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By midlandsmovies, Nov 19 2018 07:37AM

Movie themed events at Leicester Comedy Fest 2019


I swear it comes round quicker every year but it certainly gets bigger and better every year, so here we are once again providing you with some of the highlights of Leicester’s infamous Comedy Festival.


Running from Wednesday 6th February to Sunday 24th February 2019 the festival hosts a whole cavalcade of excellent events across the city in a now amazing 70 (!) venues.


And whilst there are comedy and hilarious shows of all types and genres – with something for everyone – as always we have checked out the festival programme to bring you a list of the best of the festival shows with a movie or cinematic theme for our film buff readers out there.


Without further ado please check out these fantastic looking events and for more shows and to purchase tickets please head to http://www.comedy-festival.co.uk/




The Big Lewbowski: Presented by Edy Hurst and Cinema Para-Discount

Attenborough Arts Centre

9th February

Cinema Para-Discount is a film night like no other, comedians are given the chance to create an interactive screening that enhances a film of their choice. Edy Hurst is an award-winning musical comedian. Armed with a guitar, loop pedal and assortment of DIY props, he'll be providing comic commentary on his favourite film, The Big Lebowski. Watch and help Edy bring the film to life with an alternate sound track and interactive games.




Robin Hood and the Revolting Peasants

The Y Theatre

10th February

With no less than 2 films related to the infamous Midlands legend heading our way in 2018, come join Robin, Little John, Maid Marion and Friar Tuck as they take on some of their hardest challenges to date: A conniving king, a sinister sheriff and a downtrodden village of peasants who's 'get up and go' has got up and gone. Can the merry band teach the baddies a lesson? The villagers to revolt? The world to sing? Find out when Oddsocks rumble in with the adventures of this legendary folk hero in a show for all the family. Suitable for ages 7+




The Just Us League: Improvengers Assemble

Grays @LCB Depot

10th February

IMPROVENGERS ASSEMBLE: The UK's premiere nerd-comedy duo, The Just Us League, bring their brand new show to Leicester Comedy Festival. Improvengers Assemble is the fully improvised Marvel-based comedy show. All the heroes. All the villains. Your story.




Nathan Cassidy: My Shawshank Redemption

The Cookie

14th February

On the film's 25th anniversary, award-winning comedian Cassidy with a stand-up show to the soundtrack of a masterpiece. Love can hold you prisoner. Crawling through sh*t can set you free. Happy Valentine's Day! 'Relentlessly laugh out loud, hilarious.' Edinburgh Eve News 2018 'Stormingly good' Kate Copstick 2018 'Piercingly sarcastic jibes have a touch of Stewart Lee' Chortle 2017




Rik Carranza: Star Trek vs Star Wars

O’Neills

14th February

The hit film-related show of Edfringe 2016, 2017 and 2018 comes to Leicester! Rik Carranza guides two comedians through the ultimate comedy panel show that boldly goes to a galaxy far, far away. Kirk vs Solo, Klingon vs Wookie, Neelix vs Jar Jar Binks? There can only be one winner and you, the audience, decide. 'Exceptionally nerdy and hysterically funny' FringeBiscuit.co.uk 'Fun for geeks and all' **** Voice Mag.




Action Figure Archive with Steve McLean

Grays @LCB Depot

17th February

Steve opens his old toy box and rediscovers your faves from He-Man, Transformers, Star Wars and many more (about three more). Remember when toys were better? Your memory might be playing tricks on you. Action Figure Archive is a hit with audiences and the critics alike - ''A hilarious walk down memory lane'' The Scotland Herald, ''A fun examination of nostalgia and nerdiness'' Wired Magazine. "Geeks and nerds unite in this fun show" Geek-List.




The Extraordinary Time-Travelling Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Attenborough Arts Centre

21st/22nd/23rd February

Amazing tales elegantly told. Made into an 80s cult classic by ex-Python Terry Gilliam, this version of the tale has top award-winning comedians and improvisors telling extravagant stories all based on the Adventures of Baron Munchausen. There will be swords, and duels, and elephants and castles built of cheese, and all of it is completely and irrefutably true. Leicester Comedy Festival "Best Children's Show 2018" Nominee.




Hats off to Laurel & Hardy

The Guildhall

22nd February

With the new Midlands-made and Steve Coogan-starring film from John Baird soon to be released, the award-winning Lucky Dog bring their internationally renowned biopic about the best-loved comedy duo of all-time back to Leicester Guildhall. Widely regarded as being the most accurate show ever written about The Boys, it is the closest thing you can get to seeing the original pair in action. Be prepared to laugh your socks off before having your heart broken.




Comedy Film Show – Some Like it Hot

Harborough Theatre

22nd February

Some Like It Hot (12) (1959) Director: Billy Wilder. Starring: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon. After witnessing a Mafia murder, slick saxophone player Joe (Tony Curtis) and his long-suffering buddy, Jerry (Jack Lemmon), improvise a quick plan to escape from Chicago with their lives in the comedic cinema classic. Disguising themselves as women, they join an all-female jazz band and hop a train bound for sunny Florida. 116 mins.




Comedy Film Show – Blues Brothers

Harborough Theatre

22nd February

The Blues Brothers (15). After the release of Jake Blues (John Belushi) from prison, he and brother Elwood (Dan Aykroyd) learn the Archdiocese will stop supporting their former school and will sell the place to the Education Authority. The only way to keep the place open is if the $5000 tax on the property is paid. The Blues Brothers want to help and decide to put their blues band back together and raise the money by staging a big gig. 142mins




David Benson Q & A: My Life with Kenneth Williams

The Angel Hotel

24th February

Join actor/comedian David Benson and Festival Director Geoff Rowe, as they chat about David's admiration of comedy Carry On legend Kenneth Williams. David's semi-autobiographical, award-winning show "Think No Evil Of Us" has become a regular fixture on the UK theatre circuit, and London's West End, and this talk will help reveal how David's unusual childhood led to an extraordinary connection with the Carry On star. Price includes afternoon tea.




The Laurel & Hardy Cabaret

The Guidhall

23rd/24th February

This spin-off cabaret is a bumper package of routines, sketches, songs and dances from The Boys' lengthy career which you won't find in the biopic. Including all their Music Hall scripts from their UK Tours between 1947-1954 and a lot of other rare material, it's the closest you will get to seeing the original pair in action.


Mike Sales



By midlandsmovies, Oct 12 2018 01:10PM

Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018) Dir. Peyton Reed


What I was most surprised with in this new instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe was that the film was directed by Peyton Reed. By that I mean as the helmer of the first film, Reed replaced Edgar Wright but in some ways his quick editing style aped Wright’s chaotic cutting.


However, whether Reed has tried to infuse his own design from the beginning to give the film some weight – away from the soap opera scale of the earlier film – the movie loses a lot of charm along the way.


In this sequel, Ant-Man Scott Lang (a likeable Paul Rudd) is under house arrest after the events of Civil War but decides to join Hope van Dyne (a feisty Evangeline Lilly) and her father Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) to try and recover her mother and his wife Janet from the sub-atomic Quantum Realm. But in their quest they cross Hannah John-Kamen as Ava Starr, a molecular shifting ‘Ghost’ aiming to use their technology to stabilise her body.


The size changing aspect in Ant-Man and the Wasp is pushed to the forefront here. Their laboratory is the major McGuffin that changes hands over and over again when shrunk to the size of a briefcase – and car chases are a fantastic mix of smash-ups as vehicles are shrunk to Micro Machine size. The villain however is a bit of a non-starter and continues Marvel’s interestingly designed but rather dull and forgettable antagonists (see Ronan the Accuser too).


Unfortunately, other than a handful of solid action scenes – Evangeline Lilly’s The Wasp is given a much meatier role and has the best scraps in the movie – the dialogue scenes are filmed in an incredibly flat style with even a hint of sepia-colour grading which really fails to help find the amusing tone of the first. Again, Reed takes his film in his own direction but one that sadly doesn’t really work.


Certainly not “bad” in the traditional sense, I have to admit I was expecting some more “fun” in its delivery so when the trio of Lang, Van Dyne and Pym attempt to retrieve Janet (played with class by the always-dependable Michelle Pfeiffer) I began to think that Ant-Man and The Wasp were secondary characters. The film seemed to hint upon a much more interesting plot focusing on Douglas and Pfeiffer’s story. These legends were never going to be the stars of Marvel’s kid-friendly Hollywood blockbuster but their performances give the film heart, gravitas and wit.


Laurence Fishburne moves from DC to Marvel to show up as another antagonist of sorts – again, as part of Hank’s tumultuous history and not Scott’s – and their dynamic and opposing moralities about developing technology were another highlight. Rudd and Lily’s chemistry is solid and I’ve always been an advocate for a bit more ‘love’ in the Marvel Universe. So their platonic AND romantic relationship adds a feisty layer that also gives their crises some heft when danger approaches.


The visual effects are of course top notch. I’d go so far to say that the Michael Douglas de-aging in the first Ant-Man may be one of the best CGI creations of all time. And although high-quality effects are quite standard for Marvel at this point – Black Panther's rubbery characters aside – the size shifting aspects ensure there’s a little bit more creativity when things get dicey for our heroes.


Away from that action though, I could label the film easily forgettable and, at times, certainly a little bland. With there being talk of a film set within Hank’s past, that was the film that this film left me wanting to see. And so this tale felt like a set up to that far more complex story. Therefore it sadly ends up sitting in the trivial middle ground of the MCU alongside Dr. Strange and Thor: The Dark World.


In the end the movie goes for mammoth but throwaway thrills over small-scale drama with a tone that moves away from its predecessor to become another plain entry into the Marvel cannon.


6.5/10


Mike Sales


By midlandsmovies, Sep 3 2018 08:50AM

To celebrate the UK home media release of Marvel's Avengers: Infinity War Midlands Movies held a competition where one lucky winner would take home an Avengers bundle of goodies.


With 100 entrants, we drew one winner out at random on the day of release 3rd September and the winner is...


Twitter user...@nelly0777


CONGRATULATIONS! Please get in touch to claim your prize and thanks to everyone who entered into the draw.


Follow Midlands Movies on Twitter for the next exciting competition draw coming soon!


Midlands Movies



By midlandsmovies, Apr 28 2018 10:06AM



Avengers: Infinity War (2018) Dir. Anthony & Joe Russo


17 films and 10 years later, here we go with the big enchilada coming to town in Disney’s Marvel’s Kevin Feige's The Avengers: Infinity War MCU franchise behemoth. As large as that sounds, the film is even larger and with a huge number of characters that we’ve grown with every step of the way the film had a very difficult balancing act but thankfully, mostly gets it spot on.


So what’s the deal here with this new $350 million gargantuan? As most fans would already know, but as a recap for the uninitiated, there have been hints of the Infinity Gems throughout the Marvel films and in this culmination of their story arc, a giant world-conquering warlord known as Thanos (a CGI Josh Brolin) wants to get his hands on all 6 of them in order to rule the galaxy. It may sound simple but the Russos do a great job in giving Thanos an understandable and subtle backstory, faults and all, and Brolin’s performance comes through much more than the purple Bruce Willis version of the trailer.


The film then follows various groups trying to prevent his life-ending goal throughout the universe – Iron Man and Spider-Man hitch a lift on a ship and jet off into space with Dr. Strange, whilst Thor crosses paths with the Guardians and Captain America and friends seek sanctuary in Wakanda.


The film is overstuffed, and slightly overlong, but that was always going to be an issue with trying to give so many characters some screen time but the Russos fast-paced editing jumps from one place to another making the disparate superhero gangs and their individual goals easy to understand. Tonally, it holds up too although it heavily relies on the serious scene/funny comment schtick that has subsequently got really stale since the first Guardians introduced it.


In the negative column there’s a few absences but I understand the need to trim here and there and audiences are always going to want to see more of their favourites. Hawkeye and Ant-Man are completely jettisoned whilst Black Widow is STILL being underused despite being present since Marvel’s third film. C’mon Feige – give the excellent Johansson her own film for once!


Steve Rogers appears an hour in and his emergence from the shadows was a huge moment of cheer. I have to mention again how Chris Evans’ steely and righteous performances as Cap has turned into one of the defining roles in the whole series (see Civil War review) and anchors the film(s) much more than I think most realise.


Infinity War also dips its toe into everything established before – Thor’s ancestry, Guardians’ 70s music, Wakanda’s glorious savannahs and Stark’s battle with technology and so the film feels a bit like a Greatest Hits album. All the boxes are ticked and at times it feels a little bit too familiar. It certainly didn’t have the wow factor of Wheedon’s inaugural Avengers film when the superheroes met for the first time.


That said, Greatest Hits albums are no bad thing. Classic character after classic character appears on screen and if you’re not too bothered about one particular superhero, its fast pace means another will be along soon. Here the film suffers slightly as I mentioned before, with no-one given that much room to breathe owing to the volume of characters. The one exception strangely is probably Thanos himself. His story is fleshed out in flashback with his daughters Gamora (sci-fi legend Zoe Saldana) and Nebula (Karen Gillan) in an emotional intensity rarely seen in the MCU.


Speaking of relationships, the Russos have dug deep to give these characters finally some romantic interest – a part of human nature that has been sorely lacking over the years. The films have already established fierce confident and adaptable females (Lady Sif, Hope Van Dyne, Okoye, Frigga) but a lack of real personal relations always seemed odd to me.


Here however, the Russos put relationships at the forefront. It’s what connects these characters and what makes us connect to them. Vision (Paul Bettany) and Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen) get the bulk of these developments whilst Quill (Chris Pratt) and Gamora additionally are involved in some truly touching scenes. Previous hints between Bruce Banner and Natasha Romanoff was one of the best parts of the disappointing Age of Ultron but unfortunately, like their Hulk and Black Widow alter-egos, they sadly don’t get the full treatment here in Infinity War.


And it’s not just romance. Friendship, support, family are all strong themes and Tony Stark’s surrogate father figure to Peter Parker’s Spider-Man led to one of the most emotional moments of the entire film. And despite being guilty of a ‘Rogue One’ with some trailer shots blatantly absent from the movie, the film’s action sequences are as large as you expect and aside from some ropey alien hordes, sit more comfortable in real locations than either Ragnarok or Black Panther.


A film in which no one feels safe and a few fan-pleasing cameos from films past, Infinity War is as huge as anyone could have asked for. Personally I don’t feel it hit the heights of that initial buzz from Iron Man – heck, I was 28 when that came out – or the first team-up of The Avengers. Additionally it didn’t feel like the genre game-changers that were the highly praised Winter Soldier or James Gunn's Guardians of the Galaxy. But, and it’s a huge but, this is explosive summer blockbuster cinema of the highest order without question.


A greatest hits album in all senses of the word, Infinity War is a compilation of scenes containing previously established crowd-pleasers with a high degree of already agreed notability. However, like those albums it is common to include remixes of the popular tropes and the Russos add enough new material, depth and high stakes to lay down the gauntlet to other filmmakers resulting in this absolute gem of a movie.


8/10


Midlands Movies Mike



By midlandsmovies, Apr 13 2018 10:10PM



Black Panther (2018) Dir. Ryan Coogler


Now surpassing Titanic as the third highest-grossing film at the American box office ever, Marvel’s Black Panther has been a cultural and audience phenomenon. It has taught the industry a crucial lesson that superhero films can tackle complicated issues of race, representation and politics and still make huge profits.


The story concerns itself with the continuing tale of Chadwick Boseman’s T'Challa (Black Panther) who inherited the mantle of King of Wakanda after his father died in an attack seen in Marvel’s Civil War. Back in his homeland, Wakanda is an African country mixing traditional imagery of the continent with the possession of futuristic technology, but one they have hidden from the rest of the world. This issue that groups should get involved in the wider community is a running theme that Coogler tackles and permeates throughout. In Wakanda, a number of tribes fight for the right to be King but in America we find Michael B. Jordan’s Killmonger making plans to take the crown himself.


Amongst this simple revenge plot, the film tackles family and arms dealing along with female empowerment. Letitia Wright plays Shuri, T’Challa’s sister and designer of Wakandan technology in a great role that echoes Q from the James Bond films. In addition, we have Star Wars’ Lupita Nyong'o as Nakia whilst Danai Gurira as Okoye is the highlight for me by giving a fantastic powerful performance as the head of the female fight-force that protects the Royal family.


So with an amazing cast, important social issues and the Marvel name behind it, the film is a runaway success, right? Well (takes deep breath), not quite.


Sacrilege I hear you say. But as much as I admired Black Panther’s positive messages the film never grasped me with so-so set pieces and on a technical level it reminded me far too much of Avatar in its heavily reliance on CGI. Never once did I feel I was outside the USA – heck not even outside a green screen room – and for a film set in Africa it would have been great to see the production actually film in the beautiful continent.


As with my concerns about Thor Ragnarok, I ask if the MCU is running out of steam – especially with its lazy CGI and technical elements. I was probably the only one but the film, at times, committed the worse crime of all. I found it drifting into dullness.


Coogler’s previous film Creed (2016) also with Michael B. Jordan was one of my top films of that year along with historical sports drama Race. In addition, Jordan Peele’s Get Out also tackled modern race relations and made our 2017 top 20. But Black Panther’s excellent message was lost in some dull council meetings (echoes of Phantom Menace) and the aforementioned poor CGI.


I feel for actors nowadays when they are announced as the next superhero. Previously, the feeling of putting on the suit during casting must have felt amazing but the character is so poorly rendered in CGI that Boseman’s excellent fighting stunts (seen in brilliant and brutal waterfall fights) are completely absent when the suit goes on. Bouncing around with no realism or weight, the computer generated models meant I couldn’t feel that we were actually “there” which was a flaw. I felt myself sighing as the rubber renderings bounced around like a cartoon.


So where does that leave Black Panther? Marvel have finally returned to the director-driven films they begun with. Branagh brought his experience of Shakespearean family feuds, also seen in Black Panther, whilst Joe Johnston’s Captain America used his previous 1940s comic book work on The Rocketeer. And Coogler does the same here – bringing his own class, a soundtrack which excels and the best group cast of 2018 to deliver his message.


Covering a whole range of ideas on race relations, positive black and female role models and questions about appropriation and inclusion, the director’s stamp is all over Black Panther’s central themes. I just wished it was done with some more entertainment and less CGI as, for me, much is swamped by a lack of believability in its standard revenge story.


But, let’s be fair here, whilst I saw it more as “Bland” Panther, the box office has proven any reservations I have about the film were not felt by the wide majority of the audience. And Black Panther’s position as an important film, and rightly so, is cemented in this colourful trip to Wakanda.


6.5/10


Midlands Movies Mike



By midlandsmovies, Jul 14 2017 07:46AM



Wonder Woman (2017) Dir. Patty Jenkins

Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) Dir. Jon Watts


Huge superhero franchises are just a thing now. They can be as exciting as a rollercoaster. Or like bad breath, an immediate turn-off. However, in many cases, they sit comfortably like a nice warm cuppa in the summer blockbuster season. Neither a die-hard Marvel or DC fan – like most I just simply enjoy a good film – the two behemoths of the comic (now film) world have released key movies in their complicated production schedule.


After the solid Man of Steel, the abysmal Batman Vs Superman and the misstep of Suicide Squad, DC really needed a hit in order to regain some of the credibility lost from those less-than-satisfying tent-poles. So they’ve taken a chance (which should be hugely applauded) and given Gal Godot the long overdue central role of the infamous female superhero. After 14 films, Marvel STILL haven’t given any woman in their universe a film. Although Brie Larson as Captain Marvel is due soon, Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) is notably absent from Marvel’s solo film roster.


In short, the narrative shows Wonder Woman (Diana Price) jumping from Themyscira, the island home of an Amazon race of warrior women, to 1918 Europe during the height of the Great War. On her way she saves Chris Pine’s soldier Steve Trevor on her journey to destroy Ares, the god of war, who she believes is the cause of the conflict.


A fresh fish-out-of-water story, the film contains so much of what was missing from DC films so far – humanity, sensitivity, comedy and some characters with motivations you can get behind. Going for simplicity hugely helps the story and director Jenkins (her first film since Monster 14 years ago!) should be massively applauded for ditching the dourness and injecting some overdue fun. At the half way point, as ludicrous as Wonder Woman wearing her full costume in No Man’s Land is, the film already has its tone clearly defined and the audience swept along in its entertainment.


If there was a fault it would be two – albeit small. Firstly, the film suffers from the fact Marvel’s Captain America did the ‘hero in war’ film already so similarities are sadly inevitable. The second is the final battle which has flames (orange) and energy beams (teale) in the obligatory let’s smash everything up mess. Scarily reminiscent of BvS, my eyes rolled at the familiar imagery, which is confusingly edited, and contains the usual over-use of CGI where nothing has much weight. However, more on this later.


Moving on, yet still speaking of the familiar, Marvel has released its new version of the infamous web-slinger. One of the hottest properties out there – maybe only second to Batman and Superman as the most famous superhero (?) – they have done a deal with franchise-owning Sony to finally add Peter Parker to the ever-expanding MCU. His brief appearance in Civil War was a great introduction but with 3 cinematic iterations of the character in just 10 years, can something fresh be brought to the screen?


Well, in the majority, it’s a massive yes! Tom Holland is a hugely likeable Peter Parker and Marvel wisely ditches an origin story (the fact he was bitten by a spider is briefly mentioned once) and focuses on the teenager’s school problems alongside his goals to become an Avenger. Under the tutelage of Tony Stark he’s given the responsibility of a super suit which he struggles to contain in his eagerness to progress. Peter’s ambition jumps from defending the neighbourhood to attempting to stop Michael Keaton’s ‘Vulture’, who is selling alien weaponary he has stolen from previous Avengers’ encounters.


Tying nicely into the MCU but setting out its own individual story, Homecoming (surprisingly) brings enough to the plate to set it aside from the Garfield and Maguire versions. The teen angst is superbly handled, an action sequence atop the Washington Monument was phenomenal (go see this in 3-D and really feel the vertigo) and its jokes come so thick and fast the film veers from superhero action flick to outright pure comedy.


Keaton, who I’ve loved since Batman ’89 (my personal favourite superhero film) is so watchable here he’s already jumped to a close second, behind just Loki, as one of the best MCU villains to date – an area Marvel has been under-achieving at best.


Strangely, its biggest flaw is almost the same as Wonder Woman’s. A final battle sees the Vulture – with flames in the background (orange) – take on Spidey using his damaged mechanical wings (both teale) and here we are again. In a film taking lots of chances, it was a sequence that could have done with a shot of more unique web-slinging action and originality.


That aside, Spider-Man’s first full film in the Marvel world was certainly a surprising success. Was it better than Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 2? Personally, I think not. Raimi’s unique directorial style and more interesting villain still holds firm but Marvel went VERY close to reassessing its pole position.


Both films then prove to be hugely satisfying and have course-corrected their respective franchises as needed. Both are surprising in all the best ways – Wonder Woman’s feminine focus and more subtle story shows DC can get audiences emotionally involved and Spider-Man proves that Marvel can bring something new and fresh to an over-exposed character. Super!


7.5/10 Wonder Woman


8/10 Spider-Man: Homecoming


Midlands Movies Mike

By midlandsmovies, Jun 6 2017 04:26PM


Local filmmaker ready to take you to another world


With the release of Marvel’s Spider-Man: Homecoming in the Summer of 2017, interest in the web-slinging superhero is at an all-time high. After a deal that saw Spidey enter the MCU from a property owned by Sony, fans are anticipating a great first adventure during the blockbuster season.


However, the biggest fan might just be right here in the Midlands as Leicester filmmaker Joey Lever is set to launch his own fan-film based around the infamous New Yorker. Now we’re “tingling” with excitement, we swing by to find out more about the ambitious production.


In early 2017, Joey Lever won a Midlands Movies Award for his sound mixing work on his film Paper Plane which began a successful start to a year that looks set to explode for the local filmmaker.


His new superhero fan film is Spider-Man: Another World and it is in fact part of a larger shared universe he has created with fellow fans. Taking an idea from Marvel themselves, Lever has named it "The strand of web, web series" which includes 3 films and one short.


DiGitiLhEaRt & PavillionArts are the studios who have invested in his vision and Joey’s new project has also seen him working with many of the region’s most talented creatives, including Gatling Gun Productions who also hail from Leicestershire.


With the trailer just launched in June (see YouTube video above) Joey Lever says “We are so excited to hear what [fans] think about it as this been such an amazing experience to step back into the shoes of Peter Parker. This time trying to make a fan film that is different and we are so proud of the outcome”.


Also supporting the production is comic book artist Marc Ducrow who has designed the film’s poster.



Updating via the movie's Facebook page, Joey goes on to add, “As a child I was always fascinated by the idea to tell stories in different ways. I spent many years growing up drawing, acting out little sequences I thought up before bedtime. This blossomed into my love of film making. Every film you see of mine will be made with my heart and soul”.

Based in Leicester, Joey is a self-taught freelance filmmaker & cinematographer and has been lucky enough to work internationally on projects in the USA, South America, Australia and Germany


As well as writing and directing Lever himself stars in the action-drama alongside local talent Jak Lionel Beasley, Lauren Baxter, Gill Broderick, Wade James Keeling and Carley Lightfoot.


We'll be keeping a close eye on the film's development as it comes to launch and follow the movie's updates on the official pages below.

https://www.facebook.com/SpiderManLC


http://www.joeylever.com

By midlandsmovies, May 8 2017 09:04AM



Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) Dir. James Gunn


After the huge success of the first film, writer-director James Gunn returns to the vibrant day-glow world of Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) and his eclectic gang for this sequel in the never-ending Marvel franchise.


One of its positives is perhaps its lack of connection to the shared Marvel cinematic universe allowing for (aside from few post-credit scenes) a focus on its own story rather than setting up future characters and films with a set of unfulfilling cliff-hangers.


Here the superhero film focuses on the Guardians crew who are now mercenaries for hire of sorts and after defeating a large squid in a superb one-take musical opening, meet with a golden race called the Sovereign. Their reward for their job is Gamora’s sister Nebula (Zoe Saldana and Karen Gillan respectively) but they are soon on the run after Rocket Racoon (voiced brilliantly still by Bradley Cooper) steals valuable batteries from them.


After being chased, the group split with Peter, Gamora and Drax ending up on a sentient planet created by Peter’s God-like father Ego (Kurt Russell) whilst Rocket and Vin Diesel’s (baby) Groot cross paths with Michael Rooker’s superb Yondu who is in trouble with his own mutinous clan.


GOTG Vol. 2 is a fresh, superb sequel that delves deeper into these characters established in the original and each distinct personality has their own unique narrative arc. Gunn has done a great job with a multi-character script with a few pop-culture references (TV’s Knightrider is brilliantly given a nod) which do not muddy the deeper themes. Gunn uses serious drama, stories of revenge and love and a father-son dynamic to create conflict in a lesson to all budding scriptwriters. Yet, none of it feels like a surface gesture.


Drax’s “literal” laughter develops into more understanding of his bluntness whilst fun jokes, such as the ones at the expense of the strangely named Taserface, sit perfectly with parental quarrels and inter-team tensions.


The film never once felt slow or dragged out and is edited to within an inch of its life letting the audience know exactly where everyone is and what their motivations are. This is without losing the crucial essence of the characters. Rogue One this isn’t and thank goodness for that.


Given the film’s sensitive subject matter to me after my own recent loss of a parent, the ideas and excellent delivery of them by Gunn hit an emotional core that may be beyond the casual viewer. However, that’s not to say others will not find an emotional resonance with the superbly played out poignancy of the film’s conclusion – where I admit a tear of two was shed.


Dave Bautista as Drax rounds out the first-rate acting on show and I would go as far to say that the film could be even better than the first. Like Raimi’s Spider-Man 2, the film jumps straight into the drama without the need for the “origin story” and delves deeper into each character and their universe akin to classic sci-fi follow up Empire Strikes Back.


With enough new elements added, as well as the obligatory 70s soundtrack which is incorporated well into the story, GOTG Vol. 2 is an exceptional feat. The film could be the best-looking Marvel film to date with its eye-popping colour palette and with outstanding costumes, make-up and special effects scenes will satisfy the action fans. However, for me it showed that if you care about your leads then these are hugely heightened. Yet the film’s best asset is Gunn himself who delivers the whole package needed in a summer blockbuster and it is he who is the Guardian of his own gorgeous galaxy.


9/10


Midlands Movies Mike

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