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By midlandsmovies, Jan 3 2018 09:13AM

Midlands Movies Writers Top Films of 2017


There's been so many good films out in 2017 that it was difficult for me (Midlands Movies Mike) to choose just 20 for a list of my favourite films of the last 12 months.


Well, we've also got some of our writers' favourite films who had an equally difficult choice to make.


First up is Robb Sheppard who said "it was tough" but amazingly got it down to just 5 excellent films


Robb's Top Films 2017


5. Thor: Ragnarok

4. Get Out

3. Personal Shopper

2. Logan

1. Blade Runner 2049





Check out and follow Robb's further film updates at https://twitter.com/RedBezzle


Up next is Kira Comerford who had honourable mentions to Gerald’s Game, To The Bone and Hidden Figures but slimmed down her choices to the 10 fantastic movies below.


Kira's Top Films 2017


10. Moonlight

9. Jackie

8. Mother!

7. Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2

6. Wonder Woman

5. Manchester By The Sea

4. The Disaster Artist

3. It

2. Baby Driver

1. Dunkirk




Follow Kira at https://twitter.com/FilmAndTV101


Finally , Guy Russell chooses his best from 2017....


9. The Greatest Showman

I can’t remember the last time I saw a musical so feel-good in the cinemas. Hugh Jackman was born to sing, act and dance. A true story if a little manipulated, The Greatest Showman tells the story of P.T Barnum, a hopeless visionary whose dream to entertain and create gave birth to what we now know as the circus. A brilliant and catchy soundtrack, along with the old Hollywood sets, costumes makes this my guilty pleasure of 2017.


8. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.2

The Guardians return in the craziest series within the Marvel universe. Whilst I’m not the biggest superhero fan, there is something unique about these two films that gets me to revisit them again and again. This time The Guardians help their leader Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) uncover the truth behind his biological father. Just like the first entry, James Gunn writes and directs a crazy and witty blockbuster that sets itself apart from the other Marvel entries.


7. Hacksaw Ridge

Another war film but this time from director Mel Gibson who tells the story of soldier Desmond Doss (Andrew Garfield) a conscientious objector who served during WW2 in Japan. Refusing to kill the opposition he faces adversity from his peers and fellow soldiers, even more so when the troop find themselves in midst of war whilst on Hacksaw Ridge. A visceral war film by Gibson however he focuses on faith, courage and patriotism like many of his other films. This one will stand the test of time.


6. It

A band of mistreated kids group together when the mysterious Pennywise the Clown (Bill Skarsgard) begins hunting the towns children. Not having seen the original 80s miniseries I went into this film with fresh eyes, not knowing what to expect, I came out with a firm belief that the horror genre is alive and well thanks to director Andy Muschietti who blends comedy with the macabre excellently. If you like Stranger Things or Stand by Me then this film is a must.


5. Dunkirk

Not my favourite Christopher Nolan film by a long shot, however Dunkirk is still an impressive bit of filmmaking. A dramatic account of the evacuation of Dunkirk during WW2, Nolan concentrates on three aspects of the evacuation, land, sea and air. Expertly giving equal time to each service, showing exactly how frantic and grave the situation was. Dunkirk doesn’t spend time on character development or background into the war, aspects I wasn’t a fan of when first viewed however I think a second viewing will prepare me better.


4. War for the Planet of the Apes

You could be forgiven for thinking this instalment of the Apes franchise was a WW2 film. Gun wielding maniacs on horses. However this is the third and supposedly final instalment of the Apes trilogy directed by Matt Reeves. This film honours the films before it as well as rounding up the trilogy in a satisfying manner. Another knock out performance by Andy Serkis as Caesar, the leader who leads a team of apes to retrieve his son from The Colonel (Woody Harrelson).


3. Get Out

Directed by comedy maestro Jordan Peele, his first feature film Get Out impressed critics and audiences alike. Chris is invited by his girlfriend Rose to spend the weekend at her parents’ house, introducing him to them for the first time. Embarrassingly the family make Chris’s skin colour an issue albeit a well-meaning though ludicrous issue. Peele’s debut spoke volumes to the masses in the midst of a vocal topic in America. Race. This is a popular movie that mattered.


2. Manchester by the Sea

An apartment handyman (Casey Affleck) becomes the legal guardian of his nephew when his brother passes away suddenly. I have never seen grief depicted in such an unflinching way before on film, director and writer Kenneth Lonergan handles the subject matter with a gentle hand allowing the audience to connect with the characters instead of just pitying them.


1. Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Loved by critics, hated by (a lot) of fans. I was one of the few fans of the Star Wars saga who was glued to their seat for the entirety of the films run time. Excellent action sequences, a complex villain, brilliant score and fantastic vision by Rian Johnson make Last Jedi the best cinema experience of 2017.



By midlandsmovies, Aug 6 2017 07:02PM



Dunkirk (2017) Dir. Christopher Nolan


Allied soldiers are surrounded by the German army and evacuated during World War II.


Between May 26th and June 4th in 1940, 400,000 British soldiers found themselves surrounded on the beach of Dunkirk with no ships to take them home. Britain’s Prime Minister Winston Churchill put the call out to the public that their boys needed help, and so help came. They aimed for 30,000 boats, but got 300,000 in a feat that remains just as astonishing today is it did back then.


Straight away I’ll come out and say that Dunkirk is probably the best war film I’ve ever seen. Christopher Nolan has done a fantastic job with this film. I absolutely loved it! I think we have a serious contender for Oscars here with this one, although I am unsure whether any will be for the acting because of the ensemble line-up.


There were so many great performances in this film, and what was so good about it was those making their acting debuts got as much screen time as the more experienced cast members. Fionn Whitehead was excellent. You really got the impression of a young boy way out of his depth with his performance.


Harry Styles is actually capable of some decent acting - who’d have thought it? And then you have the people who we could refer to as the veterans in this particular film. Cillian Murphy gave a very good performance as one of the soldiers who were rescued out at sea. The shock and pain that he was experiencing was something that you felt as well. Mark Rylance played Mr Dawson, one of the civilians closely followed in the film.


I think if any of the cast are to be nominated for any awards and are likely to win, it will be him. I think his was the most complex character of the lot because I think he helped to show the impact the war had back home, yet how much the public were willing to do. Finally, I would just like to kindly point out that Tom Hardy was in this film and I can conclude that he has done more acting with just his eyes during his career than anyone else has done with their whole body. 


While performances were a key part of the film, what set it apart from so many other war films were all the other elements that contribute to the film-making process. The cinema screening I went to was truly immersive, and I didn’t even see it in IMAX, so you can imagine how much more mind-blowing it would’ve been if I had.


The sound was awesome, making you feel as though the bombs were being dropped metres from you. The camera work for all of the scenes with the fighter jets was on another level entirely. When the planes moved, the camera moved with it (maybe not recommended for those with motion sickness, but hey, sometimes you just have to toughen up a little), and as I was watching these scenes unfold, I found myself moving with the picture. It was honestly like being in a flight simulator at times - phenomenal cinematography.


Of course, with this being a Christopher Nolan film, which means it was never going to be a simple, run-of-the-mill beginning, middle and end narrative. This was one thing I had been slightly concerned about because my little head has been unable to wrap itself around some of the plots in his previous films. However, ladies and gentlemen, I am pleased to inform you that even I managed to figure the timeline out here, and also believe it to have greatly enhanced the film as it gave it a real-time, play by play vibe, which added to the feeling that you were right there in the middle of the action.


Overall, Dunkirk is a knock-out. It’s a grown-up film that can be enjoyed by the younger generations, and works to give a three-dimensional view of how events played out during this amazing operation that took place in WWII. It combines terrific performances with a score that ratchets tension perfectly, and visuals that place you right at the heart of the action. Has Nolan excelled himself here? Hell yeah!


10/10


Kira Comerford

https://twitter.com/FilmAndTV101

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