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By midlandsmovies, Sep 19 2017 10:07AM



Midlands Professional - Birmingham actor Andre Pierre


Our Professional series continues as Midlands Movies chats to Andre Pierre – an actor form the region who shares his background and experience in the industry.


Mike finds out more about his past projects as well as his new major 2018 film “15 Minutes of War” directed by Fred Grivois.


The Midlands

Andre Pierre is a professional actor from Birmingham (West Midlands) and is represented by IPM (Imperial Personal Management). With over 7 years of acting experience, including workshops at The Crescent Theatre and Millennium Point, he took his experience to the Birmingham Theatre School before moving into short and feature films, TV and theatre.


“I have a variety of upcoming films coming up including sci-Fi drama “Graycon” directed by Duaine Carma Roberts, superhero TV pilot “Lucid The Dreamwalker”, an action thriller feature film “TONY” and an urban drama feature film called “Blitz In The Bitz” which are all premiering in October”.



Acting beginnings

“My foundation for acting in general started when I was 13. My first role into films was an educational short film called “My Life My Choice” and it was the first time I auditioned for any kind of film project. At the time I had no clue to how big and how much attention this film was going to receive”.


The trailer to the film went viral which was closely followed by a premiere at Star City in Birmingham. Andre Pierre continues, “Being part of this made me realise the power a film can have on people and was the turning point for me to become a professional actor. Since then I’ve had numerous leading and supporting roles”.


Exclusive Shot From Short Film “Last Night In Freedom” Directed By Click Jones Coming Soon
Exclusive Shot From Short Film “Last Night In Freedom” Directed By Click Jones Coming Soon

Overcoming Hurdles

“Staying committed regardless of how many no’s you receive sounds like a cliché but it’s very true in this industry. You have to have thick skin because part of your job is dealing with criticism from your audience, critics, directors, casting directors etc. You are going to judged by everyone and it’s something you cannot get past so you have to whole heartedly believe in yourself, believe in your talent and believe in your work ethic to reach the goals you set out for yourself”.




Superhero TV Pilot "Lucid The Dreamwalker" Directed By The Johnson Bros Coming Soon


Acting methods

“I always analyse the script and talk with the director first and foremost to make sure what direction they want the character to go in. But I always bring honesty and authenticity to my performances so want to make sure that you see the truth in the characters I’m playing. This needs to be related to the story so you are invested in them along their journey. I always try to see how my character moves and talks, how does he react in various situations etc so a lot of research in one or another. I always want my characters to be relatable, interesting and as grounded as possible to give the best performances”.


Challenges faced by actors on local films

“There are so many challenges it varies but it could be from noise being too loud on the location, actors dropping out at the last minute and filming days going on longer than expected. I would say, for actors, just prepare yourself for anything on an independent or short film because it’s all training grounds for the bigger platforms and it only helps you to get better at your craft when you go through these experiences”.

Andre Pierre Playing James From Feature Film “TONY” Directed By Jack Veasey
Andre Pierre Playing James From Feature Film “TONY” Directed By Jack Veasey

Acting experiences

“I think my best acting experience was filming in Morocco for the feature film “15 Minutes Of War” (15 Minutes De Guerre). It has been my first role filming abroad but also my first big role on a film on this scale with so much action, working with a Hollywood actress and rising movie stars as well as a critically acclaimed director. It’s been like nothing I’ve ever done before. I was developing the character, learning the language and filming the first week in Casablanca before shooting the rest of the film in Marrakech in the desert which was challenging within itself but also a pure joy I will never forget. The worst experience was not being fully prepared for an audition when I was starting out. It was so horrible [laughs] but it was also a learning curve for me to always to be ready and give yourself enough time to prepare for auditions in the future. I made sure that never happened again”.


Advice for beginners

“The best advice I can pass on is to try and get some form of training whether it’s in drama or theatre school, performing arts courses or acting workshops. This training gives you the foundation and tools to become the best performer possible. Using Star Now or Mandy (Casting Call Pro) are good for getting started to find some form of work as well. Another alternative route is to find friends that are making films and get involved - or even just create your own films”.


Best advice from others

“I was told to ‘risk everything’ and what I take from that is you have to risk looking like an idiot at times to bring out the best performance. There’s been many times where either the director or I had to push myself even further to bring out my full potential and sometimes you might think that’s not normal or you might be self conscious. That is the very thing what pushes it from good to great so I would always say push past your comfort zone. Now, when I’m usually fearful of something I haven’t done before, it only encourages me to do better and discover new skills about myself I thought I didn’t have”.


A Shot From Short Film “The Glove Game: Beginning” Directed By Josh Bliss
A Shot From Short Film “The Glove Game: Beginning” Directed By Josh Bliss

Future plans

“The future is looking very bright for next year and beyond. I’ll be in a lot more feature films and TV shows. My work is already opening up more opportunities than I ever imagined so I will be in fewer short films than before. The journey has been full of many surprises and I feel very blessed and thankful to be in this position right now”.


Final words

“I would say that you have to believe in yourself first and foremost and love the craft because this journey won’t be easy. It’s not going to happen overnight so enjoy the process, enjoy the journey and learn as much as you can from other creatives. Don’t wait on that big opportunity to come to you work towards it now whether it’s being part of theatre or short and independent films but get yourself out there and make your career happen!”.


Check out more from Andre Pierre on his Spotlight page here: https://www.spotlight.com/interactive/cv/0811-3493-3372


A Shot From Horror Short Film “Bless You” Directed By Daryl Grizzle



Midlands Movies Mike

By midlandsmovies, Jun 27 2017 02:56PM



The Telephone (2017)

Directed by Stuart Connock Wheeldon

Nine Ladies Film


A simple piano refrain and shots of quirky antiquities opens new horror short The Telephone from Nine Ladies Film.


With a more experimental introduction than previous films, Wheeldon has used images to create a sense of intrigue as we cross-jump shot-to-shot between seemingly random items and a list of missing persons before settling down for the tale.


Nigel Barber (as Max) is shown as a tormented artist scrawling Pollock-esque paint ejaculations across a canvas, before a parallel narrative shows a man (Bern Deegan as Richard) in a red telephone box. What follows is a series of eerie dream sequences experienced by Richard and as we receive these uncertain errors with him, the audience begins to ask if these are real or imagined. Or are they even glimpses of the past?


Well, Richard turns out to be a journalist investigating the disappearances highlighted at the film’s start but the relationship between him and the mysterious Max is intentionally vague. The constant telephone ringing provides an interesting background noise to the (hinted-upon) mental torment that Barber and Bern are encountering as well.


The main narrative is only hinted at, with the audience having to do much of the work as the jarring edits and almost non-existent dialogue create a mysterious puzzle that I hope most viewers would throw themselves into.


The music is great if a little overpowering at times and is edited higher in the mix than the sound effects – mainly the title’s ‘buzzing’ telephone – but the cleverly constructed angles and shots maintain a good sense of intrigue. Black and white flashbacks keeps the visuals appealing and the film had the suburban weirdness of Ben Wheatley’s Kill List and even a bit of Nic Roeg thrown in there too.


A big change of style for the local filmmaker, the short film definitely prioritises atmosphere and feeling over narrative. Personally I found the lack of story a bit frustrating at the start, but the film clarifies further in the second half and answers some of the uncertainties but also cleverly leaves you hanging on a number of points.


Some may be put off by the dream/nightmare-like randomness of the plot threads but I recommend putting any doubts ‘on hold’ for a high-concept hazy nightmare. In the end, The Telephone ends up being a great calling card for Wheeldon and a huge leap forward for the director in style and visual story-telling.


Midlands Movies Mike


Watch the full short on the Vimeo video below:




By midlandsmovies, Jun 20 2017 08:19AM

Just Desserts (2017)

Dir. Liam Banks


The latest offering from Superfreak Media is Just Desserts, a slapstick comedy short reminiscent of the silent films of the past.


Directed by Midlands filmmaker Liam Banks, Just Desserts plays out a night in a restaurant which is occupied by a man and his girlfriend, the waiter, a lone woman and a man who just wants his soup.


Watching this short reminded me of Charlie Chaplin’s early work or The Marx Brothers as the characters are exposed to physical comedy as a way to express their situation. The waiter struggles to keep his restaurant calm and serene as his customer’s private lives take centre stage.


The attention to detail and the clear effort gone into making this short is what really sells itself to the viewer. I was glued for the entire five-minute running time, appreciating every aspect of the production as well as enjoying watching a genre that doesn’t get enough exposure in the modern climate.


The cinematography and editing are evocative of those classic silent films, the grainy “old film reel” look of the film is consistent throughout the film and is one of my favourite elements of the film, whilst the editing employs the slightly sped up effect to emulate how early silent films were shown.


Complimenting what is shown visually is the original music by Pav Gekko which is a fantastic piece of music in its own right.


However, I don’t think the film would have been successful if the actors were not game. The cast, Adam Read, Melvyn Rawlinson, Steve Wood, Sarah Wynne Kordas (who also wrote the short) and Karen Best were professional and managed to keep a straight face throughout something I would have struggled to do!


Liam Banks, known mostly for his work in the Horror genre, shows that his talents are vast and can go beyond terrifying his audience, he can also make them laugh.


Guy Russell

By midlandsmovies, Jun 15 2017 10:16AM



Summer Nights outdoor film screenings head to the Midlands


Seven years in and the Summer Nights Film Festival is back at thirteen locations across Derbyshire and the UK. Presented by QUAD on an inflatable twelve metre screen, Summer Nights Festival screenings offer the chance to enjoy the great outdoors for a unique cinematic experience.


New venues for 2017 include Clumber Park in Nottinghamshire and additional nights have been added to some Midlands venues, including Wollaton Hall in Nottingham and Baddesley Clinton, in Warwickshire. Derbyshire venues are Kedleston Hall, Calke Abbey and Hardwick Hall.


The full list of Midlands dates, venues and films for the summer are below:


Kedleston Hall, in Derbyshire is showing Bridget Jones’ Baby (15) on Friday 21st July and The Legend Of Tarzan (12A) on Saturday 22nd July.


Baddesley Clinton, in Warwickshire is showing Dirty Dancing (12A) on Thursday 27th July, Fantastic Beasts (12A) on Friday 28th July and Pretty Woman (15) on Saturday 29th July.


Calke Abbey, in Derbyshire is showing Mamma Mia (PG) on Thursday 3rd August, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (12A with subtitles) on Friday 4th August and Footloose (12A) on Saturday 5th August.


Clumber Park, in Nottinghamshire is showing Dirty Dancing (12A) on Friday 4th August and Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves (12A) on Saturday 5th August.


Hardwick Hall, in Derbyshire is showing La La Land (12A) on Friday 18th August and Top Gun (12A) on Saturday 19th August.


Wollaton Hall, in Nottingham is showing Moulin Rouge (12A) on Thursday 24th August, Pretty Woman (15) on Friday 25th August, Jurassic Park (PG) on Saturday 26th August, The Dark Knight Rises (12A subtitled) on Sunday 27th August and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (12A) on Monday 28th August.


Belton House, in Lincolnshire is showing Pretty Woman (15) on Friday 8th and Top Gun (12A) on Saturday 9th September.


Standard tickets cost £13 for adults or £9 for under 12s, tickets for children aged under five years are free.


For more information on films, venues or to book tickets, please call QUAD Box Office on 01332 290606 or go to www.summernightsfilm.co.uk


Summer Nights Film Festival has also teamed up with award winning artisan food specialist Hackwood Farm, based in Radbourne, Derby, who are offering pre-ordered traditional wicker picnic hampers for two people packed with tasty traditional picnic fare and including a blanket, glasses, plates and cutlery. You can pre-order their hamper when purchasing their Summer Nights tickets. There will also be drinks and desserts available on the night at selected venues from Bobby’s Bar and Flow Catering. Please see the Summer Nights website for full details.


By midlandsmovies, May 4 2017 11:20AM



Tony Gibbons is an established actor hailing from our very own region with a string of prominent roles in Midlands films and beyond. With award-winning Checking In and the forthcoming House of Screaming Death already in the bag, Tony is now developing his career in America. In this new interview, Midlands Movies Mike speaks to the actor about his influences, method and forthcoming projects.


Midlands Movies: Hi Tony. How are things in the Midlands for you right now?

Tony Gibbons: Great thanks Mike!


MM: I know you’ve been out in Los Angeles recently so are you from the region at all?

TG: Yes...I'm born and bred in Wolverhampton! But now spend a lot of my time in Los Angeles working on projects there.


MM: That must have been quite the change from Wolverhampton?! Which do you prefer, Hollywood or The Midlands?

TG: You could say that! I actually love both. Obviously Wolves is my home but I lived and worked in Manchester and London, too, before making the move to LA...and I've started to make a home out in the sunshine, too.


MM: And what about the work? How does working in Hollywood compare to working in the Midlands?

TG: Right now most of my work is in the US, and I feel really lucky to be working on bigger and bigger projects and getting to work alongside amazing acting talent and film makers, but I love working back home to work when I can, too. We have so much talent in the Midlands! I think some of the best film makers in Europe are from the Midlands. I've been fortunate to work with Dave Hastings on 'Checking In' and 'The House of Screaming Death', and that whole team is a credit to our area and the industry, and I think Liam Banks is one of the most exciting young film makers out there today – and I got to work with him, too, on 'The Copy-Writer'! I'm hoping to work with them both again soon.


MM: Do you (or the projects you choose) specialise in any genres?

TG: I love working on all types of projects and never planned to work in just one genre, but if you look at my recent credits it certainly looks like I specialise in horror and sci-fi! I did the US TV show 'My Haunted House', then 'House of Screaming Death' with the wonderful Dave Hastings back here in the Midlands, and 'Rogue Warrior: Robot Fighter', a sci-fi action epic that's about to be released in the US, and another US feature I just booked the lead in is very sci-fi, too!


MM: Any particular faves though?

TG: I have to say I have been enjoying the action/horror/sci-fi stuff – it’s a lot of fun to shoot! - but I also enjoy working in other genres, and love anything with true to life characters and emotion, like 'Checking In', which was very much a character driven drama.


MM: Spreading yourself across a wide range of projects – and geographical locations – you must have come up against different challenges. What has been the most difficult one you have overcome?

TG: Actually, for me it was probably “coming out” as an actor. I was a sports kid, and wanted to be a footballer most of my life, and then went to University to do a Law degree. So when I told my parents – half way through my degree – that “I think I want to take acting classes”, it was definitely a shock! I had never shown any interest in drama at school, but I felt this pull towards acting that I couldn't really explain. Once I started training, and working, I never looked back, so I'd say to young actors to follow their hearts and put the work in. Oh, and be patient!



MM: How do you like to work with directors? Any good (or bad) experiences?

TG: I must have been very lucky because most of my experiences have been overwhelmingly positive. I've heard some horror stories from other sets, but I've never had a problem with a director. When I was starting out I used to always want more direction. Like, they wouldn't give me any so I didn't know if what I was doing was good or not, but now I love working with those types of directors. If they've cast you, it’s because they like what you do, so it becomes much more collaborative, letting you do your thing as an actor and bring your own contributions to the table. That's what I've experienced on all my most successful projects, like 'Checking In', 'The Cup of Wrath', and 'Rogue Warrior'. There's probably good reason why these directors are award winning!


MM: Out of your many, many, film and stage projects, what has been your greatest success?

TG: Playing Macbeth on stage, early in my career is something I don't think will ever stop being a highlight for me. It was a wonderful experience and something that has stayed with me throughout my career. Over the past couple of years I have been so lucky have worked on projects that have had massive success. Winning Best British Film at the London Film Awards with (the Midlands made) 'Checking In' was incredible, and being invited to attend the Cannes Film Festival with 'The Cup of Wrath' is the sort of thing every actor dreams about. I feel extremely fortunate to be able to do something I love as a career, and honestly, every project I work on feels like the next achievement.


MM: And besides acting, what else have you been up to?

TG: I'm actually really excited because I was recently asked by a couple of industry publications to write 'expert advice' columns. My first article was just published on Backstage, and I'm going to be writing some more, both for Backstage and a couple of other trade outlets. I'm also really excited to be part of the Birmingham Film Festival. I'm working with them as a judge, and get to watch lots of great movies in doing so!


MM: And looking over the horizon, what’s in Tony’s future plans?

TG: Work, work, work! I just recently booked an amazing role in a movie that I'll be shooting this Summer in the US, which I can't wait to start work on. I have a few other US projects lined up after that, too, but also hope to pop back home some time to work on something else in the Midlands!


MM: That sounds perfect to me and the region and its talent would more than welcome you back with open arms. All the best for the future.

TG: Thanks, it’s been great.


Check out further information on Tony and his latest projects by clicking and following on the links below:


http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2971362


http://www.allstarsactors.tv/listing/tony-gibbons/


https://twitter.com/tonygibbons5?lang=en

By midlandsmovies, Mar 12 2017 09:37AM

Midlands Movies at the Beeston Film Festival 2017


Midlands Movies headed just up the road from our base in Leicester to take our first ever look at the Beeston Festival which is now in its 3rd year and has become a popular entry into the ever-growing festival scene in the region. Editor Mike Sales jumped on the train for the Saturday session of the 4-day festival to catch up with the talent in the Midlands.


Since its inception in 2015 the Beeston Festival has grown from a small evening event to a multi-day extravaganza that showcases not only features, shorts and animations from the area but has also attracted the attention of national and international filmmakers as well.


Despite this growth, the festival has not lost its grass-roots feel taking place as it does upstairs at the White Lion Bar in the centre of the town. Films fans can catch the variety of skilled artists in the comfortable surroundings of the venue allowing the festival to grow yet still very much intimate and home-grown.


Some of the films screened at this year’s fest are Midlands Movies Awards winners and nominees Hinterland (Jess O’ Brien), Beige (written by Dan Weatherer), Dolls (Keith Allott) and Night Owls (from Sophie Black) and these are of course just a handful of many more being played at the festival. As an attendee I was lucky enough to catch even more great films from the region and beyond and the small relaxed atmosphere makes it easier – if not somewhat compulsory – to chat and network with the film’s makers themselves.



The full 4 day line up consisted of the Three Counties night focusing on local films (Thursday), the festival Horror night (Friday), drama (Saturday) and the final day on Sunday has animation, comedy and the prestigious Beeston Festival Awards.


Festival organiser John Currie made everyone feel welcome and a mix of filmmakers, writers and viewers were in the audience to enjoy both the local and the worldwide gems on offer.


Upstairs in the venue’s function room, a full capacity crowd enjoyed a number of films on Saturday for the drama category that was the focus. ‘The Buzzing of a Bumblebee’ was one of the first films I caught. A half-hour Russian film about a nursing home, the film had gorgeous cinematography whilst British film ‘Butterfly’ hit home with its story of an epileptic swimmer called Jane who has tough decisions to make in her life.




During the break I caught up with Sophie Black of Triskelle pictures (www.triskellepictures.co.uk) who gave an update on the post-production of her new project “Songbird” whilst introducing me to Adam Anwi, one of the many exciting Beeston Festival judges. Neil Oseman was also in attendance as director of photography on Night Owls which was shown earlier this week.


Another judge – who must have had very difficult decisions to select festival winners – was horror aficionado Gino Van Hecke from Zeno films (www.zenopictures.be). Having met festival organiser John Currie at an Indian film festival, the latter invited the former to the region cementing the truly international nature of this intimate festival. After the hustle and bustle of the chaotic Indian festival, Gino was impressed by the smaller but more personal tone of this event.


“The Indian festival we met at had to be moved inside because of weather and went on so long that people ran to the buffet when it was my turn to take to the stage”, he describes whilst laughing. “It was great fun though and I got to meet John and others and that’s how I’ve ended up here”.




Zeno films are a Belgium company who specialise in horror and Gino explained how his company are hoping to work towards producing a ‘Best of Beeston” DVD-anthology together to help give the films and filmmakers involved even more exposure. “I am a fan of horror having released Rubber (horror film about a killer tyre) in Belgium but I’ve enjoyed the whole fest so far and look forward to working with the team in future”.


Midlands Movies hometown of Leicester was also well represented on Saturday with Mike Yeoman from comedy film company FlipYou Productions whose film Parenthood was screened Thursday. www.flipyou.co.uk


Also in attendance was Melvyn Rawlinson, an actor as well as a filmmaker. Melvyn has created documentaries on the history of puppetry – especially Punch and Judy – as well as on the sensitive subject of dementia, an issue that is very personal to me. However, Toton based Melvyn was here in the main to support his appearance in “I am God, And Severely Underqualified” directed by Theo Gee.


As the second round of films began in the afternoon I got to see Just Words – a police investigation from Russia as well as solid dramas Squares and Transmission and others. Again each film demonstrated the high level of quality and it was credit to all of the organisers and volunteers as well as the venue’s staff that things ran smoothly.


Having to leave slightly earlier than planned, I was disappointed not to have been able to stay longer but it gave me a great excuse to return to this fantastic festival in 2018.


With a great sense of community, the Beeston Film Festival is a prize jewel and should be on every filmmaker’s list of events to submit films to each year. But much more than that, the festival has a great centre of attention on the ‘local’ that makes it all the more special for the Midlands.


For further information and much more, please check out the official Beeston Film Festival website at http://festival.beestonfilm.com/


Or follow at Twitter on @BeestonFilm


Midlands Movies Mike




By midlandsmovies, Mar 5 2017 09:51PM



Just Charlie (2017)

Directed by Rebekah Fortune


A gifted footballer struggles with her identity as she becomes more and more aware that they are a girl trapped inside a boy's body, while her family and friends also try their best to come to terms with these changes.


When young footballing talent Charlie (Harry Gilby) receives an offer for a trial at his county's football team it would appear that he quite literally has the world at his feet. If he plays his cards right, his future could be sorted.


However, a life of luxury doing what he loves is more daunting to Charlie than one would initially think it would be. Trapped in the body of a boy, Charlie is painfully torn between living up to his father's expectations and following the life he never could, and shedding his ill-fitting skin.


When he unintentionally fronts up to his family, Charlie's action threatens to tear his family apart forever. Just Charlie is a Midlands-based project that takes a look at the story of a young boy who is a young girl at heart. It is a wonderfully made film that sensitively deals with an issue that has recently started to have more and more light shed on it.


I really enjoyed a number of the performances here, although I absolutely must start off by saying hat's off to young Harry Gilby for his portrayal of Charlie here. For a first appearance in a feature length film he did a terrific job. It was a truly brilliant performance that I think showed real maturity on Gilby's behalf. I think a lot of very experienced actors would have to seriously consider taking on a role such as this because it is a very sensitive issue that has only really become something that has started to be discussed publicly very recently.


There is potentially a lot that could go wrong when someone plays a transgender person as there is such a huge number of ways the role could be unknowingly mishandled. For me though, Gilby did a very good job of portraying Charlie, so kudos to him.


Scot Williams played Charlie's dad, and again, this was another blinding performance. Some of his scenes with Gilby were horrible to watch, but this had such an impact on me as a viewer. I cannot begin to imagine the toll that a situation such as the one presented here in the film must take on a family, but if I were to try to, the results would come pretty close to so many of the scenes that the two actors shared here.


As difficult and upsetting as they were to watch at times, they really did the job very well. Williams managed to play Paul in a way that meant you didn't view him as a heartless idiot, but as a man who was grieving in some way, meaning you were able to empathise with him somewhat.


I have to praise writer Peter Machen on the story he created for the film. He managed to write something that covered just a bout all bases of Charlie's life - home, school, football, and everything in between. He also managed to do all this without making the film feel as thought it was trying to be much bigger than it actually was. While it may have branched out and touched upon the issue in a variety of settings, the story still felt personal and intimate enough for you to really be drawn into it.


All in all, Just Charlie is a beautiful film that pulls no punches in delivering it's message, yet still brings everything back round for a happy ending (or should I really say beginning in this case?). The top notch writing covers so many things while the truthful performances do a great job in tying everything together very nicely indeed. This is a touching journey of a film that is definitely worth every moment spent watching it.


Kira Comerford

By midlandsmovies, Mar 3 2017 08:24AM



BoXed (2017)

Directed by Daniel A. Finney


BoXeD accomplishes what every filmmaker sets out to do in the first ten minutes. It interests the viewer, pulls them in, keeps them guessing.


Sledgehammer Films presents BoXeD a mystery surrounding Rachel Porter (Jane Hamlet) whose sister Hope (Hetty Bentley) is missing.


We see Rachel dealing with her day to day life whilst trying to come to terms with the fact she may never know what has happened to her sister. The search for Hope takes Rachel on a whirlwind journey, dark moments and the return of on unwelcome figure.


Whilst BoXeD wouldn’t fall into classic film noir territory, I couldn’t help feeling a “noir” vibe whilst watching BoXeD. The viewer is never ahead of the film and is fully invested in its main character (Rachel).


Also the film is shot brilliantly in black and white, which is another staple in the sub-genre of “film noir”.


As the film opens the viewer is treated to the fantastic shots of a bay/river with an original, fresh score to accompany. The music and the cinematography were two of the strongest and my favourite elements of BoXeD, I felt the quality of both really elevated the film and complimented each other incredibly well. The score is composed by Mark Cornwell who also impresses on acting duty as Nicholas in the film.

Daniel A. Finney as well as shooting the film also directed, wrote and edited the feature.


Another aspect of the film that stood out was the scene in the hospital, filming in a busy hospital would not have been easy work but is evident that this was worth it as it gives this independent film added gravitas that not many can boast of.


When Rachel is told she has to identify a body that could be her sister, she arrives at the hospital to look. This is an important scene in the film, I think one of the reasons why it works so well is the authenticity of the location.


The other reason is Jane Hamlet who portrays Rachel, when an actor is required to be in nearly every scene they have to command the audience’s attention, Hamlet seems to do this with ease.


Director Daniel A. Finney seems to have a talent for directing actors as Charles O’Neill who portrays the tricky Richie Prendergast also shines, his arrival in the film comes just in time to keep the film fresh and interesting.


Because this is a mystery film there is quite a bit of dialogue throughout its run time. To keep up the viewer has to understand what is being said and where the plot is going, for me the only criticism would be the sound was not at its clearest in some scenes, the early visit from the detective for example. This could be intentional as bad news had just been given to Rachel so maybe the filmmakers intention was to have her block out people talking around her.


As the film is a mystery it would be unfair for me to divulge the filmmaker’s secrets, instead I would recommend you seek out this unique quiet drama for yourself to enjoy.


I look forward to seeing what the cast and crew have in store after this impressive independent feature.


Guy Russell


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