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By midlandsmovies, Nov 19 2018 12:40PM



Midlands Review - Teddy Bears Live Forever


Directed by Fabrizio Federico


Very rarely am I lost for words. I must admit that after watching Teddy Bears Live Forever, I experienced one of those occasions.


The film follows April, a young former ‘It’ girl who is effectively in exile after establishing multiple personality disorder, brought on following her time in Hollywood and as part of a UFO cult. As she embarks on a downwards spiral, April decides that is time for one of her six personalities to lose her virginity. In a solitary room, she starts to suffer bizarre flashbacks, sleepwalking, phoning rent boys, and listening to The Carpenters, whilst terrorizing her old guardian.


There is something very odd about every aspect of this film. The narrative, the structure, the look - all these things have been put together in such a way that is creates a massive disconnect between the film and its audience. For me personally, I was a little too detached from what was going on, and so found it quite difficult to stick with the film. However, I can see what the team behind it was going for with their approach. It felt like they tried to cause the viewer to experience some of the feelings that our lead character, April, was going through. She was isolated, and never really connected with anything that was going on around her. The story and the edit made it feel like this was a sensation they were aiming to create for the viewer as well, but like I said, I found it was a little too extreme and it missed me somewhat.


The film had a kind of found-footage/documentary feel to it, presumably to achieve the same effect that the writing hoped for. That was more of a hit for me. I couldn’t quite make sense of what was going on with the visuals, which I think worked well in bringing me closer to what April was experiencing herself.


It also gave the film an edgier appearance that certainly suited all its other aspects.


There were more than a few occasions where I found myself wondering what the hell had just happened. So much just doesn’t make sense. It is a very surreal film that seems to launch numerous relentless attacks on its viewer. I heard things that nearly made my eyes pop out of my head; I saw things that made me wish they had. As much as I tried to just go with the flow here, it just was not happening.


Teddy Bears Live Forever is just a very bizarre film. It’s almost like its main objective is to get its viewers talking about what they’ve just watched, which admittedly, seems to be a trend with some of the big Hollywood releases at the minute as well, so it definitely fits into the current bigger picture. It aims to create a visceral experience for its viewer, which on this occasion I have to say it didn’t quite hit the mark.


I think with a more open mind, a greater willingness to just go with it, and to resist questioning what is happening, more could be taken from it, however I don’t believe I can have the final say on that. It’s something that you can only experience for yourself in order to make your own mind up. I’m afraid that I can’t do that for you. I struggled to do it for myself, to be honest.


4/10


Kira Comerford


Twitter @FilmAndTV101


By midlandsmovies, Nov 2 2018 10:21PM



Midlands Spotlight - Aurora


Midlands Movies editor Mike Sales discovers new local short film Aurora from regional filmmaker Louis Brough. From its fairy tale roots to an extended post-production period, the film has had a rocky road to completion but is close to release through the hard work of a dedicated cast and crew.


Inspired by the beloved fairy tale "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods", new Midlands short Aurora follows a young teenage girl and her journey of self-discovery before the curse placed on her at birth takes over.


And although the film finished shooting in July of last year, since then local director Louis Brough has been deep in post-production but it’s not quite a ‘happy ever after’ just yet.


After losing the original composers, the score was rewritten and the mixing was a long process which the production spent a long time perfecting. And visual effects had a difficult task in removing telegraph poles and creating a floating book but, in his own words, "finally we are ready to submit the film to festivals and share it with the world”, says Louis.


“We had an amazing shoot in Hampshire's New Forest, capturing some terrific performances and have developed a beautiful and unique story”.



Alongside Louis is co-director and award-winning actress Natalie Martins and Louis explains, like the best old tales of yore, the idea has been gestating for a very long time.


“I originally wrote this idea down when I was 11 and decided this is a good time to develop this project. And after speaking to Natalie about it we both fell in love with the idea of exploring a coming of age story in a fairy tale setting”.


Louis adds, “Together we want to explore the character of Sleeping Beauty in much more detail than what has previously been explored in other adaptations of this classic tale. We will spend time with her and witness her reaction as she is told about the curse that has been following her for her entire life”.

This coming of age fantasy tale is an exploration of the Sleeping Beauty story told from the perspective of the girl who will fall asleep at the end of the film.


And although the audience may know that it ultimately has a happy ending owing to its many retellings, Louis hopes the intrigue will come from not knowing anything about this girl who will be awakened by true love's kiss.


And Louis suggests the film uses the familiarity to explore many more new ideas and themes.


"The concept of Aurora uses a tale we all know very well, but delves into depths which are likely to remain in the audience's minds for some time”.


The video of their funding campaign can be viewed below and check out the film’s updates on Facebook:


www.facebook.com/scarlettlightmedia





By midlandsmovies, Oct 4 2018 09:02AM



Student filmmaker tackles dark drama in new short film Terminal


Ben Evans is a student filmmaker studying in Derby who has created a new short film project called ’Terminal’ which he has written and also directed in 2018.


Starring Sophie Bloor from BBC One's 'In the Dark', the film is a short drama about the mental health of a young character towards the end of her life.


A tough uncompromising look at illness, ‘Terminal’ tells the story of Ellie (Sophie Bloor) who is diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis at the age of eight. With her father soon walking out on her, the story is picked up eleven years later. And he returns to find Ellie on her deathbed hoping to be part of her life again.


Joining Sophie will be Alix Ashurst as Helen, David Castleford as Mark, Tom Hendryk as the doctor and actress Ellie Jackson as a young Ellie.


Crew wise Ben is excited to have Jon Altham from SoundWave Studios on board to compose music on 'Terminal' and has just released the official poster for the film to the public (see above).


And with the filmmaker currently deep in post-production, Ben has high hopes for his short and is already looking at entering the film onto the festival circuit later in 2019.


Check out the full information about the film over on IMDB here:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8570308/?ref_=rvi_tt


And for regular updates follow the film’s social media at Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Terminal-Short-Film-1513325858777724





By midlandsmovies, Sep 24 2018 06:08PM



Derby QUAD celebrates 10-Year Anniversary


On Wednesday 26th September 2018, Derby QUAD will be turning 10 years old and we take a look back over the past decade of some of its highlights and why it plays a pivotal role in the region’s film community.


QUAD is a long-established creative hub that connects people and businesses to art and film and creates opportunities for entertainment, education and participation.


Originally Metro Cinema was Derby's only independent cinema with screenings at the Playhouse theatre until the cinema opened on Green Lane in January 1981, at the original site of the Derby Central School of Art.


Metro then moved at the end of 2006 to a temporary home in The Heap Lecture Theatre at the University of Derby on Kedleston Road before the projection equipment was then removed and prepared for installation in QUAD.


And QUAD has been booming ever since. As a registered independent charity, it also receives funding from a variety of sources including Derby City Council and Arts Council England to help create and support exhibitions and outreach work. And also provides creative opportunities for thousands of people every year.



A notable highlight at QUAD of course is the annual Derby Film Festival which we have covered a number of times since its inception. With amazing guests & fantastic film previews, the Derby Film Festival (DFF) has been running in QUAD since 2010. The festival’s prestigious patrons are actor David Morrissey and Anwen Hurt and it has seen many famous film faces arrive as guests over the years.


These include actor Simon Callow, actress Julie Peasgood, Sir Ben Kingsley, actor Jenny Agutter, directors Peter Sasdy and Jake West, director Mark Herman and historical consultant Dr. Jacqueline Riding, Puppeteer Marcus Clarke, directors John Hough, Waris Hussein and Michael Armstrong, actor Sir John Hurt, Monty Python’s Terry Jones, Brian Blessed and Paddy Considine.

https://derbyfilmfestival.co.uk/festival-history


In addition to that is QUAD’s Fright Club where a mix of brand new terrors from home and abroad are enjoyed alongside the pick of the archive classics. Every month, Cult Film Historian Darrell Buxton introduces some of the best horror films around for Midlands horror afficianados. Read more by clicking here.



There’s also 5 Lamps Film screenings which run every two months and showcase aspiring local filmmakers. As well as those regular events they also host their annual 24 hour film-making challenge at the end of the Derby Film Festival. It sees participants of any experience produce a short film of three minutes over the course of 24 hours before they are screened to the public with awards given to 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. Click here for more




There’s also the Summer Nights outdoor film calendar to thank QUAD for as well. Starting in Derby but now spreading to stately homes and grand venues throughout the UK, they have given the chance for audiences to enjoy the great outdoors for a unique cinematic experience. Read our thoughts on The Forces Awakens screening in the Midlands here.




And to celebrate the last 10 years, QUAD also has two exciting events coming up before the end of 2018.


First up is a free outdoor screening of ‘The Greatest Showman’ at Derby Market Place starting at 8:15pm on 26th September 2018 and will include subtitles for those who are D/deaf or hard of hearing. Attenders are advised to bring their own camping-style chairs to sit on!


If the outside isn’t your cup of tea, then QUAD’s “The Best of 10” ten-film season includes ten titles chosen from each year that the venue has been open and takes place between August and December 2018. Alongside the ten films, QUAD asked the public to vote for their favourite film shown at the venue, which will be shown as the final, eleventh choice.


But we haven’t even mentioned the film clubs, education and quiz nights so please go to https://www.derbyquad.co.uk to get involved in many more creative events.


So Happy Birthday QUAD! With a comprehensive cinematic schedule running throughout the year with events catering for all tastes, ages and backgrounds, we wish all the staff, crew, films and filmmakers all the best for another decade of fantastic film feasts.


Mike Sales



By midlandsmovies, Aug 25 2018 12:24PM



Fright Club in Derby screens cult classics in September


Fright Club is Derby QUAD's mix of brand new terrors from home and abroad and the pick of the archives which has a reputation of dragging audiences kicking and screaming towards the midnight hour!


Every month, Cult Film Historian Darrell Buxton introduces some of the best horror films around and in September they have a whole host of chillers coming to the cinemtaic screen.


Fright Club are screening (to much controversy it seems - see BBC coverage here) British horror classics Don't Look Now and The Wicker Man at Derby Cathedral on September 7th and 8th.


At QUAD, there are screenings of local horror comedy Crispy's Curse with a Q&A with director John Williams on September 28th.


And during the following month on October 11th, there will be a preview screening of British zombie epic Redcon-1 with a Q&A involving director Chee Keong Cheung, executive producer and actor Carlos Gallardo (El Mariachi, Desperado, Once Upon A Time in Mexico), and actor, producer and fight co-ordinator Mark Strange (Batman Begins).



For more information and to purchase tickets for each screening check out the links below:


Don't Look Now (15)

September 7th 2018

Derby Cathedral

Click here


The Wicker Man (15)

September 8th 2018

Derby Cathedral

Click here


Crispy's Curse (18)

September 28th

QUAD

Click here


Redcon-1 (18)

October 11th 2018

QUAD

Click here





By midlandsmovies, Aug 25 2018 08:59AM



Midlands Interview - Joe Roguszka


20th Century Tribe is an upcoming short film nostalgically looking at the 90s youth and rave culture in the UK and Midlands Movies Editor Mike Sales catches up with the progress of this exciting new Midlands film by speaking to the film's director Joe Roguszka.


Midlands Movies: Morning Joe. Can you tell our readers how your new film came about?

Joe Roguszka: I have fond memories of the 1990s from the perspective of a child. I feel it’s a time period that was vibrant and exciting atmospherically, stylistically and sociologically. For several years I have had a curious interest in the ‘90s rave scene, which has gradually grown over time until in the last twelve months it has become a fully-fledged obsession.


MM: And what inspired 20th Century Tribe?

JR: Well, I have an immense fascination and love for 90s rave music, the visual aesthetics, and for the feeling of non-judgemental unity that appears to have been significant in the ‘90s rave scene. As someone who loves to get lost in the trance of good techno music, loves to dance to that kind of music, I have a degree of admiration for the nightclub scene at that time, whereas to be brutally honest I feel that today’s nightclub scene is comparatively vapid and quite disappointing.


MM: And are you from the Midlands yourself?

JR: Yes. I was born in Derbyshire in the very early 1990s and have lived here my whole life. Since a very young age I have had a passionate love for cinema, for the amazing power it has to allow the viewer to temporarily escape their present situation, to become immersed in a world and a story completely separate from their own. Today I consider myself an avid lover of cinema, and an aspiring writer/director. I have a particularly keen interest in developing as a screenwriter and having recently graduated from Derby University with a degree in Film Production.


MM: What have the struggles of getting the production to completion so far?

JR: This is a challenging question, as the production has been so ambitious that there have been numerous difficulties. I think finding and securing suitable locations is always very challenging, and working at such a micro-budget level I have often had to make the best of locations with issues such as noise pollution or a likelihood of interference from members of the public. With this project being set in the 1990s as well, even some of the interior locations have been challenging. Usually interior locations allow more control, but we did have to be very eagle eyed for anything in the frame which was too new for the early 1990s period. Recruiting extras for the rave scenes was particularly difficult, especially considering the location was a drive away so we had to arrange transport as well. Securing permission to use licensed 1980s and 1990s rave music has been tremendously difficult. Ultimately however I think all these difficulties are the result of working with such a small budget, so as has always been the case with films I’ve worked on I believe the most difficult aspect has been securing financial backing and being able to work with the budget we have.



MM: So can you tell us a bit about the main characters?

JR: The protagonist is an eighteen-year-old girl named Heather, played by Becki Jones. She has just finished sixth form and is in a position of dilemma between rushing into university despite being unsure what she wants to do, or taking a gap year to learn more about herself and what she wants out of life. She’s quite a socially awkward person, and at the beginning of the film is still quite new to the rave scene, having only recently been befriended by the supporting characters. Katie is played by Charlotte King. She’s protective and sociable, having taken Heather under her wing so to speak and introduced her to the rave scene, simply due to an enthusiasm for meeting new people and making new friends. Dean Morris plays Hud, a boyish, high energy character who similar to Katie is very sociable and loves to make friends. Danny Patrick plays Brett, a morally ambiguous character whose energy is somewhat averse to that of the rave scene, in that he can be quite hostile to new people. Spence, played by Instinct Elkanah, is sort of Brett’s wingman although he’s much more good natured and is perhaps quite naive with regards to some of Brett’s concerning traits. Finally, Justine Moore plays Brett’s girlfriend Amber. She’s in a situation where she’s in a relationship with a guy who doesn’t treat her particularly well, but she stays with him due to low self-esteem and for the principle of being seen with an older guy.


MM: How did you come to cast the actors in these roles? What were you looking for?

JR: To be honest I did have a few actors in mind when I was writing the script, actors that I had worked with before who I felt worked well and that I felt I worked well with. There was one actor who I met by chance while I was writing the script, and I had an amazing experience where it felt like I had met my character, in that the actor was almost exactly as I had imagined the character from the way they spoke, to mannerisms, physical appearance and personality. I cast this actor in the proof of concept short which we shot in February/March, the idea being that this would serve as an audition for the role in the film itself. They were great in that, so I kept them in the role for the film. We held open auditions for all the other roles, and there were definitely cases where actors were not what I had initially envisioned when writing the role, but fit the role surprisingly well in the audition so that I was happy to cast them.


MM: And how much of your own experiences are in 20th Century Tribe?

JR: I had a sort of realisation at the beginning of this year, that certain characters I have written tend to be manifestations of different parts of myself. This is particularly true of the short film Collision that I wrote and directed last year and is too for 20th Century Tribe. In particular, I feel like the protagonist Heather is a manifestation of my shy, introvert self, and that Hud is a manifestation of my high energy, extrovert self which doesn’t come out very often. I think the place that Heather is in is a reflection of how I have felt for perhaps a few years now; unsure of what I’m really doing with my life, what I’m working towards, where I belong and with whom I belong, essentially looking for a sense of belonging. Meanwhile Hud is myself on the rare occasions that I’m carefree and comfortable in my surroundings. There are certain other characters where I’ve drawn influence from real people I have known, perhaps a little cheekily in some cases. Sometimes I make a point of remembering amazing dialogue, or incidents, that I witness or am a part of in real life, with the clear intention to use it in something I write. So there are moments in the film, whether dialogue or something else, which I have witnessed in real life.



MM: What are your favourite films?

JR: My favourite genres are actually dystopia and western, each of which I have a huge interest in and a huge appreciation for. Dystopia in particular I am kind of obsessed with so much that most of my written assessed work at university was on dystopian cinema. I like dystopias that explore the sociological consequences of disaster, or social or economic failure, The Warriors, A Clockwork Orange, Mad Max being my favourites, although I recently discovered and immensely loved the Aussie film Dead End Drive-In. I keep telling people about it hoping someone will watch it and love it as much as me


MM: Any music films?

JR: With regards to films about youth, music and partying, this is definitely another kind of film which I very much enjoy. I like ‘slice of life’ films that tell a relatively simple story, I find them very relatable and endearing. In particular I’m a big admirer of the works of Shane Meadows, particularly Dead Man’s Shoes and This Is England (film and tv). I think Rumble Fish, Dazed and Confused and American Honey are great films about youth culture, and I love the lesser known The Way Way Back. I also have a high opinion of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, which is my personal favourite of that particular breed of 1980s youth fiim. I do enjoy many films where a particular dance or music scene plays a significant part. One of my all time favourites is Boogie Nights, which I think is great fun, highly entertaining but also at times brutally real, ultimately evocative and endearing. Meanwhile I think British films like Spike Island, Northern Soul and of course Human Traffic are enjoyable explorations of their respective music scenes.


MM: What filmmakers inspire you and did that influence any creative decisions?

JR: I certainly think I’ve drawn influence from the works of Shane Meadows and from Andrea Arnold’s American Honey. I’m a big advocate of allowing actors a great deal of creative freedom. I encourage them to play around with dialogue and body language, as I want them to be able to feel very natural and very comfortable in their role. It’s very rare that I ask an actor to say something exactly as written in the script, as I feel allowing the actor such freedom encourages a more natural performance. I like the way Terrence Malick allows the audience a brief glimpse into characters’ thoughts using voice-over dialogue, which may have influenced some ideas I am playing around with regarding the rave scenes. One filmmaker whose work I find particularly inspires me to want to write and direct films is Stanley Kubrick. I find his films to be very immersive, psychologically fascinating, atmospherically enthralling and often visually stunning both in use of camera as well as costume and sets. I would love to create something as completely enthralling and unnerving as The Shining, a huge ambition I hope to work towards.


MM: So where and when can people see the finished film 20th Century Tribe?

JR: Well the film is currently in the first phase of editing. We have a small team of editors currently working on the rough cut, however they will be working on their degree alongside this so we don’t expect the edit to be finished until spring/summer 2019. We also have a few little scenes to film in September, so I’m currently working on preparing for that. The intention will be to enter the film into festivals, so where it will be shown is yet to be seen. From there it depends how the film does in the festival circuit really.


MM: And what’s next on the horizon for you?

JR: I will begin a masters in writing for the screen in September, so at the moment I do intend to work on my ability as a writer. I would like to write screenplays ideally for television and feature films, I currently have numerous ideas I’m working on so I’m really waiting to see which will emerge as my next project.


MM: And finally, do you have any advice for any local filmmakers looking to start their own project - either in front of or behind the camera?

JR: People who have their own equipment, particularly camera, sound and lighting, are essential. If you are a student in film or media and have access to equipment from the equipment centre, utilise it. Be prepared to spend your own money on your film, as you probably will have to, and if the budget is looking tight then only spend money where you absolutely need to. Many locations can be used for free or a very low price if you are honest, polite and friendly with location owners. Make a project that people want to be involved in, be sociable, friendly, enthusiastic and be confident about what you want to make. You have to have love and excitement for your project, otherwise no one else will.


Thank you Joe.


Find out more about 20th Century Tribe on their social media pages below:

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/20th_Tribe

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/20thCenturyTribe


By midlandsmovies, Jul 11 2018 02:00AM

Quite simply, here is our ongoing and updated list of Film Festivals in the Midlands (2018 edition):


• THE SHORT CINEMA http://www.theshortcinema.co.uk info@theshortcinema.co.uk Phoenix, Leicester - August 20 – 25, 2018


• NOTTINGHAM MICRO FILM FESTIVAL Twitter @FilmNottingham http://www.nimfestival.com/ 8-10 March 2018


• INDIE-LINCS - March 15-18 2018 Based at Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, and run in partnership with The School of Film and Media at the University of Lincoln http://www.indie-lincs.com


• BRINDLEY PLACE OUTDOOR FEST - http://www.brindleyplace.com/event/brindleyplace-film-festival-2018/ July 16 -22 2018


• LEICESTER DOCFILM FEST https://twitter.com/docfilmfestival Contact John Coster November 2018


• BORDERLINES FEST http://www.borderlinesfilmfestival.co.uk UK's largest rural film festival. Herefordshire/Shropshire - 23rd February - 11th March 2018


• BIRMINGHAM FILM FEST - November 22 – 25 2018 https://filmfreeway.com/festival/Birminghamfilmfestival


• BIFF FEST (Black International Film Fest) https://www.biffestival.co.uk 2018 dates TBC


• SHOCK AND GORE FESTIVAL http://www.shockandgore.co.uk The Electric Cinema in Birmingham, July. Contact david@theelectric.co.uk or https://twitter.com/shockgore July 27 to Aug 5 2018


• DEAFFEST http://www.deaffest.co.uk The UK's International Deaf Film & Arts Festival Wolverhampton. Contact info@light-house.co.uk Friday 17th to Sunday 19th May 2019


• THE UK ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL LEICESTER - http://tonguesonfire.com/ 15 March - 31 March 2018


• SHOUT FESTIVAL http://shoutfestival.co.uk Birmingham Dates TBC for 2018


• DERBY FILM FESTIVAL http://www.derbyfilmfestival.co.uk 4th - 13th MAY 2018


• FANTASTIQ FEST http://fantastiq.co.uk Fantasy/Horror Fest at Quad in Derby (part of Derby Film Fest)


• MAYHEM HORROR Film Fest - Halloween. Contact Broadway cinema in Nottingham http://www.broadway.org.uk/mayhem 11 October - 14 October 2018


• FLATPACK FEST - Birmingham, UK. http://www.flatpackfestival.org.uk 13 - 22 April 2018


• EAST ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL http://www.eastwindsfilmfest.com May 2018


• BEESTON FILM FESTIVAL - https://twitter.com/BeestonFilm 8th - 11th March 2018


• SHROPSHIRE RAINBOW FILM FESTIVAL http://www.rainbowfilmfestival.org.uk/midlands-zone 5th - 7th October 2018


• GRINDHOUSE PLANET - www.grindhouseplanet.com November 2018 TBC


* BOTTLESMOKE FILM FESTIVAL - https://www.facebook.com/BottleSmokeStoke Stoke on Trent, 8th - 9th September 2018


* POCKET FILM FESTIVAL (Unseen cinema) http://www.unseencinema.co.uk/pocket-film-festival-2018/ Stafford 12-17 March 2018


* BIRMINGHAM HORROR GROUP - https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/birmingham-horror-group-mini-movie-marathon-25-march-2018-tickets-41683231668 Mini-Movie Marathon Mini-Movie 25 March 2018


* SHROPSHIRE'S FIRST WORLD WAR FILM FESTIVAL https://twitter.com/wilfredowen100 8th October to 23rd November 2018


* THE BRAVE BLACK BIRD FILM FEST Wolverhampton https://ajayhackett2113.wixsite.com/bbff Wolverhampton 25th Feb 2019 (submissions until July 2018)


* HIGH PEAK INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL Derbyshire https://www.highpeakindie.com 12th to 16th June 2019. #HPIFF18


* NOTTINGHAM FILM FESTIVAL Hothouse Theatre Nottingham https://twitter.com/NottmFilmFest 8th July 2018


* THE VENUE LINCOLN FILM FESTIVAL Lincolnshire https://www.thevenuelincoln.co.uk 6th - 8th July 2018


* THE SHORT STACK FILM FESTIVAL Nottingham Bi-monthly screening night at Broadway Cinema https://www.facebook.com/groups/841340665914084 (Various dates)


* THE TELFORD FILM FESTIVAL Telford & Wrekin - various venues across Telford as part of the twon's 50th anniversary http://www.telford50.co.uk/filmfestival 14th September to 31st October 2018


Other useful Film Festival information can be find at these links:

http://www.festivalfocus.org/festival

http://film.britishcouncil.org/festivals-directory/festivals-map

http://www.thefilmfestivaldoctor.co.uk

By midlandsmovies, May 27 2018 09:44AM



Midlands Spotlight - Summer Nights Film 2018


Summer Nights festival as it is now in its eighth year and returns to its Midlands origins (as well as many more new venues throughout the country) with another spectacular line-up of outdoor cinema events in luxurious and fun locations in the region.

Highlights include a screening of IT (2017) at Calke Abbey on August 4th and Wollaton Hall on August 24th as well as Wayne’s World at Wollaton Hall on August 23rd. Party on!

Tickets can be purchased at the early bird price of £12.50 until the 1st June when they will increase to £15.50.


For the full line-up please see dates, films and venues below:


East Midlands


Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire – Fri 20th DUNKIRK & Sat 21st July MOULIN ROUGE


Bradgate Park, Leicester – new venue! Fri 20th THE GREATEST SHOWMAN & Sat 21st July DIRTY DANCING


Calke Abbey, Derbyshire – Thu 2nd PRETTY WOMAN & Fri 3rd THE GREATEST SHOWMAN & Sat 4th IT Sun 5th August THE GREATEST SHOWMAN


Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire – Fri 17th THE GREATEST SHOWMAN & Sat 18th August DIRTY DANCING


Wollaton Hall, Nottingham – Thu 23rd WAYNES WORLD Fri 24th IT Sat 25th THE GREATEST SHOWMAN Sun 26th THE DARK KNIGHT RISES - Mon 27th August BEAUTY & THE BEAST


Belton House, Lincolnshire – Fri 7th THE GREATEST SHOWMAN & Sat 8th September GHOSTBUSTERS



West Midlands:


Baddesley Clinton, Warwickshire – Thu 26th BEAUTY & THE BEAST Fri 27th TOP GUN & Sat 28th July FOOTLOOSE


Attingham Park, Shropshire – Fri 31st August DIRTY DANCING & Sat 1st September DUNKIRK


There are further dates and venues throughout England includng Surrey, Yorkshire and Cheshire


More information about these screenings and the festival can be found online here: www.summernightsfilm.co.uk





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