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By midlandsmovies, Sep 17 2018 08:29AM



Midlands Review - Vigilante Style (2018)


Dir. Edward James Smith


A Pictured Visions Production


Vigilante Style is a new independent feature film written, directed and starring regional filmmaker Edward James Smith. Starting out as a short film all the way back in 2013, the filmmaker developed sequences over many years which eventually became this feature-length production.


The film begins with the “Our Feature Presentation” logo from Tarantino’s Kill Bill and Grindhouse and this ‘Funky Fanfare’ combined with a fast-paced montage a la Guy Ritchie hints where the filmmaker’s influences lie.


It starts by using voiceover as it flashes backwards and forwards in time concerning events from 10 years ago and how they affect the present. Vigilante Gilmer Diamond (Edward James Smith himself) is captured by Alex Steele (Jon Peet) and with revenge on almost everyone’s mind and a wide set of criminal characters, the movie tries to balance multiple story threads in a seedy tale of deception.


However, that is easier said than done. Characters are not fully introduced or fleshed out and the story becomes a mix of confusing tales all explained using expositional dialogue.


And it’s unfortunate as the dialogue is one of the problems here owing to a sound mix that varies so wildly it’s difficult to concentrate on the matters on screen. With amazing HD cameras available, it’s such a shame to see a film with a lot of potential undermine itself with poorly recorded audio. And although the acting verges on being suitably over the top, all the performances are undercut by that poor audio production.


As characters get their comeuppance and gangs cross-paths with each other, we see an increase in violence with fights, shootouts and even a cricket bat making an appearance. Because it was filmed over many years (it was one of our first blogs back in 2014), maybe the filmmaker’s focus changed and so the movie’s broken narrative reflects those altered ambitions.



I enjoyed the Leicester locations of my home town and it was great to see the filmmakers utilise so many varied buildings and streets around the city to keep a variety to the proceedings. Yet filming around the city exacerbates the sound issues with city traffic, background hums and windy alleys all causing their own issues.


Smith throws in a lot of varied techniques in his fast-paced film though. Voice-over, freeze frames and subtitles are added to his guerrilla filmmaking style and the use of chapter titles again show a nod to Tarantino. Yet the good editing is undermined by a lack of cinematography as a huge percentage of the film looks like mobile-phone footage at times.


But in reality it keeps coming back to sound – at times a decent soundtrack is used from artists like Suicide Bees, Blake J. Carpenter and Soul Release – but the dialogue and conversations need much more work. Better mixing and some ADR would go a long way – especially with the voiceover – and improve the viewing experience 10-fold.


Clearly a passion project, it has the vibe and seemingly the budget of a student film and it wears its b-movie credentials proudly on its sleeves. In many respects it seems more like a film that was good fun to make and I admired the passion of a group of friends getting a project together. However, willing friends doing you a lot of favours is one thing, trying to pull it together over a number of years is another.


And so, although it’s all undertaken with a lot of devotion you just have to try and ignore the lack of technical expertise. A number of different quality issues – some sections underlit, others overlit – continue to show a lack of consistency and ultimately it pays the price of its cheap shortcuts.


Maybe it’s a case of running before it can walk. Vigilante Style has flashes of editing and story proficiency but they are drowned out by some sloppiness and that one fatal flaw I keep coming back to – the sound and its design.


I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, even with a low budget a filmmaker needs to know what their budget is, and of course the limitations that brings. It’s a badge of honour to say you’ve made a feature film but sometimes the filmmaker is stretching that little bit too far with the resources at hand.


Expanding what I would imagine was an inventive short into a full feature is no easy task and Vigilante Style shows that good intentions can only go so far with a passionate but slapdash approach. More Neil Breen than David Lean, Smith has stretched a short concept to breaking point and only the most hardcore exploitation fans need apply.


Mike Sales


By midlandsmovies, Sep 15 2018 04:28PM



Midlands Review - The Night They Crashed Here


Directed by Jack Veasey


“It was just another normal day” proclaims a voice at the start of new sci-fi drama The Night They Crashed Here, but this new short from Jack Veasey moves very quickly away from any sense of “normal” to much more sinister themes.


Filmed in early 2018 around Coventry and from the director of Tony, George Wills stars as Paul Jones who introduces himself via a Bogart-like voiceover. However his interviews are the product of his press reporter credentials rather than those of a private detective. The film is entirely shot in black and white and along with the voiceover, the noir influences can be seen from the start including the brick wall motifs and the low-key lighting.


As Jones exits his vehicle after a particularly strong storm, he stands against a cloudy sky and as great tension building noise reaches a crescendo he witnesses strange lightning which bolts to the earth. This eerie phenomenon is excellently realised and the filmmaker’s insistence on holding on the shot an agonisingly long time was just perfect to keep the viewer on edge.


The inventive and creative special effects compliment the very well-lit locations and the film echoes Sin City at times - but here the director has achieved his look without green screen. And the stark contrasting lighting lets the shadows do a lot of the work to create a sense of mystery and intrigue. As Jones arrives at the landing site, he spies a mysterious pod in the rubble and removes a strange device which appears to infect him when the deceased alien arm originally holding it shocks it back into life.


About half way through the music changes to a slightly odd glockenspiel style ditty which although evoked the Raymond Chandler-based flicks of the 40s seemed at odds with the sci-fi direction of the plot. Although no doubt intentional this clash between the old and new became a bit of a concern throughout.


The voice from Jones is sadly a little monotone too and could have used a bit more energy or verve in the delivery of the dialogue. The importance of one line is no different to any other which was unfortunately a little bland. Very soon after, a couple of fellow reporters arrive (Andre Pierre as Smith and Becki Lloyd as Williams) and they discuss the dead body. With the possibility of a high-paying scoop about an extra-terrestrial, they plan to claim the discovery as their own. Which will be to the detriment of Jones who they need out the way.


When Jones is approached from behind by Smith, he lashes out in surprise and we start to get hints that he may be succumbing to an alien infection as his ears bleed and his emotions drain. The tale twists again as another morally ambiguous deal is suggested between Smith and Jones to get rid of Williams. And whilst Smith plays a con on both sides to cover his intentions, Jones is hiding a lot more from them both.


The music changes once more at the film’s end – echoing a melodramatic silent film score of sorts – and the short again hints to its retro influences. Like a good noir, there are double crosses and dark realisations that materialise towards it conclusion. And on a technical level, the film uses noir traits like unbalanced compositions, dramatic shadows and skewed shots as well as, literally, an ‘alienated’ protagonist.


In conclusion, looking back with its music and style but forward with its fantastic effects and sci-fi approach, The Night They Crashed Here is an interesting experiment to mix two unlikely genres. And whilst not always delivering the cohesion needed to blend old and new influences, has enough going for it to make it an inventive hardboiled slice of noir and science fiction.


Mike Sales


By midlandsmovies, Sep 7 2018 03:41PM



Midlands Review - I'll Be Here After the Factory Is Gone


Directed by Luke Radford


Them Pesky Kids


This new film is the latest short from filmmaker Luke Radford which features a soundtrack from Nottingham band The Ruffs but contains far more narrative than you would expect from your average local music video.


The inspiration behind the short is Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, the 1960 British drama film directed by Karel Reisz. That itself is an adaptation of the 1958 novel of the same name by Alan Sillitoe, who also wrote the movie’s screenplay.


And like the book and the film, Radford has featured a young man drinking and partying whilst maintaining affairs and relationships that cause him more than his fair share of trouble.


We open with a young man (Aaron Lodge as Arthur Seaton) who types away at a keyboard in an office that could be any in Britain. However, Radford scores this sequence with the hard clanking of machinery which contradicts the formal office location we see on screen but is a fantastic nod to the Raleigh factory in Nottingham which provided this setting in the 1960 film.


As spreadsheets are discussed, coffee is drunk and staff chat on mobile phones, we are quickly shown the demoralising nature of a desk job that drains your soul. Much like in Fight Club (1999) or Wanted (2008) we get a young male protagonist sick of this grind and itching for the thrills of real life.


Radford speedily edits to upbeat music once Arthur leaves work and the quick cuts capture the excitement of a weekend. As the evening goes on, the rock n roll song is the perfect soundtrack for a night on the beers where pool is played and laughs are had. The inherent machismo is clear to see as Arthur heads to a club and the excellent neon and strobe lighting shows fantastic cinematography skill.


After chatting to a woman, we are then shown the couple waiting for that elusive post-clubbing kebab before cutting to the next morning where she wakes up to find him getting ready to leave. And his problems begin as the lady (Kelly Jaggers as Ruby) has a picture of her family next to the bed. This being a music video, there is no dialogue so Radford expertly creates meaning and plot through small details like this photograph. As Arthur consumes a traditional British breakfast, he returns home to his mum as Ruby’s husband returns to her.


The next sequence shows Arthur again on the town and this time takes a shine to another lady – slightly more his own age – and as the beers flow we see him cosy up to Anne (played by Esmee Matthews) back in another nightclub.



The film pauses briefly here and as the book itself is in two parts (the Saturday night and Sunday morning obviously) this short also establishes its own break as a secondary – more melancholic song – begins.


Arthur spends time with this new girl at an arcade and at a bowling alley (echoes of the amusement ride from the original film here too) but Ruby and her family are also here. The film then pulls no punches as Arthur enters a city underpass and a violent retribution is enacted by her husband and his friends.


There are consequences to his hedonism after all but does he deserve this? Well, the film doesn’t answer this question and like the book it’s inspired by, we see that as time passes his wounds slowly heal yet one final encounter with Ruby suggests he still has mixed feelings of settling down.


Radford’s film is a great adaptation of a classic British kitchen-sink drama and although he brings the story into the 21st century he does not let the core messages and themes get overshadowed by his update. With no dialogue the actors do well to convey their characters and Radford allows the images to direct the audience to the important plot developments. With love, violence, relationships and more all covered in its short 8-minute run time, Radford has admirably condensed a large cinematic tale into a succinct adaptation without losing any of its power.


Mike Sales


I’ll Be Here After the Factory Is Gone is screening before the original film on the 23rd September 2018 at 1pm at the Broadway Cinema in Nottingham


More details here: http://www.broadway.org.uk/events/film-saturday-night-and-sunday-morning1




By midlandsmovies, Sep 6 2018 11:59AM



Heather (2018)


Directed by Scott Driver


A scream of ecstasy or agony opens new 3-minute short Heather, the latest from Midlands filmmaker Scott Driver


Previously directing other impactful shorts such as HIM and Restroom, it is quickly made clear by the director that these cries are not from pleasure. Or are they? We cut from legs writhing on a bed to a bespectacled woman raining hammer blows on a body in the bedroom who seems more than happy as to what she is doing.


Scrubbing the resulting blood from her face in the mirror, our assailant is then seen dragging a heavy black bin bag outside.


“What’s in the bag?” asks a delivery man who is passing by, leaving us with a palpable tension in the air as she struggles to come up with a suitable reply. And whilst leaving a package he runs off disturbed with what he has witnessed.


A nearby DIY shop comes to the rescue as our unidentified lead purchases a shovel and the audience may guess where this could lead. And yes, a we’re soon off to a wooded area for the body to be disposed.


Director Driver has an eye for showing not telling an audience the main points of his plot and keeps the dialogue at a minimum. The confines of a short run time can force directors into making snappier edits and trims which I’d love to see continue into their longer local feature films.


Created as part of the regional High Peak Independent Film Festival, the short was entered into their 10 hour film challenge. That’s right. Make a movie in just 10 hours – from start to finish. This goes some way to explaining the lack of dialogue but the short is all the better for its visual, rather than expositional, story-telling.


An ending involving a make-shift wooden headstone and a heavy suggestion this may not have been the first killing the perpetrator has committed draws the film to a close. Will she get caught? It’s not looking likely. Lucky Heather indeed.


Driver’s speedy construction of plot, script and narrative combined with the more than fine high production values and shot choices sees a superb short created in super-fast time that also contains a hard impact and an assured confidence from a talented group of local filmmakers.


Mike Sales





By midlandsmovies, Sep 6 2018 10:00AM



Margie's Garden


Directed by Ash Morris


An official selection of the NO/GLOSS Film Festival, Margie’s Garden is a new dark comedy-drama from regional filmmaker Ash Morris.


We open with a pensioner – Abigail Hamilton as Margie – who watches a bomber-jacket clad man working on an allotment as she takes a sip of a warm drink from a flask. Appearances can be deceiving however as we soon discover that this kindly old lady – next seen as high as a kite in her front room – is a local drug dealer with her home filled to the ceiling with cannabis plants.


Her similarly aged friends also seem to be enjoying the “high” life where copious amount of munchies in the form of sugary cakes and chocolate eclairs being consumed.


The film uses a realistic slice-of-life handheld aesthetic which gives it an air (smoke-filled of course) of authenticity despite the large leaps in imagination.


The story continues as Steven Arnold – from Morris’ previous film BARE (see Midlands Movies review here) – plays the mysterious Adam. And he suspects the house is a drug den, and one he could exploit for his own nefarious ends.


Showing up uninvited, the dope appears at the front door and threatens to expose the operation to the authorities unless he gets his slice. Margie seems less than fazed by the pressure and reminds him of his manners as he greedily downs tea and biscuits.


The film cross-cuts the main narrative with dream-like shots of people getting high on bongs and reefer. This is reflected in the cinematography where backlit rooms are filled with smoke and an air of hippie-infused haze. And slow motion, Dutch angles and heavily reverbed voices all lend the film an eerie tone too.


A strange comparison admittedly, these sequences reminded me of the melancholic slo-mo drug taking scenes in sci-fi reboot Dredd (2012) but they are hilariously cut with shots of domestic chores. Margie indulges herself in washing up and (pot?) tea served up in her best china as a lullaby style soundtrack plays in the background.


Margie then sends her son Kieron (This Is England’s burly George Newton) to face Adam in order to “tenderise the meat” in a brutal scene of retribution. She’s one old lady not to mess with! But after he returns to apologise, her nice side returns by offering him a pain-relieving spliff. Perhaps gaining a new customer in the process? Well, actually no. As he passes out from the herb, his ultimate outcome is far, far worse than you could imagine.


Written by Nicola Monaghan, she channels the British eccentricity of Ben Wheatley and a hint of The League of Gentlemen. And whilst it has a story similarity to the French film Paulette (2012), Monaghan balances the difficult task of being humorous yet grim and serious just moments later.


But the true star is the funny and sweet, yet very menacing, Abigail Hamilton as Margie herself. Seeing an old lady using the vernacular of the streets is comical alongside her animated face when in a drug high. However, as the tale turns more dark so does she, and her intense stare may haunt audiences' dreams for nights to come. Clever, and well shot on a technical level, I’d highly recommend checking out this strange Scarface of suburbia.


Mike Sales


By midlandsmovies, Aug 29 2018 06:55PM



Outlawed (2018)


Directed by Adam Collins & Luke Radford


Outlaw Productions


“Who do you think you are? Bruce Willis?”


So says one cop in new Nottingham film Outlawed. And by all accounts, co-director, co-writer and main star of the film Adam Collins – also a former Royal Marine Commando – may just be exactly that in his new flick which does a damn good imitation of Die Hard and similar retro actioners.


We open on Nottingham in 1996 as we hover over the city at night before unhinged criminal Harry Archibald (Ian Hitchens) executes the city’s Mayor in an alley in a ruthless power move. But the whole incident is witnessed which sets in motion the story of Outlawed.


A local film of some flair, we are then whisked away to Afghanistan – via a CGI plane – and the first thing to note is the amazing production values of what could have been a homemade affair.


As the titles roll we get a parachute drop, a shoot-out and an impressive award ceremony. Whatever little money the filmmakers have is all up on screen and whilst the accents keep it firmly a Midlands film, the movie has far more Hollywood sheen than I was expecting.


This is partly the result of the fantastic professional look from the five cinematographers. The shadows, the lighting, the silhouettes and even the daytime shooting from the combined efforts of Robert Beck, Troy Edige, Will Price, Nico Turner and Louis Vella all make it incredibly visually interesting. They film Nottingham landmarks such as Trent Bridge, Nottingham City War Memorial and Nottingham Council House with great skill from the start.


Back to the story, we get to find out that commando Jake O’Neill returns from war to be offered a deal with Archibald now in his new position of power. After refusing he struggles to adjust to normal life and when he finds his girlfriend cheating on him, his life begins to spiral out of control.


However, when a girl from his past (Jessica Norris as Jade Roberts) contacts him to investigate her father’s death, he agrees but soon after a failed rescue mission in which a young boy loses his life, Jake completely self-destructs in orgies of drink and drugs. The film’s acting is solid but there are times when clichéd dialogue slips in a bit too often (“I’m not cut out to play happy families”, “welcome to the party” and “there’s no school like the old school”). These are quirky nods to other action films but seemed a bit too familiar in their repetition.


However, it’s the action – also influenced by 80s and 90s classics – that is most impressive here. A deal-gone-wrong at a car yard that ends in a violent shootout with machine guns and explosions and is impressively handled. And as the narrative steamrolls ahead – albeit a bit messily – there’s frankly no time to get bored at all.


A sequence of commandos tackling an armed group of hostage-takers filmed in an abandoned factory has echoes of Robocop and slews of bloodied guts hark back to Verhoeven’s other brutal classic Total Recall. A nice Wilhelm scream is a sly nod to old Hollywood stunt-work yet leads us to the amazing sound mixing. Outlawed has expertly handled the difficult balancing act of complex explosions and gun shots alongside the dialogue and is a joy to the ears as well as the eyes!


From a snow-covered graveyard to an impressive church, the sheer variety of visuals throughout is spectacular for this level of filmmaking. Only an operation room betrays the film’s production values. Yet, as we pick up Jake in his most dire of times, his dismissal means he heads to a casino to gamble. And with his tuxedo and liquor, Adam Collins could easily be considered for the next James Bond. Some racy sex scenes are sprinkled throughout and Collins’ natural charm on screen works well with the confidence shown behind the camera where he has utilised different influences from a genre he’s clearly passionate about.


And whilst the script could do with some polish, the film’s ending is a spectacular revenge action sequence as Jake rescues his loved one from the clutches of the villain. Getting to this point we have seen all the right pieces for a Hollywood actioner – sex, style, seedy goings on as well as guns, bullets and explosions. However, this breath-taking finale will satisfy and then some. The full rampant final sequence includes motorcycle stunts, snipers, fist fights, people on fire as well as grenades and a rocket launcher (!)


Filmmakers who feel the leap from the local to Hollywood is too huge a barrier should study Outlawed. With plenty of inventive filming techniques, the film is the kind of movie that can see filmmakers move from the independent scene to larger studio-helmed projects.


One of the hardest things for me here is to review the film as being at the high end of the low budget local film community OR the low end of the high budget film community. It straddles both which is actually a huge compliment. Fans of Olympus Has Fallen will enjoy this, but the film demonstrates how local filmmakers are no longer showing them to “just their mates” but creating movies vying for position on your shelf or in your Netflix playlist.


Certainly not without some flaws – most of which come from a handful of over-used genre clichés – Outlawed should be seen as a high benchmark for regional filmmakers looking to create feature films that can compete in the big leagues. Tackling a genre – action – that requires a high degree of skill and dexterity on technical aspects like stunts, special effects and fight choreography is also no easy task. The fact that Outlawed delivers plenty of all of these in spades is testament to the startling cinematic talents of all the incredible cast and crew. And action fans will love the high-octane thrills and shattering action all the way through.


Mike Sales


By midlandsmovies, Aug 24 2018 07:23AM

Thursday (2018)


Directed by Glenn McAllen-Finney


GM Finney Productions


Opening with a tied up and handcuffed female covered in blood, Thursday, the new film from Glenn McAllen-Finney, throws the audience straight into scenes of scary violence and life or death terror in this new Midlands crime drama.


With the use of a handheld camera technique and washed out colour palette, a mysterious man torments his captive with a monologue of evil intentions. And given her situation, it’s not long before fists are flying as she defies his demands not to scream in an attempt to escape. But how did these people get here and what are the enigmatic numbers he is demanding from his hostage?


Not shying from brutal scenes, Thursday concerns itself with Jade (played by Kelly McCormack) who is interrogated about an unknown set of secret numbers believed to be received from her deceased father. We are told these are needed in order to open a case with important company documents. Recalling the Tom Berenger/Cillian Murphy scene from Inception (movie-geek here knows them as 528491) this film may also be harking back to that movie with its use of an expressive orchestral score.


Although this is a nice change of musical tone for a local film and attempts to give the short some gravitas, it unfortunately sometimes moves scenes into melodrama. At more than one point, it overpowers the interesting conflicts which also may be down to a slightly muddled sound mix, and drowns out the all-important dialogue.


The tormentor however is played with spiteful malice by Sam Winterton who delivers a great, if slightly sometime over-the-top, Bond-villain style performance that captures a nasty menace punctuated with loud verbal outbursts.


More Nolan influences are seen in the film’s narrative structure. Whilst opening on the cell-based conversation, the film flashes forward and backward in time. When it does, the film’s colour palette changes to a much more natural colour – twisting the traditional black-and-white style and throwing the audience out of any cinematic familiarity.


Back in the past, we see a vibrant house party which begins to explain some of the events leading to the current predicament. With the surprising return of her father to the party, he demands she takes responsibility for her life and then exits quickly leaving us intrigued as to his intentions.


Containing a very different tone and style to the director’s previous film The Rockman, McFinney-Allen has moved from cheaper b-movie sci-fi thrills with this more mature drama. And done with some flair too. Whilst the film relies a bit too heavily of dialogue exposition – story beats are unashamedly spelled out for you – the filmmaker however uses his skills to avoid low budget pitfalls to get a lot of information over in the short 20-minute runtime. And as we shuffle back to the cell, some hidden truths are uncovered before the revelation of the numbers become clear in a satisfying conclusion.


With influences from Tarantino – McCormack is literally stuck in the middle with you throughout and we see the arrival of authorities towards the film’s conclusion – as well as Christopher Nolan, the filmmaker has tried to sprinkle some style from Hollywood genre flicks into a local film. A table-turning ending leaves the short with the audience wanting more and the film certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome.


With a bevy of strong performances, a mix of genre influences from the highbrow to the sleazy, Thursday ends up being an ambitious short which, whilst not always hitting its mark, is a first-rate film from a filmmaker developing his talents into much more complex and interesting territory.


Mike Sales


By midlandsmovies, Aug 19 2018 07:30AM



Midlands Review - Bare


Recently released from prison is Steven Arnold’s Bill who in flashback is revealed to have been violent to his partner in a new drama film called BARE from Staffordshire director Ash Morris.


Bill initially seems withdrawn and somewhat forlorn as he makes his way back to his neighbourhood with his brother Ryan (Rob Haythorn of TV series Waterloo Road). Returning to his mum’s home, the narrative is interspersed with scenes of chaotic frenzy as we see Bob in his prison cell on the night of his arrest.


“A real man wouldn’t hit his woman", his mother screams at him at breakfast and the reality of his new position contrasts starkly with Ash Morris’ directorial use of flashbacks, which are a dreamy haze of blood and fierceness. A female victim, who is also pregnant, is seen drenched in blood staring at her reflection in a mirror seemingly contemplating the events that have just occurred.


Some smoky slow-motion shadow boxing and a Rocky-esque run in park with grey tracksuit shows Bill’s roots in violence before the film guides us to the shocking event itself.


Without scrimping on the graphic nature of the attack, we are then whisked back to present where William in joined by Bruce Jones (of Coronation Street) – an old friend who makes disturbingly light conversation of Will’s drink and violent past. And perhaps future.


Strangely, as although the violence isn’t condoned in Bare, the minor suggestion that alcohol or a woman’s taunting provokes the outrage is somewhat problematic. As someone who has been trained on the Freedom Programme, it is well established that whilst a lowering of inhibitions is without question through drink, the dominator shouldn’t be excused from choices made. Here in Bare, the character’s inherent violent nature could have been made more overt aside from the obvious boxing analogy.


That said, the film provides no easy answers and a great shot of blood-soaked water in a bath is a strikingly memorable image. Again, Bare doesn’t shy away from the harshness with a grotesque shot of his pregnant partner discharging blood shocking the audience in its deliberate portrayal.



Nottingham writer, and award-winning novelist, Nicola Monaghan says a lot with a little dialogue and the story’s non-linear structure gives us a glimpse into the past and future which was edited with great dexterity and form. Sound mixer Rick Smith, also from Nottingham, has worked on the This is England TV show and the brutal fist crunching, screaming matches and music are edited together brilliantly to give the film an aural jolt.


As we come to the film’s conclusion, a slide into the world of illegal underground fighting leaves hints, albeit small ones, of a touch of redemption and remorse as the reality of the consequences of the decisions he has made becoming hauntingly prescient.


A harsh uncompromising drama, Bare never lets up with its violence, darkness and serious tone which may be too much for sensitive viewers. However, it lays bare some horrible truths about domestic violence and the nature of its perpetrators, condemning and contemplating the various aspects of such situations. With technical flair and high production values, Bare is a fantastic Midlands film drama with strong performances from the whole cast and themes that will plague you long after watching.


Mike Sales




Watch the Bare teaser trailer below:






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