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By midlandsmovies, Apr 21 2018 08:52AM



An Officer and a Gentleman at Curve Leicester


An Officer and a Gentleman starring Richard Gere and Debra Winger was a huge critical and commercial success when released in 1982 grossing $130 million and winning an Oscar for Louis Gossett Jr. for Best Supporting Actor.


This new Curve production from Nikolai Foster takes the same premise but infuses it with an 80s-flavoured soundtrack of well-known hits from the decade. Telling the story of Zack Mayo and his Navy training in Florida, the protagonist falls in love with local girl Paula whilst conflicting with a tough Sergeant during his classes.


With successes in theatre productions of big movie hits (see our reviews of Sunset Blvd. and Grease), Foster doubles down on the music to carry this production and it mostly works. Mostly.


The film opens with an adaptation of In the Army Now (most famously recorded in the UK by soft-rock icons Status Quo) but here changed to “navy” and we see the cast work well together like combat ready marines themselves.


The soft-rock continues as the story develops as we are introduced to Zack (Jonny Fines) who signs up to the Navy and forms a friendship with Sid (Ian McIntosh). Quickly they get to know girls off the barracks Paula (Emma Williams) and Lynette (Jessica Daley). The ladies’ blue collar toughness shines through as they faithfully deliver renditions of It’s A Man’s Man’s Man’s World and the perennial retro classic Girls Just Wanna Have Fun. Their broad interpretations delivered the songs with gusto but sadly character development and drama was unfortunately side-lined for the high-energy tunes.


More fleshed out was Keisha Atwell’s Casey Seegar who channels her beautiful voice with a rough and ready performance as the sole female in the outfit. Her strong vocals even came through in the group performances as well as her solo stints.


As a member of a rock band myself, one niggle was the “power” of the cover songs themselves. Although this changed for the second act – I think the soundman found the bass, kick drum and guitar volume faders and cranked them up – part one lacked the explosiveness of the songs themselves – making them a bit bland.


The vocals were top notch throughout but the heavy Marshall-stack guitar solos, the uber-reverb and over-produced drums were nowhere to be seen. The excessive 80s were known for their “hugeness” (see the end of Foreigner’s I Want to Know What Love is) but this was sadly missing.


That said, Act 2 began with a bang and the increased production levels (and volume) of the bass on Bon Jovi’s Livin’ on a Prayer was a welcomed wake-up call after the interval. Versions of Kids in America, St. Elmo’s Fire and Toy Soldiers all hit the mark whilst Madonna’s Material Girl (again, another song of excess that was expressed in its overblown music video) was a bit lacklustre.


My nit-picking of the music covers shouldn’t take away from some huge successes though. The choreography by Kate Prince is fantastic. The best being a seated sequence where the cadets mime out hand moves in front of imaginary computers. Their hard ‘logical’ movements measuring out straight lines with their arms are a mix of intensity and concentration. But soon their chaotic actions harmonize in an amazing physical representation of the de-humanizing effect on the individual in the armed forces. Amazing!


Also, despite the film’s infamous tension between the stars of the film, there is strong on-stage chemistry between Fines and Williams as well as the rest of the cast. One standout performance was Ian McIntosh’s tragic Sid and his slowed version of Hall & Oates’ Family Man was the highlight of the night, coming as it did with great neon-lit stage production of silhouettes and smoke.


In conclusion, Leicester’s Curve delivers another welcome film adaptation that gives a well-known romance a new twist with the inclusion of pop hits. Audiences will witness all hard work all the cast have put in during their rehearsals (maybe they had their own drill instructor) which means ‘Officer’ will lift your spirits up with its mix of famous tracks and a fun, if slightly workman-like, delivery.


Midlands Movies Mike


Grab tickets from the Box Office on 0116 242 3595

By midlandsmovies, Apr 17 2018 09:24PM



Shootfighters

Directed by Richard Butterworth

Fifty-Nine Films


Shootfighters is a 30min documentary by Richard Butterworth that showcases the Leicester Shootfighters Mixed Martial Arts School circa 2011.


The school trains young men in the art of MMA, which to the uninitiated (i.e. me) looks like two people in a cage smacking the hell out of each other. Through the course of the documentary, it's made clear that there's much much more to the sport than this image.


As someone who has never practised a martial art and has little interest in sport (I know, I know), I wasn't at all sure how to approach this review before watching the film. I'm a big believer in opening your mind and letting in new experiences, though, so I thought it would be interesting to watch - and it certainly is!


Right away, I learned that there are over 50+ MMA clubs in Leicester alone, and that the sport originally had very few rules before it evolved into the form it enjoys today, as exemplified by the UFC. Then we get into the meat of the documentary.




We're introduced to Aiden Hayes (though I admit I was a little confused as the first person we see is actually his brother Andre), a 20 year old fighter who's determined to be the best mixed martial artist.


The documentary touches briefly on his troubled past as his father describes Aidan's struggles in school and how joining Shootfighters gave him focus and purpose. We're told how angry and aggressive he was before discovering the sport, and how he was able to channel this into his training. There's a real sense of the competition that he and his brother feel, the need to compete and dominate and be the best.


It's not easy. MMA is a remarkably technical sport, a melding of several disciplines and styles, and it takes a huge commitment. As one of the doc's talking heads puts it: “these guys are athletes, they're not thugs, not anyone can do this.” I think it may be easy to forget this when caught up in the showmanship of events like UFC matches. These are serious athletes pushing themselves with series training regimes.


Butterworth has a good eye for dynamic shots, mixing it up so that it never feels static no matter how many talking heads we cut to. I did find myself wishing this was a feature length documentary as I would have loved to follow Aiden's journey more closely, showing a more in-depth look at a typical training day perhaps, or seeing him interacting with his brother and exhibiting the competitive relationship we're told about. On the whole, it feels almost like more time is spent on learning about the nature and the psychology of MMA than about Aiden himself, though in fact about equal weight is given to both.


If you're interested in MMA and the mindset of someone who practices it, this documentary would be a good place to start to give you a sense of how important the sport is to the fighters. It's clear that the athletes are as passionate about this as any Olympic athlete is about their own sport. I think this documentary has chipped away at some level of snobbery I didn't even know I had, which is as good a reason as any to check it out!


Some light googling reveals very little information about Aidan Hayes' career after this was filmed. Hopefully he recovered from his injury; there is a video on YouTube that suggests he was fighting as recently as 2014 if the upload date is anything to go by. Leicester Shootfighters is of course still going strong.


I wish you luck, Aidan, I hope you're out there knocking 'em dead. But not literally, because I'm pretty sure that's illegal!


Sam Kurd


Twitter @Splend


By midlandsmovies, Apr 10 2018 05:23PM



Midlands Movies Interview - Going Behind the Lens with Jordan Dean


Local filmmaker Jordan Dean came to Leicester’s De Montfort University from Hull at the age of 22 and grew up like so many did with Spielberg and Star Wars as his first foray into film. We speak to this exciting new local filmmaker about his influences, film music and the uncomfortableness of watching audition tapes.


Midlands Movies: Hi Jordan. Glad you could join today. You mention you got into film via Spielberg?

Jordan Dean: Yes I did, but as a kid I was always asking how they managed to create these fantastical worlds!


MM: And getting older how did you end up in your current position?

JD: Well my love for film as a youngster developed into working for Bizarre Culture where I was their film and media editor. I wrote articles and reviews before studying film at DMU in Leicester. It was a very academic weighted degree but at a very highly regarded film university.


MM: And what did you learn during those years?

JD: Well, I made some terrible and awful stuff in my first year [laughs]. But by my third year I had learnt a lot so chose to make a film rather than do a written dissertation. By doing that I tried to prove to myself I could handle a larger production. I actually had 27 cast and crew for a 7-minute short. This included costume designers, extras, fashion models and the like. It really helped me learn different skills, got me a first in my degree and then played at 5 festivals winning a cinematography award at one of them. That was when I thought - I can do this!


MM: I went to the same University funnily enough from 1998-2001 and we only had video in year 1! It moved very quickly to digital.

JD: Ha ha. I would love to shoot on film but producers say think about the money!


MM: So where are you now in your career?

JD: Well now I am undertaking an MA in Film Production with DMU and Pinewood Studios which is exciting. I get to work every week with Terry Bamber (first assistant director on films such as Gulliver’s Travels and World War Z), Chris Kenny and Iain Smith, producer of Mad Max: Fury Road. It’s a real high calibre of people to learn from.


MM: Sounds very rewarding. What projects have you made?

JD: I worked on Not Alone which was actually a film to test equipment but has recently won a short film award at the Direct Short Online Film Festival. In addition I’ve been working with Rhys Davies on his upcoming feature Acid Daemons (click here for info on that film).



MM: You also made Behind the Lens which was nominated for a Midlands Movies Award in 2018 for best score for Peter Flint (click here). What were your influences for that film?

JD: Both of us were influenced by Drive and Neon Demon composer Cliff Martinez. I also love John Carpenter and got great feedback from Terry (Bamber) that Not Alone was Carpenter-esque which was fantastic to hear.


MM: It’s great to have recognition from someone who has been in the industry for a long time. I have seen in the Midlands that those connections and recommendations can really help (and inspire) local independent filmmakers move forward in their work.

JD: Yes and also give you the feeling that you do know what you’re doing. I’m not the best at networking and its great to be at Pinewood to meet people but also at the Midlands Movies film awards where I met likeminded filmmakers from the region.


MM: With local filmmakers like Gareth Edwards, who jumped from editing Monsters in his home to Godzilla and then to Star Wars, is he an example of how low budget can spiral to the big time no matter how unlikely? Does that help motivate you?

JD: It’s really inspiring to see those journeys, of course. I also love sci-fi. E.T. is one of my all -time favourite films. I’d love to make a film in that genre but I feel I would need the resources to do justice to the ideas I would want to convey. My main focus right now is horror. I’m obsessed with scary films since seeing The Texas Chainsaw Massacre when I was younger.


MM: I definitely noticed a Neon Demon influence in Behind the Lens

JD: My biggest influence right now actually is Nicholas Winding Refn. I know he’s not for everyone but I love his films. Over the last few years I’ve also enjoyed a variety of horrors such as The Babadook and It Follows. I’m not a fan of the current jump-scare style movies though.




MM: I found the recent version of IT a surprise success for Hollywood horror but its musical stings were warnings which gave away the approaching scares. Do you like foreign horrors though?

JD: I think you feel more vulnerable watching a foreign horror giving the investment you have to make. I am a huge fan of Asian extreme horror and my next film is heavily influenced by Park Chan-Wook’s The Handmaiden.


MM: Are there any other genres you would like to dip your toe into?

JD: I don’t want to be a genre filmmaker as such. As a fan of Refn, if you showed Neon Demon to someone they may not consider it a horror. I would like to do similar and mix genres up but I was also exhausted by the end of The Witch as it built up tension without giving the audience a release. I wouldn’t mind trying a straight-up drama and tell a simpler story as well.


MM: Where do you get your ideas from?

JD: Behind the Lens is very much influenced by the photographer character from the Neon Demon and realised I had alos met those type of creepy, really intense characters.

MM: Voyeuristic?

JD: Very much so. I can get uncomfortable myself looking at audition tapes that I get sent given the nature of it.


MM: And where next for you?

JD: The next film is The Nail That Sticks Out whose title is taken from a Japanese proverb. It’s the first film I’m directing that I haven’t written. Rebecca Whelan has written a great script and I was instantly attracted to it as it has a tone and themes I can relate to myself.


MM: And what’s the story of the film without giving too much away?

JD: It’s about a Japanese artist living in England and her girlfriend is a failing English actress. It’s about culture clashes and how far different people are willing to go to produce their art. The two characters go in very different directions.


MM: And how far into production are you?

JD: We're making the crowdfunding promo this week and it’s the most ambitious project I’ve ever been involved in. We’re shooting at the end of July in the Midlands at Scene Studios in Nottingham and location shooting at DMU as well. It also has an all Midlands based crew and we're looking to raise an £8000 budget which feels ominous but we’re hoping for success once we launch.


MM: And what’s changed for you on all of these projects?

JD: It’s a scary thing to undertake these different films. Especially when you can’t always pay people when you are starting out and there are very difficult thing to manage on small productions. Now we’ve got a group of people involved – including a producer – there’s a move away from checking the sound and lighting etc yourself. There’s people you can trust in all the roles within the crew. And Peter Flint will be again working with me on the score so we’re discussing that right now.


MM: That must be a relief?

JD: To an extent. My first real production (Acid Daemons) I was working with others and I took the advice that if I had a full understanding of how film works – not just your own role – then you understand the departments and their processes. By having a little bit of knowledge about each department you can respect their craft.


MM: Thanks Jordan. Any final thoughts or help for other local filmmakers?

JD: Don’t be scared of feedback. I have a weird thing as I think I encourage criticism as it’s the only way you learn. Friends and parents will go “it’s great” but you can’t ride that for long otherwise you won’t get anywhere.


Follow Jordan Dean for updates on all his projects on his Twitter feed here: https://twitter.com/Jordandeanfilm






By midlandsmovies, Mar 16 2018 11:00AM

Quite simply, here is our ongoing and updated list of Film Festivals in the Midlands (2018 edition):


• THE SHORT CINEMA http://www.theshortcinema.co.uk info@theshortcinema.co.uk Phoenix, Leicester - August 20 – 25, 2018


• NOTTINGHAM MICRO FILM FESTIVAL Twitter @FilmNottingham http://www.nimfestival.com/ 8-10 March 2018


• INDIE-LINCS - March 15-18 2018 Based at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, and run in partnership with The School of Film and Media at the University of Lincoln http://www.indie-lincs.com


• BRINDLEY PLACE OUTDOOR FEST - http://www.brindleyplace.com/event/brindleyplace-film-festival-2018/ July 16 -22 2018


• LEICESTER DOCFILM FEST https://twitter.com/docfilmfestival Contact John Coster November 2018


• BORDERLINES FEST http://www.borderlinesfilmfestival.co.uk UK's largest rural film festival. Herefordshire/Shropshire - 23rd February - 11th March 2018


• BIRMINGHAM FILM FEST - November 22 – 25 2018 https://filmfreeway.com/festival/Birminghamfilmfestival


• BIFF FEST (Black International Film Fest) https://www.biffestival.co.uk 2018 dates TBC


• SHOCK AND GORE FESTIVAL http://www.shockandgore.co.uk The Electric Cinema in Birmingham, July. Contact david@theelectric.co.uk or https://twitter.com/shockgore July 20 – 26 2018


• DEAFFEST http://www.deaffest.co.uk The UK's International Deaf Film & Arts Festival Wolverhampton. Contact info@light-house.co.uk Friday 17th to Sunday 19th May 2019


• THE UK ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL LEICESTER - http://tonguesonfire.com/ 15 March - 31 March 2018


• SHOUT FESTIVAL http://shoutfestival.co.uk Birmingham Dates TBC for 2018


• DERBY FILM FESTIVAL http://www.derbyfilmfestival.co.uk 4th - 13th MAY 2018


• FANTASTIQ FEST http://fantastiq.co.uk Fantasy/Horror Fest at Quad in Derby (part of Derby Film Fest)


• MAYHEM HORROR Film Fest - Halloween. Contact Broadway cinema in Nottingham http://www.broadway.org.uk/mayhem 11 October - 14 October 2018


• FLATPACK FEST - Birmingham, UK. http://www.flatpackfestival.org.uk 13 - 22 April 2018


• EAST ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL http://www.eastwindsfilmfest.com May 2018


• BEESTON FILM FESTIVAL - https://twitter.com/BeestonFilm 8th - 11th March 2018


• SHROPSHIRE RAINBOW FILM FESTIVAL http://www.rainbowfilmfestival.org.uk/midlands-zone 5th - 7th October 2018


• GRINDHOUSE PLANET - www.grindhouseplanet.com November 2018 TBC


* BOTTLESMOKE FILM FESTIVAL - https://www.facebook.com/BottleSmokeStoke Stoke on Trent, 8th - 9th September 2018


* POCKET FILM FESTIVAL (Unseen cinema) http://www.unseencinema.co.uk/pocket-film-festival-2018/ Stafford 12-17 March 2018


* BIRMINGHAM HORROR GROUP - https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/birmingham-horror-group-mini-movie-marathon-25-march-2018-tickets-41683231668 Mini-Movie Marathon Mini-Movie 25 March 2018


* SHROPSHIRE'S FIRST WORLD WAR FILM FESTIVAL https://twitter.com/wilfredowen100 Oct/Nov TBC 2018


Other useful Film Festival information can be find at these links:

http://www.festivalfocus.org/festival

http://film.britishcouncil.org/festivals-directory/festivals-map

http://www.thefilmfestivaldoctor.co.uk

By midlandsmovies, Mar 13 2018 10:09PM



Leicestershire movie Art is Dead launches on Amazon Prime


Filmed entirely around Leicestershire and the East Midlands, Art Is Dead is a new comedy feature which uses talent from the local region and has recently become available via Amazon streaming services.


The film is described as “the ultimate underdog story” and has already gained reviews describing its “outrageous humour” and “gripping” and “thought-provoking” ideas.


Written, directed and produced by Luke Oliver the film also stars Richard Mason (Scott & Sid and Oscar-winning short film Stutterer), George Newton (This Is England, Paddington) and Mark Peachey (Richard III, Hollyoaks). In a small cameo, there’s even room for Alex Reid from Celebrity Big Brother.


Created by InkyBlue and Gatling Guns Productions the film can now be downloaded via Amazon Prime (click here) and writer-director-actor Luke Oliver trained whilst working in a dingy pub kitchen. From a working-class background himself, Luke almost starved whilst funding himself through acting School.


Eventually he had little option but to leave London and once he returned to the Midlands, he started penning a short film script which would soon become the full-length feature film “Art is Dead”.


The story is biographical somewhat in that a working class actor is oppressed within the “plastic fantastic” entertainment industry due to lack of money.


Luke explains, “The comedy takes a gentle poke at the vulgarity of the wealthy in a world where the working class aren’t given a break. It sees the main character Ant, and his fellow actor friend’s kidnap a wealthy actor Benjamin Cummerbund and reek a night of havoc on the industry’s biggest night of the year”.


Following an initial screening at Coalville’s Century Theatre in February the film has been a labour of love for Luke. He formed the company InkyBlue Productions and started working tirelessly towards his first film and commissioned a local Leicestershire company ‘Gatling Gun Productions’ to provide crew and equipment to make Art is Dead become a reality.


Check out the film's trailer above and order now on Amazon for the full feature.


By midlandsmovies, Feb 5 2018 10:12PM



Local Midlands Artist Creates Draw for Movie and Special Effects Industry


Strangely, after finding their business card randomly in a local Fish and Chip shop, Midlands Movies got in touch with Augmented Imagination Studios in Leicester whose exciting projects and support are helping a new generation of young film creatives.


Augmented Imagination (A.I.) Studios are based in the Midlands and are a special effects-focused business who have a workshop of 3 large classrooms used to support and educate those who seek a route into the film and FX industry.


Run by Toran Tanner, the studios accommodate fine works for movie makers and also create their own unique special effects. With a background in high quality SFX work, the organisation was envisioned as a stepping stone for students to acquire technical training and skills in the industry whilst offering affordable education and shared studio spaces and materials.


With a programme geared towards promoting access to the standards of the industry’s requirements as well as to ensure all levels of interest are met, A.I. offer support, training and mentoring to practising professionals, enthusiasts and those who are just beginning their journey.


Their diverse variety of courses serve both beginner and skilled professional and they hope to provide a relaxing, yet fast paced, learning opportunity in classroom and workshop environments.


The courses also offer an opportunity for students to train and work with some of the most motivated and best special effect artists in the world in a relaxing environment, making their courses fun as well as educational.


A.I. offer extensive studio time to students enrolled allowing for each person to grow at their own pace and Toran believes the studio time is integral to learning and building the needed skills to pursue a career in the industry. As their curriculum continues to evolve, each course will bring new course options as well as a core group of regular courses to meet the needs of students at every level.


With a strong belief in getting your hands dirty, Toran and his team strive to do their best to help students master the techniques required and although they’re not the largest special effects school in the UK, they feel this offers a big advantage for plenty of personalized attention and instruction.


For more information check out their website at https://www.aifxstudios.com/






By midlandsmovies, Nov 27 2017 07:23PM



LEICESTER BASED FILMMAKERS ‘BANG AVERAGE FILMS’ ARE OUT OF THE GATE


‘Bang average’ is a term normally used in relation to something being pretty poor, but Leicester based filmmakers Lee Tomes and Daley Francis and decided to take the saying and give it a positive spin.


“I love the term ‘bang average’, especially in a Scouse accent,” says Francis, the screenwriter and producer of the group. “I can understand people might be scratching their heads when they hear that’s the name of our film group - especially when it’s a negative term - but there’s a reason for it".


The name Bang Average Films comes from the ethos of the filmmaking collective formed by Francis and Tomes - Low-to-no budget films that bring bang for their (lack of) buck.


“These days technology, information and guidance is easily accessible and you can reach millions of people in an instant,” said Lee, the man behind the camera and behind the editing desk. “There are no reasons - or excuses - for filmmakers to not be making films anymore. You can make a film on an iPhone. It might not be cinema ready, but if you’ve got talent it’ll shine through".


The term ‘bang average’ also applies to the ideal that not every film has to be on a level with Kubrick or Nolan. Filmmaking can (and should) be fun and achievable. If it’s not Hollywood standard, who really cares? At the end of the day it’s all about great ideas and great storytelling”.



Lee and Daley have made various short films together in the past, including the boxing mockumentary Rocky Road and the anti-bullying drama Common Ground.


Both films went to festivals and have been well-received, but then came a four year hiatus before Bang Average was formed, with Francis venturing into self-publishing and releasing four novels, and Tomes running Orange Fox Studios, a visual storytelling agency based in Leicester that specialises in making online ads and virals.


“We’ve both continued to tell stories, just in different forms,” Francis explains. “But we’ve always kept in touch and knocked ideas around. We work well together and that shows with our new film Careering".


After deciding that Bang Average Films will focus on 3-8 minute comedy and drama shorts, Francis scripted Careering, a tale about a crazed Careers Advisor who tries to convince college students to abandon their dreams. All in the name of (questionable) fun.


“Careering is a statement of intent, for sure,” said Tomes. “We want to be prolific, we want to have fun and keep the momentum going. But most of all, we want to move people: tears, anger and laughter are all welcome. I can’t wait to work on our next project!”


You can read our review of Careering as well as watch the trailer CLICK HERE


Bang Average official website https://bangaveragefilms.com/


Midlands Movies Mike




By midlandsmovies, Nov 5 2017 09:23AM



For the fourth year in a row now, Midlands Movies takes a look at Leicester Comedy Festival and give our recommendations for some of the best film and movie-related shows that are occurring during the whole of the festival.


Celebrating its 25th Anniversary, the festival takes place place between 7th – 25th February 2018 at various venues around Leicester.


For all info on tickets on the below shows and many many more, please check all the events at the official festival website: http://comedy-festival.co.uk/events/




Joanna Neary

Saturday, 17/Sunday 18 February 2018 Time: 5:50pm (6:50pm) Doors open: 5:30pm

Entry: £5 OR PWYW Venue: Heroes@The Criterion

Joanna Neary / Celia Cardigan in 'Voting And Not Voting.' Middle class housewife Celia investigates 100 years of votes for some women, and asks "what changed and what's next? All Mrs Clack ever says is 'how do you think the horse felt?' “Joanna appeared in the film Suffragette; she has a credit one above Meryl Streep.




Hurt & Anderson: Come What May

Saturday, 24 February 2018 Time: 6:30pm (7:30pm) Doors open: 6:10pm

Entry: £5 OR PWYW Venue: Just the Tonic at BrewDog

Hurt and Anderson are on the edge. Can they make it through their final performance without self-destructing? Will Laura ever stop sabotaging the show? Will Georgia finally admit the awful truth - she's never liked Laura's favourite film Moulin Rouge that much? Come what may, this will be a laugh-out-loud hour of sketch and musical comedy.





An interview with Dave Johns

Saturday, 17 February 2018 Time: 4:30pm (6:00pm) Doors open: 4:10pm

Entry: FREE Venue: PETER Pizzeria - Violin Room

Dave is one of the most respected comedians working in the UK, however, he almost gave up comedy in order to manage donkey rides at Whitley Bay. Come and listen to what happened when he got a call from film Director Ken Loach and went on to star in the critically acclaimed film "I, Daniel Blake" and won the coveted Palme D'Or Award. An interview with Festival Director Geoff Rowe.




CARRY ON: 60 GLORIOUS YEARS with ROBERT ROSS

Saturday, 17 February 2018 Time: 12:30pm (2:00pm) Doors open: 12:10pm

Entry: FREE Venue: PETER Pizzeria - Violin Room

In 1958 cameras started rolling at Pinewood Studios on a comedy film called Carry On Sergeant. The film would become the third biggest box office success in Britain of that year. Sixty years on the franchise is still going strong. A revealing talk illustrated by rare and hilarious behind-the-scenes footage, from the official Carry On historian Robert Ross.




Heidi Vs Sharks: Work in Progress

Saturday, 17 February 2018 Time: 8:30pm (9:30pm) Doors open: 8:10pm

Entry: £5 OR PWYW Venue: Attenborough Arts Centre - Main Hall

Heidi Regan, winner of BBC New Comedy Award 2017 and So You Think You're Funny 2016, explores our increasingly confusing world and terrible shark films.




Cult Comics

Sunday, 11 February 2018 Time: 2:00pm (3:00pm) Doors open: 1:40pm

Entry: FREE OR PWYW Venue: The Exchange Bar - Downstairs

Two award-losing nerds (Sam Golin & Bisha K Ali) present an hour of geek-culture themed stand-up comedy, fun and games. If you're a gamer, a comic book fan, a sci-fi & fantasy buff or addicted to horror movies, Cult Comics is for you. Join us. Resistance is futile.




Clonely

Sunday, 25 February 2018 Time: 3:30pm (4:30pm) Doors open: 3:10pm

Entry: £5 OR PWYW Venue: Brood @ Vin Quatre - 2

Clonely is an adventure in existential sci-fi crisis, a blend of bulls*** art house theatre with sci-fi cinema, but on stage and with DIY props. Expect lo-fi aesthetics, an awkward five-minute docking scene and long monologues about how dark and bleak space life is. Are you afraid of dying aclone?


Rob Kemp: The Elvis Dead

Thursday, 08 February 2018 Time: 8:00pm (9:00pm) Doors open: 7:40pm

Entry: £9.50 Venue: The Y - Standing/Seating

This hit show returns to where it all started, Leicester Comedy Festival. Cult classic horror movie Evil Dead 2 reinterpreted through the songs of Elvis*. A tribute concert to the sequel to the ultimate in gruelling terror... and the King of Rock‘n’Roll. Brilliantly executed: winner of Best Show and Best Musical at Leicester Comedy Festival 2017.




Wizard of Oz

Sunday, 11 February 2018 Time: 5:00pm (7:00pm) Doors open: 4:40pm

Entry: £12.50 Venue: The Y - Row Seating

The "irresistibly anarchic" Oddsocks Productions are bringing another classic adventure to life with a hearty dollop of their trademark comedy: new songs, familiar faces and laughs aplenty! In a brand-new adaptation of L Frank Baum's 'The Wizard of Oz', the Oddsocks troupe invite you to meet Dorothy as you've never seen her before. Join the Scarecrow, Lion and Tin Man as they travel through the weird and wonderful land of Oz.




Happily Never After

Friday, 16 February 2018 Time: 8:00pm (9:00pm) Doors open: 7:40pm

Entry: £10.00 Venue: Just the Tonic at BrewDog

Award-winning improvisers The Maydays present this skin-prickling tale full of black comedy and haunting music, inspired by the warped imaginations of Tim Burton, Lemony Snicket and the Brothers Grimm. Starting with your suggestion, The Maydays take you on a bone-chilling journey, meeting the grotesque and the innocent, weaving a fantastical story that's different every time.




Police Cops In Space

Friday, 23 February 2018 Time: 8:30pm (9:30pm) Doors open: 8:10pm

Entry: £12.00 Venue: Attenborough Arts Centre - Main Hall

Following 3 SELLOUT runs at Soho Theatre with their first production, Police Cops, multi award-winning comedy trio THE PRETEND MEN are back once more with their critically acclaimed Edinburgh Fringe 2017 TOTAL SELL OUT theatrical blockbuster POLICE COPS IN SPACE; an 80's 'low-fi sci-fi' set in the most dangerous place on Earth... Space.




Mission Impossible Ipswich: The Director’s Cut

Saturday, 10/Friday 23 February 2018 Time: 8:00pm (9:00pm) Doors open: 7:40pm

Entry: FREE OR PWYW Venue: Grays@LCB Depot - Lightbox

Tom Cruise is trying to be a bona-fide Hollywood star, but he's lost his mojo and he thinks a provincial East Anglian town in the 1980s and its strange inhabitants can help him. Join us for weirdness. Join us for sexiness. Join us to sing along to some classic tunes from some classic films! This is the director's cut. We've got more baby oil, more gin, more costumes and more dodgy Nicole Kidman accents! Watch the Suffolk craziness unfold!



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