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By midlandsmovies, Jan 24 2019 11:30AM



Filmmakers homage to Saturday Night and Sunday Morning for 60th Anniversary


Local filmmakers Them Pesky Kids and director Luke Radford are releasing a homage to Alan Sillitoe’s "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" to celebrate the original film’s approaching 60th anniversary at Rough Trade on the 1st of February.


On February 1st of January, Nottingham Director Luke Radford and Them Pesky Kids are hosting a launch night at Rough Trade Nottingham to mark the online release of their homage to Alan Sillitoe’s Saturday Night and Sunday Morning.


Aptly titled, “I’ll be Here After the Factory is Gone” tells a modern day reimagining of Arthur Seaton’s story expressing just how relevant the book and film still is today 60 years later.


Having already screened at Nottingham Contemporary in July, and Broadway Cinema in September as part of their Working Class Heroes season preceding the original film, the Rough Trade screening will mark the third and final public screening of the film before releasing its online release.


With free entry and featuring musical performances from The Ruffs and DJs throughout the night, the event will be taking donations to raise money for the St Anns Advice Centre and Food Bank, a charity dedicated to helping inhabitants in some of the most in need areas of Nottingham.


A modern day homage to Alan Sillitoe’s “Saturday Night and Sunday Morning”. Arthur is a young man stuck in the 9 to 5 office grind, finding his salvation in booze, parties, and women; until a new love brings clarity to his world. Directed by Luke Radford, Starring Aaron Lodge, Kelly Jaggers, and Esmeé Matthews. Set to music of Nottingham band The Ruffs. You can read our full Midlands Movies review by clicking this link.



Director Luke Radford adds, "I saw Saturday Night and Sunday Morning a few years ago and immediately read the book it's based on. It’s over 60 years since it was first released and the environment, themes and characters still resonate".


"I took themes and key elements of the original narrative and placed them in a contemporary setting with Arthur Seaton now working in telesales rather than the Raleigh factory.".


The film will be released online via Them Pesky Kids’ Vimeo and social media pages on the 1st of February at 7.30pm. Them Pesky Kids is a production company based in Nottingham who produce films and provide video content and solutions to a range of companies, www.thempeskykids.co.uk


Luke Radford recently had the limited theatrical release of his debut feature film Outlawed, which is also currently available in the USA on DVD/VOD. The UK release is set for mid 2019. Luke also teaches Film Production at Confetti ICT as he works towards his next project.



By midlandsmovies, Sep 7 2018 03:41PM



Midlands Review - I'll Be Here After the Factory Is Gone


Directed by Luke Radford


Them Pesky Kids


This new film is the latest short from filmmaker Luke Radford which features a soundtrack from Nottingham band The Ruffs but contains far more narrative than you would expect from your average local music video.


The inspiration behind the short is Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, the 1960 British drama film directed by Karel Reisz. That itself is an adaptation of the 1958 novel of the same name by Alan Sillitoe, who also wrote the movie’s screenplay.


And like the book and the film, Radford has featured a young man drinking and partying whilst maintaining affairs and relationships that cause him more than his fair share of trouble.


We open with a young man (Aaron Lodge as Arthur Seaton) who types away at a keyboard in an office that could be any in Britain. However, Radford scores this sequence with the hard clanking of machinery which contradicts the formal office location we see on screen but is a fantastic nod to the Raleigh factory in Nottingham which provided this setting in the 1960 film.


As spreadsheets are discussed, coffee is drunk and staff chat on mobile phones, we are quickly shown the demoralising nature of a desk job that drains your soul. Much like in Fight Club (1999) or Wanted (2008) we get a young male protagonist sick of this grind and itching for the thrills of real life.


Radford speedily edits to upbeat music once Arthur leaves work and the quick cuts capture the excitement of a weekend. As the evening goes on, the rock n roll song is the perfect soundtrack for a night on the beers where pool is played and laughs are had. The inherent machismo is clear to see as Arthur heads to a club and the excellent neon and strobe lighting shows fantastic cinematography skill.


After chatting to a woman, we are then shown the couple waiting for that elusive post-clubbing kebab before cutting to the next morning where she wakes up to find him getting ready to leave. And his problems begin as the lady (Kelly Jaggers as Ruby) has a picture of her family next to the bed. This being a music video, there is no dialogue so Radford expertly creates meaning and plot through small details like this photograph. As Arthur consumes a traditional British breakfast, he returns home to his mum as Ruby’s husband returns to her.


The next sequence shows Arthur again on the town and this time takes a shine to another lady – slightly more his own age – and as the beers flow we see him cosy up to Anne (played by Esmee Matthews) back in another nightclub.



The film pauses briefly here and as the book itself is in two parts (the Saturday night and Sunday morning obviously) this short also establishes its own break as a secondary – more melancholic song – begins.


Arthur spends time with this new girl at an arcade and at a bowling alley (echoes of the amusement ride from the original film here too) but Ruby and her family are also here. The film then pulls no punches as Arthur enters a city underpass and a violent retribution is enacted by her husband and his friends.


There are consequences to his hedonism after all but does he deserve this? Well, the film doesn’t answer this question and like the book it’s inspired by, we see that as time passes his wounds slowly heal yet one final encounter with Ruby suggests he still has mixed feelings of settling down.


Radford’s film is a great adaptation of a classic British kitchen-sink drama and although he brings the story into the 21st century he does not let the core messages and themes get overshadowed by his update. With no dialogue the actors do well to convey their characters and Radford allows the images to direct the audience to the important plot developments. With love, violence, relationships and more all covered in its short 8-minute run time, Radford has admirably condensed a large cinematic tale into a succinct adaptation without losing any of its power.


Mike Sales


I’ll Be Here After the Factory Is Gone is screening before the original film on the 23rd September 2018 at 1pm at the Broadway Cinema in Nottingham


More details here: http://www.broadway.org.uk/events/film-saturday-night-and-sunday-morning1




By midlandsmovies, Aug 29 2018 06:55PM



Outlawed (2018)


Directed by Adam Collins & Luke Radford


Outlaw Productions


“Who do you think you are? Bruce Willis?”


So says one cop in new Nottingham film Outlawed. And by all accounts, co-director, co-writer and main star of the film Adam Collins – also a former Royal Marine Commando – may just be exactly that in his new flick which does a damn good imitation of Die Hard and similar retro actioners.


We open on Nottingham in 1996 as we hover over the city at night before unhinged criminal Harry Archibald (Ian Hitchens) executes the city’s Mayor in an alley in a ruthless power move. But the whole incident is witnessed which sets in motion the story of Outlawed.


A local film of some flair, we are then whisked away to Afghanistan – via a CGI plane – and the first thing to note is the amazing production values of what could have been a homemade affair.


As the titles roll we get a parachute drop, a shoot-out and an impressive award ceremony. Whatever little money the filmmakers have is all up on screen and whilst the accents keep it firmly a Midlands film, the movie has far more Hollywood sheen than I was expecting.


This is partly the result of the fantastic professional look from the five cinematographers. The shadows, the lighting, the silhouettes and even the daytime shooting from the combined efforts of Robert Beck, Troy Edige, Will Price, Nico Turner and Louis Vella all make it incredibly visually interesting. They film Nottingham landmarks such as Trent Bridge, Nottingham City War Memorial and Nottingham Council House with great skill from the start.


Back to the story, we get to find out that commando Jake O’Neill returns from war to be offered a deal with Archibald now in his new position of power. After refusing he struggles to adjust to normal life and when he finds his girlfriend cheating on him, his life begins to spiral out of control.


However, when a girl from his past (Jessica Norris as Jade Roberts) contacts him to investigate her father’s death, he agrees but soon after a failed rescue mission in which a young boy loses his life, Jake completely self-destructs in orgies of drink and drugs. The film’s acting is solid but there are times when clichéd dialogue slips in a bit too often (“I’m not cut out to play happy families”, “welcome to the party” and “there’s no school like the old school”). These are quirky nods to other action films but seemed a bit too familiar in their repetition.


However, it’s the action – also influenced by 80s and 90s classics – that is most impressive here. A deal-gone-wrong at a car yard that ends in a violent shootout with machine guns and explosions and is impressively handled. And as the narrative steamrolls ahead – albeit a bit messily – there’s frankly no time to get bored at all.


A sequence of commandos tackling an armed group of hostage-takers filmed in an abandoned factory has echoes of Robocop and slews of bloodied guts hark back to Verhoeven’s other brutal classic Total Recall. A nice Wilhelm scream is a sly nod to old Hollywood stunt-work yet leads us to the amazing sound mixing. Outlawed has expertly handled the difficult balancing act of complex explosions and gun shots alongside the dialogue and is a joy to the ears as well as the eyes!


From a snow-covered graveyard to an impressive church, the sheer variety of visuals throughout is spectacular for this level of filmmaking. Only an operation room betrays the film’s production values. Yet, as we pick up Jake in his most dire of times, his dismissal means he heads to a casino to gamble. And with his tuxedo and liquor, Adam Collins could easily be considered for the next James Bond. Some racy sex scenes are sprinkled throughout and Collins’ natural charm on screen works well with the confidence shown behind the camera where he has utilised different influences from a genre he’s clearly passionate about.


And whilst the script could do with some polish, the film’s ending is a spectacular revenge action sequence as Jake rescues his loved one from the clutches of the villain. Getting to this point we have seen all the right pieces for a Hollywood actioner – sex, style, seedy goings on as well as guns, bullets and explosions. However, this breath-taking finale will satisfy and then some. The full rampant final sequence includes motorcycle stunts, snipers, fist fights, people on fire as well as grenades and a rocket launcher (!)


Filmmakers who feel the leap from the local to Hollywood is too huge a barrier should study Outlawed. With plenty of inventive filming techniques, the film is the kind of movie that can see filmmakers move from the independent scene to larger studio-helmed projects.


One of the hardest things for me here is to review the film as being at the high end of the low budget local film community OR the low end of the high budget film community. It straddles both which is actually a huge compliment. Fans of Olympus Has Fallen will enjoy this, but the film demonstrates how local filmmakers are no longer showing them to “just their mates” but creating movies vying for position on your shelf or in your Netflix playlist.


Certainly not without some flaws – most of which come from a handful of over-used genre clichés – Outlawed should be seen as a high benchmark for regional filmmakers looking to create feature films that can compete in the big leagues. Tackling a genre – action – that requires a high degree of skill and dexterity on technical aspects like stunts, special effects and fight choreography is also no easy task. The fact that Outlawed delivers plenty of all of these in spades is testament to the startling cinematic talents of all the incredible cast and crew. And action fans will love the high-octane thrills and shattering action all the way through.


Mike Sales


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