed and financed by Tom himself, the film stars US actress Abby Miller (Justified, Aquarius & The Sinner TV series) and Laurence R Harvey (Human Centipede 2+3, ABCs of Death 2 & The Editor) yet was shot entirely in the Midlands at Welford in Northampton.


“I'm VERY excited to announce my first film project at long last!” says Tom who has kept the project behind guarded doors during its production. He adds, “It’s great the film is also showing at Fright Fest in London on the 28th August and with a world-wide online release to follow I hope it’s possible to develop it into a feature”.



The film revolves around a mother and daughter playing games in the forest but unbeknownst to them there is somebody watching their every move. Filmed entirely on location in the rural woodlands of the English Northampton countryside, Tom describes the short as "a year-long trip in terms of production but seven years of work in total”.


“I've been hands-on throughout, donning many new creative hats to produce, direct, art-direct and edit for the first time. I spent months making props, building creepy woodlands and creating original costumes."


Tom says how he was inspired by the 1907 melody of the same name, “Teddy Bears Picnic re-envisions the childhood song as a nightmarish fable that twists the concept of childhood innocence. I particularly loved the creativity of high concept horror in the '70s and '80s – from the films of Charles Band to the pulp horror novels of Guy N. Smith. So I wanted to take classic character-driven horror and develop it to suit contemporary tastes, with a strongly stylised visual approach”.


Tom also had the invaluable input of an “amazing director of photography" James Fox and the help and support from co-producer Natalie Dorn who also sacrificed a year for production. A musical score by Sophie Galpin (Pins-band) and sound design by Todd Freeman (Cell Count & Love Sick) add to the small cast and crew alongside co-writer Russell Norris.


With a set of teaser trailers being released online over the next month, you can get updates on the film at Tom’s YouTube channel - click here


And check out Tom’s poster art at https://www.thedudedesigns.com




By midlandsmovies, Apr 11 2017 06:10PM



Midlands Movies Mike speaks to Northampton based actress Kate Fenwick about her life in the industry so far.


Midlands Movies: Hi Kate, how are you and could you tell our readers a bit about yourself?

Kate Fenwick: I’m good thanks. Well, I am 22 years old and I am currently based in Northampton. I graduated from Northampton University with a BA in Acting which I received in 2015. On a personal level I rent an apartment with my friends and have a wonderful boyfriend who is also an actor.


MM: Thanks Kate. So you’re from the Midlands area then?

KF: Yep! But born and bred in Lincolnshire, out east! I was brought up in a cute little village called Middle Rasen.


MM: So after moving around the region how did you get where you are now?

KF: I’ve been performing since the age of 11 at various theatre companies in Lincoln. However, I was 14 when I was signed to my first agent.


MM: That’s very impressive!

KF: Well, it’s still very early on in my career so I wouldn’t say I am in a position to choose my own projects just yet - but my ultimate goal is to be working in film and television. If I could choose, being in a Netflix Original would be pretty amazing, or maybe a BBC 3 Drama.


MM: And what have you learnt upon the way?

KF: You have to understand your self-worth as an actor! I have agreed in the past to take part in projects where the money situation was pretty poor. I found it hard to say anything as I didn’t think I had a voice compared to other people working within the project.


MM: Is speaking up a hard thing to do for actors?

KF: It is something that I am still working on, but in this day and age, I do think actors should be more assertive so that we are valued just as much as everyone else involved in that certain project. Also, I want to be as consistent as possible, and in this industry, that isn’t something I can really control.


MM: You’ve recently appeared on the BBC show Doctors. Can you tell our readers about that experience?

KF: On set, everyone was so lovely and I was well looked after! I would arrive on set and then head straight to costume and then hair and make-up. After that, it would be a rehearsal and then filming.


MM: Sounds a great time. Has anyone helped you along the way? Any heroes for example?

KF: I think my drama teachers at school definitely had a part to play in my decision to become a professional actor. Their guidance and passion was contagious and they made me feel confident enough to fully commit. I would say my heroes are more personal based. My family are amazing and I wouldn’t be an actor if it wasn’t for my dad!


MM: Sounds like you’ve got a lot of great support around you. What are the hurdles you’ve had to overcome?

KF: I remember the night before going to University pretty clearly as my mindset of whether to go or not was constantly changing because I am very family orientated. I also wasn’t sure If I could do it. I kept saying to myself “I’ll make a final decision next week” and then “next week” and so on, but sure enough, it became the best three years of my life. Acting all day everyday with your best friends is priceless and I will always recommend going to Uni.


MM: That’s great to hear. And with regards to film, what are your favourite movies and what have they helped you with?

KF: Awakenings is probably my favourite film. I don’t think you can much go wrong really when a film is so closely based on a true story. I care for the characters much more and the performances in that film are stunning!


MM: And so thinking of the future, what does that hold in store for you?

KF: I would love to stay in the Midlands and earn enough as an actor to buy my own place here. The problem is though that an actor needs to follow the work, so I won’t have a lot of choice. Northampton is great because it is situated in the centre of the country with central routes. I do like to support local projects though and hope to continue doing this!


MM: Any final thoughts that could help others in a similar position?

KF: Well, people instantly think of London when you talk about sustaining yourself as an actor. But you are a small fish in the sea and I think it is so important to connect in other places for sure. I do believe that due to less competition in the Midlands, actors can be seen for longer and there is loads of stuff going on too.


MM: We couldn’t agree more! Thanks for your time Kate and all the best for the future.

KF: Cheers. It’s been a pleasure.


To get in touch and to find out more information about Kate contact her via Spotlight on the details here:


Pin: 1890-1202-7283 https://www.spotlight.com/interactive/cv/1890-1202-7283



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