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By midlandsmovies, Jun 14 2018 11:05AM



"They sometimes say real life is scarier than horror movies. Those people just aren't watching the right movies!"


So say the organisers of Shock & Gore, a local festival that launched in July 2011 and looks to bring together audiences and film-makers who have a love of horror, science fiction and fantastic films at the oldest working cinema in the UK.


Returning this summer to The Electric Cinema in Birmingham from Friday 27th July to Sunday 5th August, a host of genre screenings make up the brunt of the festival but they also programme stand-up comedy, Q&As, live choirs and all-night events.


Classics like The Old Dark House and the original Cape Fear are accompanied by new films such as Under The Tree and A Prayer Before Dawn. Cult favourites like Buffy The Vampire Slayer and The Prisoner will also be shown, plus their annual party night marks 20 years of Blade and 50 years of Night Of The Living Dead.


Shock & Gore are also hosting a special screening of Ben Wheatley's anarchic High-Rise at the top of Birmingham's iconic Rotunda building and the popular Trash Film Night will be taking to the seas (or, more accurately, Birmingham's canals) for a floating screening of Shark Attack 3: Megalodon.


And on Thursday 2nd August, Conjurer's Kitchen will be presenting the classic movie The Silence Of The Lambs. Master food artist Annabel de Vetten will be cooking up some devilishly sweet treats to accompany a screening of one of the greatest thrillers of the last thirty years.


With a commitment to celebrating not only the work of established genre filmmakers, but also those looking to get their first break and national exposure, the focal point of the festival is always the official Shock & Gore competition. This is where entries from across the globe will be viewed and awards will be given for Best Feature Film and Best Short Film.


The Shock & Gore 2018 short film showcase takes place on Sunday 29th July at 2pm and offers opportunities for snappy jump scares, extreme set pieces and brief snippets of terror. Previous years have featured films from Japan, Dubai, Canada, the US, France and Italy, as well as a number of home-grown shorts.


And you still have time to enter via FilmFreeway at this link: https://filmfreeway.com/ShockGore


Full listings and the special events programme is online at www.shockandgore.co.uk


Plus you can find the festival on Twitter @ShockGore



By midlandsmovies, Jun 10 2018 08:51AM

12 Underrated films that may have passed you by since 2010


Despite your huge collection of DVDs, BluRays, boxsets, collector’s editions and streaming services, have you ever found yourself staring into space struggling to find a film to watch? With so many options available at just a touch of a button, the choice can be overwhelming. However, we’re going to provide a friendly list for your viewing pleasure as we showcase a dozen great films from the last few years that may have slipped under your radar.


Whether it be quirky documentaries, underground sci-fi or a splash of comedy, we have something for you. Take a read of the list below of our highly recommended, but often little-seen, movies – especially if you’re in the mood for something different to the usual multiplex blockbusters or critics’ darlings. And hit us up on Twitter @midlandsmovies with some of your own suggestions!




Coherence (2014) Dir. James Ward Byrkit

Written and directed by James Ward Byrkit this is an 89 minute thrilling sci-fi mystery set at a suburban USA dinner party that pulls at the audience’s emotions and brainstems equally. The film sets up a dinner meal and after discussion of a passing comet, the electricity goes off and the group explore their neighbourhood which leads to a mysterious occurance.. To say too much would be to spoil the surprise but with a similar tone to the low budget film Primer (2004) as well as the confusing and twisting narrative of Triangle (2009) the handheld realism leads to a brilliantly constructed film that demands a second viewing in order to fully appreciate the looping plot.



Stoker (2013) Dir. Park Chan-wook

A tense psychological thriller from the director who gave us OldBoy, Stoker again covers dark family secrets and was written surprisingly by Wentworth Miller of Prison Break. Avoiding any happy ever after clichés, the film has sinister fairy tale imagery from wooded copses, creepy spiders and phallic rocks to heighten the Hitchcockian themes of betrayal, deception and revenge. A trio of Mia Wasikowska, Matthew Goode and Nicole Kidman, bring strangely winning performances in a social drama with a mythic quality. A far-fetched but fascinating fable.




Tim’s Vermeer (2014) Dir. Teller

Directed by stage magician Teller, this documentary gives us a portrait of Tim Jenison, a man who spends 5 years testing his theory which proposes how Renaissance Dutchman Johannes Vermeer possibly used optical instruments to help create such realistic paintings. A friend of Teller’s magician partner Penn Jillette, Tim comes across as a barmy garage-style bonkers scientist who has worked with computer graphics but has no formal artistic training. In his quest to be authentic, Tim also learns to use traditional methods to render not just the painting he admires but the entire room. The doc constructs a brilliant study of one man’s drive and his crazy courage to complete his personal canvas.




Frank (2014) Dir. Lenny Abrahamson

Based on the idiosyncratic UK comedic stylings of Frank Sidebottom, this movie is a fictionalised account of an eccentric musician trying to find his calling in life. The musical journey is seen through the eyes of Jon (a brilliantly naive Domhnall Gleeson) who leaves his humdrum life to work on an album of bizarre instrumentations and unusual compositions. The lead singer Frank (Michael Fassbender) persistently wears an over-sized homemade head and the film follows the erratic interactions and odd relationships between band members. Fassbender delivers a virtuoso performance as the comical yet infectious front man trying to connect with world he’s closed himself off to in a screwball study of creativity and mental hindrances.




White Bird in a Blizzard (2015) Dir. Gregg Araki

Set in a well-designed 80s of big hair, big phones and bigger boom boxes, the film follows the disappearance of unhappy mother Eve Connor (Eva Green) with flashbacks punctuating the modern day narrative strands to show her daughter Kat (Shailene Woodley) as she explains her drunken mother’s loveless marriage. The film may seem like Gone Girl-lite but its mysterious take on small-town life has echoes of American Beauty with its voiceovers, repressed fathers and dinner table silences. The comparisons continue with a sexless marriage and blossoming sexualised teenagers. The movie bounces easily between cold relationships to seduction secrets to create a winning formula of nosey next-door neighbours and night time naughtiness.




Snowpiercer (2014) Dir. Bong Joon-ho

All aboard for this South Korean/USA action film which tells the story of Curtis, a rebel on a fascist train that encircles the globe now that mankind has caused an accidental ice age. The snow train is a prison with the poor and destitute forced to live in squalor at the tail end whilst the rich live like royalty near the locomotive’s front. Curtis (a bearded Chris Evans) teams up with Edgar (Jamie Bell) and Tanya (Octavia Spencer) to overthrow the guards and with Tilda Swinton as a norther- accented minister with a nasty sadistic side, the movie is an original take on a tested formula. Joon-ho delivers the appropriate amount of fist fights and combines this with his artistic Eastern outlook with some inventive Hollywood-style smack downs. Although the premise is absurd, the audience will be pulled along for the wintery ride enjoying the emotional tracks the director lays out for us.




Joe (2014) Dir. David Gordon Green

After a glut of awful b-movie films, Nic Cage gets to tackle headier material by playing a violent loner in the Deep South where he stars as father figure to Tye Sheridan. We get a sizzling slice of Southern life played out amongst rural blue collar workers who turn to violence whilst trying to maintain their dysfunctional family dynamics. Alongside Cage’s muted dramatic chops and the rusty trucks, the two play out a tragic and cruel drama. The director elicits a cornucopia of emotions as we witness passionate kindred bonding and drunken falling. Cage is perfectly suited to the grizzled everyman and shows why he is still a watchable performer given the right material.




Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films (2014) Dir. Mark Hartley

Following Israeli cousins Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus who in the 1980s bought low-budget scripts to make even lower budget films, this documentary explores the ups and downs of the schlock movie business. Remembered for low budget action “classics” such as the Death Wish franchise as well as Delta Force, the film actually exposes some of the creative risks (but with little money) the cousins took as they tried to reflect, and sometimes create, the trends and fashions of the day. They made entertaining, amusing yet ultimately quite dreadful films but despite the low-low budgets, their productions focus on a sense of fun and the film provides a comedic look on how not to run a studio.




Love & Mercy (2015) Dir. Bill Pohlad

This biographical drama follows the life of Brian Wilson during the height of the Beach Boys’ fame in the 60s and his turbulent later years in the 80s where a confused Wilson deals with controlling advisors. The swinging section has a brilliant Paul Dano focusing on his song-writing whilst in the 80s, Cusack plays a more vulnerable Wilson who gets around with his new wife Melinda (Elizabeth Banks) and Paul Giamatti’s creepy psychotherapist. The Beach Boys’ music punctuates the film as Dano discovers his genius pop-hits and Cusack’s understatement is the flipside of Wilson’s fractured subconscious. Experimental in narrative, the film focuses on the brilliant brain of Brian through 2 different actors in a perfect portrayal of the mastermind musician.




Grand Piano (2014) Dir. Eugenio Mira

In the vein of Buried and Phone Booth Grand Piano is a taught ‘one-location’ thriller where a returning pianist protégé Tom Selznick (Elijah Wood) is threatened with murder during his comeback concert. An assassin promises to shoot him if he gets just one note wrong in his performance and the tension rises as a sniper’s laser sight passes over his sheet music. The pianist comes to terms that both he and his wife in the audience are at the hands of this man as he desperately tries to figure a way out using coded messages to escape with his life. A fast rhythm ratchets up the stakes using creative editing, along with a fantastic score coming from Frodo’s fingers himself. Any low-budget limitations are set aside as Grand Piano plays to its strengths like a fine composer.




As Above So Below (2014) Dir. John Erick Dowdle

Academic Scarlett Marlowe (Perdita Weeks) delves into the catacombs under Paris in a found footage horror as she and her cohorts look for the philosopher’s stone, a powerful but possibly cursed historical relic. The jumps, scares and the Descent-style claustrophobia come across in every frame with the cast filming in the real caves and stone corridors under the City of Light. With a shadowy sense of foreboding around every corridor twist and turn, the concept is as old as the hills but the ancient caves contain enough no-frills shocks for a Saturday night scare-fest.




Life Itself (2014) Dir. Steve James

From the director of the Oscar nominated documentary Hoop Dreams comes this film based upon legendary film critic Roger Ebert's 2011 memoir of the same name. From his humble beginnings as a film critic through to the co-writing of the cult film Beyond the Valley of the Dolls, the film covers the major points of his life using interviews and archive footage as well as excerpts from his infamous show with Gene Siskel. A powerful but humorous writer, Ebert not only scored a Pulitzer for his work, he also helped elevate film criticism and established himself as the foremost authority on the subject. The doc later moves to Ebert’s hard fought struggle with illness but show how great his outlook was, not just through his career around the movies, but as a mantra for life itself.


Midlands Movies Mike


By midlandsmovies, Jun 8 2018 01:02PM




‘BEWARE THE MOON’ RETURNS TO DUDLEY CASTLE THIS AUGUST


Dudley Zoological Gardens are again teaming up with Flatpack Projects and Film Hub Midlands to present the cinema spectacular BEWARE THE MOON.


Dudley Castle will be transformed into a vast open-air cinema for two special events over consecutive nights – George A. Romero’s zombie horror NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD will screen on Friday 3rd August, followed by the vampire cult classic THE LOST BOYS on Saturday 4th August.


Previous events have included spectacular screenings of James Whale’s THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN and John Landis’ AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON in the stunning castle courtyard.


Guests at BEWARE THE MOON can enjoy hot food, a licensed bar and spine-chilling special effects projected onto the historic castle ramparts – with organisers promising even more spooky surprises this year!


BEWARE THE MOON: NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (15)

Friday 3rd August 2018, 9pm

Castle Hill, Dudley, West Midlands,

DY1 4QF


Tickets: £10 (concs £8)

Double Bill Ticket: £18 (concs £14)

Book via https://www.dudleyzoo.org.uk/night-of-the-living-dead/


BEWARE THE MOON: THE LOST BOYS (15)

Saturday 4th August 2018, 9pm

Castle Hill, Dudley, West Midlands,

DY1 4QF


Tickets: £10 (concs £8)

Double Bill Ticket: £18 (concs £14)

Book via https://www.dudleyzoo.org.uk/the-lost-boys/



By midlandsmovies, May 27 2018 07:23AM



Winchester (2018) Dir. Michael and Peter Spierig


Oh Spierig brothers, what happened, guys? 2009 saw their breakthrough hit Daybreakers take an interesting angle on the vampire genre where humans are farmed for their blood whilst Willem Defoe and Ethan Hawke discover a possible cure.


After that came the phenomenal sci-fi short-story adaptation Predestination; a film which presented a twisting time-travel narrative with Ethan Hawke and Sarah Snook and whose clever premise made it our 4th best film of 2015.


Snook is back in their latest movie along with Helen Mirren as heiress Sarah Winchester. The lady of the house is haunted by spirits in her turn of the century mansion. Also along for the (dull) ride is Jason Clarke as Eric Price, a doctor who is sent to diagnose her mental state of mind by the gun company she lends her name to.


Based on the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, California, a real location claimed by many to be haunted by the ghosts of those killed with Winchester rifles to this day, the scares, if you can call them that, begin early. But don’t expect the slow build up needed for these kind of films. Atmosphere? Absolutely nowhere to be seen. Tension? You wish!


Quiet, quiet, quiet then BOOM, a pale looking ghost appears. If that's your thing then fill your boots but for the rest of us that technique is lifeless and predictable.


The endless jump scares and pre-emptive musical stings remove any mood the film was attempting to create and despite some good costume and set design cannot overcome its complete lack of horror in a supposedly horror film.


Unengaging and unsatisfying, the brilliant Helen Mirren sadly fails to bring her gravitas and talent to the one-dimensional character and hackneyed haunted house plot. Lazy, seen-it-all-before jump sequences (oh look, a ghost appears in a moving mirror) and boring corridor explorations make Winchester’s narrative as meandering as the layout of the mansion itself.


Hugely disappointing, the Speirigs previously delivered two exciting genre hits focusing on character, story and interesting themes but with Winchester (and their franchise failure Jigsaw) their career is heading downward in the wrong direction. A lack of true shocks, a boring narrative and scene after scene of dull exposition, not even the talented actors can raise this flop from the dead.


4/10


Midlands Movies Mike



By midlandsmovies, May 25 2018 08:03AM



Derby Film Festival 2018


Midlands Movies writer Guy Russell takes a look at one of the premiere film festivals in the region as he checks out the best of the fest!


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Now in its 5th year, Derby Film Festival is showing no signs of slowing down. Last week I had the pleasure of attending the festival again hosted by QUAD, this year it kicked off on the 4th May followed by ten days of screenings, talks, short films and competitions.


Similar to last year’s sub-festival Fantastiq, the first four days of the festival were dedicated to Paracinema, a celebration of films and genres outside the mainstream including new releases and cult classics. Here are a few of new and cult classics screened during the festival:


Attack of the Adult Babies



Amongst the various films shown during the Paracinema arm of the festival was Attack of the Adult Babies, the latest offering from filmmaker Dominic Brunt. Brunt has built up quite the resume in recent years, his great work within the horror genre alone has gained him the reputation as a director you should definitely look out for when any of his projects hit the shelves.


An ordinary family are forced to break into a country manor to steal top secret information, what they find however are powerful, obese, middle aged men dressed in nappies being tendered to and waited upon by overly sexualised nurses in PVC uniforms. This is not your typical horror film!


The humour comes as quick and thick as the gore which will please both horror and comedy fans. Lines such as “We’re gonna need a bigger nappy” and “I’m going to cut you worse than a state pension” prove how much of an aware, modern film Attack of the Adult Babies is.


Shot on location at Broughton Hall in West Yorkshire, Attack of the Adult Babies joins Brunt’s CV of making socially aware Northern genre films, something not many can boast of. Since the release of The Purge series and last year’s Get Out there has been a revived interest in social-political horror films and after having watched this film I’m of the opinion this deserves a place in the conversation too.


Beneath the absurdity and the gore is an expose of how lazy powerful and greedy men can become, their reliance on others to wash, clean and cook for them here is shown by a regression to infancy.


If you’re after a horror-comedy film with gore and gags in equal measure, then check out this bonkers and brilliant effort. Attack of the Adult Babies is destined to be a cult British film, whether it be this decade or the next.


Attack of the Adult Babies is out on Blu-Ray and DVD on June 11th.


Charismata



Again as part of the Paracinema part of the festival is Charismata, a psychological horror from filmmaking duo Andy Collier and Toor Mian.


Rebecca Faraway (Sarah Beck Mather) is a murder detective working on a series of gruesome killings. As she becomes more involved with the investigation she begins to experience haunting visions which lead her to question her own sanity and state of mind.


I normally enter any independent horror production with an open mind, some can be quite hokey whilst others can surprise you with what they can do with so little. Luckily Charismata falls within the latter category, the cinematography by Fernando Ruiz and the score by Chris Roe give the film a polished and carefully constructed vibe, almost as if millions were spent in producing the picture.


Similar to Attack of the Adult Babies, Charismata feels very socially aware, whether intentional or not. Rebecca lives in a very masculine environment and is constantly under siege with sexist comments and a chauvinistic attitude towards her career as she is the only female on her team.


Acting isn’t usually lauded within the genre however Sarah Beck Mather as Rebecca was sensational. An intriguing portrayal, Mather plays Rebecca as quite a cold person however the character feels pretty well balanced considering the enormous pressure she endures throughout the film.


Whilst the “gore” level is by no means ignored, it is the carefully planned build-up of tension that brings the chills to the audience. I’m unsure when this will be screened again or released widely on home media however I urge any horror fan to seek this one out as Charismata was one of the best surprises of this year’s festival.


Escape from New York



Whilst the festival primarily celebrates fresh talent and brilliant new films, there is always space in the schedule to revel in classic films from yesteryear. This year, the one to catch for me was John Carpenter's science-fiction flick Escape from New York, a quintessential 80’s actioner starring Kurt Russell.


1997, Manhattan, New York has been abandoned and transformed into the perfect maximum security prison but unfortunately, whilst routinely flying over, Air Force One crashes onto the island leaving the President of the United States alive albeit in grave danger from unpredictable and dangerous inmates.


A deal is struck between the Warden and convicted bank robber Snake Plissken (Kurt Russell), to save the president and he will have earned his right to freedom.


Having only seen this film once before it was great to revisit this on the big screen. On the surface you might mistake this as a simple film but a great escapist movie, however knowing Carpenter's work and his love for using genre movies to explore certain themes you can see why critics are of the opinion that Escape from New York uses its dystopic environment to explore class and race issues.


Last year I caught the screening of Billy Wilder’s Ace in the Hole, a film I had never heard of until I watched it. It is now one of my favourite films of its period. I hope this Escape from New York showing had the same effect on someone and long may the festival continue presenting classics.


Overall it has been another successful year for the Derby Film Festival and QUAD as they continue to show a vast range of films across all genres, languages and budgets. I can’t wait to see what the 6th Annual Derby Film Festival holds in 2019. See you there.


Thanks to Peter Munford & Kathy Frain


Guy Russell


Twitter @BudGuyer


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Take a read of Guy's thoughts of the 2018 Derby Film Festival's other events including local documentary Spondon: Portrait of a Village and Five Lamps 24 hour Film Challenge



By midlandsmovies, Apr 17 2018 07:56AM



Derby Film Festival 2018 – special guests, film previews and events in QUAD 4th to 13 May

Derby Film Festival returns from 4th to 13 May with a host of special guests, film previews and events as well as over fifty feature films.


Guests include actress and singer Toyah Willcox will discuss her career in film and television, from her debut in the television play Glitter in 1976, to Derek Jarman’s seminal punk film Jubilee and his version of The Tempest. She has also featured in films including Quadrophenia and Quatermass, and on BBC TV in Dr Jeykll and Mr Hyde and Tales Of The Unexpected. Toyah Willcox will be in Conversation in QUAD on Saturday 5th May at 5:00pm. Both Jubilee (15) and The Tempest (15) will be screened as part of the festival on 8th & 9th and 9th & 10th May respectively.


Sir John Hurt's widow Anwen Hurt will introduce a preview screening of That Good Night – Hurt’s final leading role. Sir John Hurt was QUAD’s first Patron and Derby Film Festival’s Guest Of Honour in 2014. That Good Night (12A) Preview introduced by Anwen Hurt, takes place in QUAD on Wednesday 9th May at 6:30pm.


And Mandie Fletcher who will discuss her career in film and television, directing classics of British television, from Butterflies in 1983, to Blackadder, Only Fools And Horses, Desmond’s, Absolutely Fabulous and Miranda, and the big screen, with Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie in 2016. Mandie Fletcher will be in Conversation in QUAD on Sunday 13th May at 2:00pm


Exclusive film Previews include:

Redoubtable from the Oscar winning director of The Artist on Friday 4th May at 8:40pm. L’Amant Double, the latest release from French auteur Director François Ozon on Monday 7th May at 9:00pm. Jeune Femme the debut film of director Léonor Serraille on Tuesday 8th May at 6:30pm. Edie starring Sheila Hancock on Wednesday 9th May at 2:00pm. Ismael’s Ghosts starring Marion Cotillard and Mathieu Almaric on Thursday 10th May at 6:30pm. On Chesil Beach adapted from the novel by Ian McEwan on Friday 11th May at 6:30pm. The Suffering Of Ninko, from Japan, is a unique tale which blends live action and animation on Friday 11th May at 8:45pm. The Bookshop starring Emily Mortimer and Bill Nighy on Saturday 12th May at 7:00pm.


Festival films with a local interest include:

Portrait Of A Village is an affectionate portrayal of a semi-rural village in the East Midlands – Spondon - by local filmmaker Mark Rivers. Portrait Of A Village is a snapshot of life in modern Britain and explores the themes of home, community and belonging. Portrait Of A Village screens in QUAD on Saturday 12th May at 12:30pm.


A programme of short films, specially curated and tailored specifically to the needs of D/deaf cinema-goers, will include the Oscar-winning The Silent Child. Lives In Sign Language has been curated by London Short Film Festival’s young Deaf programmer Zoë McWhinney and shows the richness of D/deaf culture and experience. A mixture of comedy, romance, horror bring the stories of D/deaf characters to the screen in a selection of contemporary short films inclusive for all. The films include: Nonsense,


The Silent Child, My House, Imagine, Deaf, A Love Divided and Dawn Of The Deaf. Lives In Sign Language (Advised 15) will screen in QUAD on Saturday 12th May at 5:00pm. There will be Hard Of Hearing subtitles and BSL Interpretation.


Derby Based screenwriters Darrell Buxton and Steve Hardy will be on hand to introduce a Premiere of their film Ouijageist. In the film a young single mum moves to her new flat, and adds to the pressures of finding employment and meeting the rent when she and a friend begin dabbling with a Ouija board found at the property, consequently evil powers are unleashed and mysterious deaths begin to occur. Ouijageist (Advised 15) and Screenwriters Q+A takes place in QUAD on Sunday 6th May at 2:00pm.



This year welcomes a new strand called Paracinema, as part of the main festival. Including horror, sci-fi and fantasy films, it will also be exploring other genres outside the mainstream with special guests, previews and talks on a whole range of unusual genres and subgenres. Paracinema screenings, as part of Derby Film Festival, take place from 4th to 7th May. A Paracinema takeover will include a whole night of screenings on the opening weekend of the festival. The Paracinema All Night Takeover! (18) takes place in QUAD on Saturday 5th May, from 10:25pm to dawn.


Among the special events for Derby Film Festival, Derby Cathedral will host a screening of silent classic accompanied by a live score on the Cathedral’s Compton organ. The score will be performed by Richard Hills, organist of St Mary's, Bourne Street, who was named 'Organist of the Year' in 2010 by the American Theatre Organ Society. F.W. Murnau’s classic vampire tale Nosferatu, from 1922, stars the legendary Max Schreck in the title role. Nosferatu + Live Score (PG) takes place in Derby Cathedral on Saturday 5th May, doors open from 7:30pm.


Closing the Festival is the unique Five Lamps Films 24 Hour Challenge. Returning for its ninth year, the Five/24 24hr film challenge entrants will make a three-minute short in just twenty-four hours, over the weekend of 5th and 6th May. The following weekend the public are invited to a screening of all the entries and announcement of the winners. Five Lamps Films 24 Hour Challenge Screening & Prize Ceremony takes place in QUAD on Sunday 13th May at 8:15pm. For more information on how to take part, please see: www.fivelampsfilms.co.uk

For full information on Derby Film Festival films, screening times and ticket prices please go to https://derbyfilmfestival.co.uk

FULL LISTINGS


FRIDAY 4TH MAY

12:00 LEON MUST DIE (ADVISED 18) S - UK PREMIERE

12:00 SOMETHING (ADVISED 15) - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

13:35 BODIES (ADVISED 15) - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

13:50 ALL LIGHT WILL END (ADVISED 18) - UK PREMIERE

15:30 OUT OF THE CORNER OF THE EYE (ADVISED 15) S - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

15:35 HI-DEATH (ADVISED 18) - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

17:45 IMAGES OF APARTHEID (ADVISED 15) - WORLD PREMIERE + DIRECTOR Q+A

18:00 CHARISMATA (ADVISED 18)

19:45 ATTACK OF THE ADULT BABIES (ADVISED 18) + DIRECTOR & CAST Q+A

20:40 REDOUBTABLE (15) S – PREVIEW

21:00 THE PARACINEMA SOCIAL


SATURDAY 5TH MAY

10:00 THE PARACINEMA DEALERS ROOM

12:30 DEATH LAID AN EGG (18) S + NUCLEUS FILMS RESTORING CLASSICS INTRO

15:00 BORLEY RECTORY (ADVISED 15) + DIRECTOR Q+A

17:00 TOYAH WILLCOX IN CONVERSATION

18:45 ALL LIGHT WILL END (ADVISED 18) - UK PREMIERE

19:00 JUBILEE (15)

19:30 NOSFERATU (PG) + LIVE SCORE AT DERBY CATHEDRAL

20:45 HIPPOPOTAMUS (ADVISED 18)

22:25 THE PARACINEMA ALL NIGHT TAKEOVER! (18)


SUNDAY 6TH MAY

13:00 AN INTRODUCTION TO PINK CINEMA BY JASPER SHARP (ADVISED 18)

14:30 THE GLAMOROUS LIFE OF SACHIKO HANAI (ADVISED 18) S

14:30 PARACINEMA SHORTS (ADVISED 18)

16:20 THE ENDLESS (15) - PREVIEW

16:40 A TASTE OF PHOBIA (ADVISED 18) - WORLD PREMIERE

18:30 THE ASCENT (ADVISED 15) - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

18:30 SOMETHING (ADVISED 15) - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

20:30 THE LEGENDARY PARACINEMA QUIZ

20:30 REVENGE (18) - PREVIEW


MONDAY 7TH MAY

12:00 HI-DEATH (ADVISED 18) - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

14:00 HIPPOPOTAMUS (ADVISED 18)

14:00 OUIJAGEIST (ADVISED 15) - WORLD PREMIERE + SCREENWRITERS Q+A

14:00 A.I. STUDIOS MAKE UP EFFECTS DEMONSTRATION

15:35 CHARISMATA (ADVISED 18)

16:25 ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK (15)

17:30 LEON MUST DIE (ADVISED 18) S - UK PREMIERE

19:05 BODIES (ADVISED 15) - EUROPEAN PREMIERE

21:00 L'AMANT DOUBLE (CERT TBC) S - PREVEW

21:00 OUT OF THE CORNER OF THE EYE (ADVISED 15) S - EUROPEAN PREMIERE


TUESDAY 8TH MAY

12:00 EAT MY SHORTS 1 (ADVISED 18)

12:10 JUBILEE (15)

14:20 MARISA IN THE WOODS (ADVISED 15) S

16:10 HUNTER'S CROSSING (ADVISED 15)

18:15 THE MAN WHO ALWAYS DID HIS PART (ADVISED 15) S

18:30 JEUNE FEMME (15) S - PREVIEW

20:35 BACKSTAGE JAZZ MYSTERY (ADVISED 15) S

20:35 JUBILEE (15)


WEDNESDAY 9TH MAY

12:00 THE TEMPEST (15)

12:00 EAT MY SHORTS 2 (ADVISED 15)

14:00 EDIE (12A) - MIDWEEK TREAT PREVIEW

14:15 JUBILEE (15)

16:25 VISMRIT (ADVISED 15) S

18:00 THE TEMPEST (15)

18:30 THAT GOOD NIGHT (12A) - PREVIEW

20:00 MUSIC ON THE RUN (ADVISED 15) S

20:45 JUBILEE (15)

21:10 HUNTER'S CROSSING (ADVISED 15)


THURSDAY 10TH MAY

13:30 THE TEMPEST (15)

15:00 THE MAN WHO ALWAYS DID HIS PART (ADVISED 15) S

16:00 EAT MY SHORTS 3 (ADVISED 15)

17:00 MUSIC ON THE RUN (ADVISED 15) S

18:30 ISMAEL'S GHOSTS (CERT TBC) S – PREVIEW

20:45 THE TEMPEST (15)


FRIDAY 11TH MAY

14:50 THE KURODIANS (ADVISED 15) S

16:30 BACKSTAGE JAZZ MYSTERY (ADVISED 15) S

18:30 ON CHESIL BEACH (15) - PREVIEW

18:45 MARISA IN THE WOODS (ADVISED 15) S

20:35 LEAVE NOW (ADVISED 15)

20:45 SATORI SCREEN: SUFFERING OF NINKO (ADV 18) - UK PREMIERE S


SATURDAY 12TH MAY

12:00 PORTRAIT OF A VILLAGE (ADV 12A) – WORLD PREMIERE

15:00 QUAD YOUNG ADVOCATES PRESENT SHARKNADO (15)

17:00 LIVES IN SIGN LANGUAGE (ADVISED 15)

18:30 EAT MY SHORTS 1 (ADVISED 18)

19:00 THE BOOKSHOP (PG) - PREVIEW

20:40 EAT MY SHORTS 2 (ADVISED 15)

21:15 THE KURODIANS (ADVISED 15) S


SUNDAY 13TH MAY

14:00 MANDIE FLETCHER IN CONVERSATION

14:00 LEAVE NOW (ADVISED 15)

16:25 VISMRIT (ADVISED 15) S

18:00 EAT MY SHORTS 3 (ADVISED 15)

20:15 FIVE LAMPS FILMS 24 HOUR CHALLENGE SCREENING & PRIZE CEREMONY




By midlandsmovies, Apr 10 2018 05:23PM



Midlands Movies Interview - Going Behind the Lens with Jordan Dean


Local filmmaker Jordan Dean came to Leicester’s De Montfort University from Hull at the age of 22 and grew up like so many did with Spielberg and Star Wars as his first foray into film. We speak to this exciting new local filmmaker about his influences, film music and the uncomfortableness of watching audition tapes.


Midlands Movies: Hi Jordan. Glad you could join today. You mention you got into film via Spielberg?

Jordan Dean: Yes I did, but as a kid I was always asking how they managed to create these fantastical worlds!


MM: And getting older how did you end up in your current position?

JD: Well my love for film as a youngster developed into working for Bizarre Culture where I was their film and media editor. I wrote articles and reviews before studying film at DMU in Leicester. It was a very academic weighted degree but at a very highly regarded film university.


MM: And what did you learn during those years?

JD: Well, I made some terrible and awful stuff in my first year [laughs]. But by my third year I had learnt a lot so chose to make a film rather than do a written dissertation. By doing that I tried to prove to myself I could handle a larger production. I actually had 27 cast and crew for a 7-minute short. This included costume designers, extras, fashion models and the like. It really helped me learn different skills, got me a first in my degree and then played at 5 festivals winning a cinematography award at one of them. That was when I thought - I can do this!


MM: I went to the same University funnily enough from 1998-2001 and we only had video in year 1! It moved very quickly to digital.

JD: Ha ha. I would love to shoot on film but producers say think about the money!


MM: So where are you now in your career?

JD: Well now I am undertaking an MA in Film Production with DMU and Pinewood Studios which is exciting. I get to work every week with Terry Bamber (first assistant director on films such as Gulliver’s Travels and World War Z), Chris Kenny and Iain Smith, producer of Mad Max: Fury Road. It’s a real high calibre of people to learn from.


MM: Sounds very rewarding. What projects have you made?

JD: I worked on Not Alone which was actually a film to test equipment but has recently won a short film award at the Direct Short Online Film Festival. In addition I’ve been working with Rhys Davies on his upcoming feature Acid Daemons (click here for info on that film).



MM: You also made Behind the Lens which was nominated for a Midlands Movies Award in 2018 for best score for Peter Flint (click here). What were your influences for that film?

JD: Both of us were influenced by Drive and Neon Demon composer Cliff Martinez. I also love John Carpenter and got great feedback from Terry (Bamber) that Not Alone was Carpenter-esque which was fantastic to hear.


MM: It’s great to have recognition from someone who has been in the industry for a long time. I have seen in the Midlands that those connections and recommendations can really help (and inspire) local independent filmmakers move forward in their work.

JD: Yes and also give you the feeling that you do know what you’re doing. I’m not the best at networking and its great to be at Pinewood to meet people but also at the Midlands Movies film awards where I met likeminded filmmakers from the region.


MM: With local filmmakers like Gareth Edwards, who jumped from editing Monsters in his home to Godzilla and then to Star Wars, is he an example of how low budget can spiral to the big time no matter how unlikely? Does that help motivate you?

JD: It’s really inspiring to see those journeys, of course. I also love sci-fi. E.T. is one of my all -time favourite films. I’d love to make a film in that genre but I feel I would need the resources to do justice to the ideas I would want to convey. My main focus right now is horror. I’m obsessed with scary films since seeing The Texas Chainsaw Massacre when I was younger.


MM: I definitely noticed a Neon Demon influence in Behind the Lens

JD: My biggest influence right now actually is Nicholas Winding Refn. I know he’s not for everyone but I love his films. Over the last few years I’ve also enjoyed a variety of horrors such as The Babadook and It Follows. I’m not a fan of the current jump-scare style movies though.




MM: I found the recent version of IT a surprise success for Hollywood horror but its musical stings were warnings which gave away the approaching scares. Do you like foreign horrors though?

JD: I think you feel more vulnerable watching a foreign horror giving the investment you have to make. I am a huge fan of Asian extreme horror and my next film is heavily influenced by Park Chan-Wook’s The Handmaiden.


MM: Are there any other genres you would like to dip your toe into?

JD: I don’t want to be a genre filmmaker as such. As a fan of Refn, if you showed Neon Demon to someone they may not consider it a horror. I would like to do similar and mix genres up but I was also exhausted by the end of The Witch as it built up tension without giving the audience a release. I wouldn’t mind trying a straight-up drama and tell a simpler story as well.


MM: Where do you get your ideas from?

JD: Behind the Lens is very much influenced by the photographer character from the Neon Demon and realised I had alos met those type of creepy, really intense characters.

MM: Voyeuristic?

JD: Very much so. I can get uncomfortable myself looking at audition tapes that I get sent given the nature of it.


MM: And where next for you?

JD: The next film is The Nail That Sticks Out whose title is taken from a Japanese proverb. It’s the first film I’m directing that I haven’t written. Rebecca Whelan has written a great script and I was instantly attracted to it as it has a tone and themes I can relate to myself.


MM: And what’s the story of the film without giving too much away?

JD: It’s about a Japanese artist living in England and her girlfriend is a failing English actress. It’s about culture clashes and how far different people are willing to go to produce their art. The two characters go in very different directions.


MM: And how far into production are you?

JD: We're making the crowdfunding promo this week and it’s the most ambitious project I’ve ever been involved in. We’re shooting at the end of July in the Midlands at Scene Studios in Nottingham and location shooting at DMU as well. It also has an all Midlands based crew and we're looking to raise an £8000 budget which feels ominous but we’re hoping for success once we launch.


MM: And what’s changed for you on all of these projects?

JD: It’s a scary thing to undertake these different films. Especially when you can’t always pay people when you are starting out and there are very difficult thing to manage on small productions. Now we’ve got a group of people involved – including a producer – there’s a move away from checking the sound and lighting etc yourself. There’s people you can trust in all the roles within the crew. And Peter Flint will be again working with me on the score so we’re discussing that right now.


MM: That must be a relief?

JD: To an extent. My first real production (Acid Daemons) I was working with others and I took the advice that if I had a full understanding of how film works – not just your own role – then you understand the departments and their processes. By having a little bit of knowledge about each department you can respect their craft.


MM: Thanks Jordan. Any final thoughts or help for other local filmmakers?

JD: Don’t be scared of feedback. I have a weird thing as I think I encourage criticism as it’s the only way you learn. Friends and parents will go “it’s great” but you can’t ride that for long otherwise you won’t get anywhere.


Follow Jordan Dean for updates on all his projects on his Twitter feed here: https://twitter.com/Jordandeanfilm






By midlandsmovies, Apr 7 2018 12:43PM



Midlands Spotlight - Don't Follow the Light


After the success of his psychological horror and Midlands Movies Award-nominated The Telephone, Derbyshire writer-director Stuart Connock Wheeldon is again delving into the world of independent cinema with his new film Don't Follow the Light.


Stepping into the preproduction phase this short will be filmed in and around the Derbyshire countryside during the summer of 2018 and Don't Follow the Light is a prequel to the filmmaker’s much-talked-about production concept for Vanished which is gaining a cult following on social media.


That film is to be a smart spin on misadventure and mystery and Stuart says Vanished has already attracted the interest and support of industry professionals.


The prequel - which now seeks funding - pre-empts the story of Gillian Gold, who is described by the filmmaker as the ‘Banksy of Journalism’ and a tenacious investigative journalist. Stuart has been influenced by Hitchcock as Don't Follow the Light is set amongst a succession of unsolved murders and the disappearance of Gold herself.


A range of fine actors has already been chosen for production with Lana O'Kell set to play Gillian Gold and Nigel Barber will be joining the cast in the role of Dr. Williams. Paul Dewdney will play Dr. Childs and Dilly Evans-Smith has landed the role of Jessica.


Stuart hopes all these acclaimed actors will bring an engaging mix of experiences and will add heart and soul (“not to mention a degree of ruthlessness”) to the characters.


His production company Nine Ladies Film is now about to undertake a crowdfunding campaign. Stuart is joined by Nick John Whittle as producers of the film and they plan to get together a working budget to realise this early chapter in the Gillian Gold story.


He hopes that with the help of a generous public who enjoy independent film, Don’t Follow the Light's dark ideas can be expressed in full once production is underway.


For more information visit The Vanished Film website to find contact details and updates about the crowdfunding page http://vanishedfilm.org



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