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By midlandsmovies, Aug 19 2018 03:05PM

Review - Movie Catch Up Blog 2018 - Part 2


Another selection of films from 2018 that we've caught up with later in the year!




Blockers (2018) Dir. Kay Cannon

A 90s style sex comedy which harks back to its closest cousin American Pie (1999) Blockers tells the story of three girls who make a pact to lose their virginity on prom night. With their protective parents discovering their saucy plans, they endeavour to prevent their offspring’s goals in a series of (“cock”) blocking moves. A directorial debut of some comedic flair, Blockers takes what could be a seedy premise and gives it a dash of heart which American comedies so much need to avoid the full-on gross-out humour and improv-style that has plagued the genre in the 2010s.


Starring Leslie Mann, Ike Barinholtz and John Cena – the ex-wrestler is surprisingly becoming one of my favourite American comedians and a far better actor than The Rock in my opinion – they are the trio of parents who try to stop their children Julie (Kathryn Newton), Sam (Gideon Adlon) and Kayla (Geraldine Viswanathan) from doing the dirty.


As well as the solid gags and situations, a splattering of deeper themes are sprinkled throughout including overprotective parents, blossoming sexuality and parental neglect during difficult teenage years. And whilst a couple of scenes seemed unnecessary – a rectum beer bong (!) is probably the worst offender – all 6 lead actors do well with the material as they give their characters heart and empathy. Blockers’ best aspect are the honest performances and tender moments however. Hardly breaking new ground, the film is a fun romp (pardon the pun) that takes its ideas seriously but with a winning formula of hilarity and honesty. 7/10



The Endless (2018) Dir. Justin Benson & Aaron Moorhead

With a draw dropping trailer, The Endless promised a dark drama with fantastic visuals as a strange, possibly apocalyptic, entity descends on a cult in the wilderness. Directors Benson and Moorhead also star as two brothers who return to a mysterious group of zealots they escaped from in their past. Struggling to move forward in their lives, the brothers have differing views of the cult and whilst their friends seem the same as many years ago, eerie events lead them to suspect there are still many unanswered questions.


The film sadly doesn’t live up to the trailer promise and opens poorly with an attempt to instil mystery falling flat with bland talking head interviews and a convoluted explanation of the events so far. Once the brothers arrive at the compound the film steps up a gear but spectacularly fails to provide any drama to keep the narrative pushing forward. With trees falling, a baseball apparently “floating” and a stranger repeatedly running there’s plenty of mysteries set up to explore but the Endless struggles to engage with rather dull characters and a narrative that, somewhat ironically, never gets going. As it proceeds I found my interest waning and with so little conflict or explanation, the worst state of all kicked in and I started not to care.


[Spoiler] The film’s one interesting concept is a reveal that this movie actually cross-overs with the directors’ previous film Resolution. If you are to watch the Endless then I highly recommend you catch that first. Aside from the surprise sequel concept (it’s no Split I assure you) there are some obvious circular comparisons in the visuals (a cup here, a ring fireplace there) which showed the inexperience of the directors with such weak parallels.


Whilst there were attempts to explore the truths behind the inexplicable events, I had sadly already lost interest by the final act. Comparisons to the TV show Lost were inevitable when rabbit hole story threads go down other rabbit holes, which, after a while, simply made no sense. In the end though, a great set of ideas and some admirable rich themes are completely undercut by a stale and moribund narrative and bland characters. A real missed opportunity that endlessly disappoints. 6/10



Ghost Stories (2018) Dir. Andy Nyman & Jeremy Dyson

A horror anthology with echoes of Jacob’s Ladder, Ghost Story also has a splattering of dark comedy by co-writer and co-director Jeremy Dyson from the legendary League of Gentlemen. Fellow writer-director Andy Nyman also stars as the film’s lead as a presenter who debunks psychics, but is then sent to investigate three mysterious tales by the famous 1970s supernatural sceptic who inspired him. First up is a ghostly fable involving a night watchman haunted by his daughter’s spirit, then a teenager spooked by a malevolent being in the woods and we end with a poltergeist encounter with a new-born.


The tales work well as short shockers but the film couldn’t quite work the balance of humour and horror. The appearance of comedic talents Martin Freeman and the Fast Show’s Paul Whitehouse meant the tales weren’t as terrifying as they needed to be. With a conclusion that felt more cop-out than revelatory, the whole production is well meaning but a bit meandering. Ghost Stories may supply a few charms for fans of retro UK Hammer horror but for me it would have suited TV far more than the cinema. A story of missed opportunities. 6/10


Mike Sales



By midlandsmovies, Aug 19 2018 06:38AM



Midlands Spotlight - Korky Films and JAM-AV present Dumped


Midlands Movies Mike discovers more about forthcoming new film Dumped from Lee Charlish and his Korky Films production company.


West Midlands filmmakers, and Midlands Movies Award winner, Korky Films have joined with JAM-AV to announce their second collaboration with a new comedy short film called Dumped.


The short is currently in pre-production and has cast the two main actors, Marian Elizabeth and Stuart Walker, who will be joined by a strong, experienced crew.


Marian Elizabeth has a wealth of experience in both feature films, shorts, TV and theatre and has been working in the industry since 2004. She has recently finished a horror feature for Mangled Media called We Wait in the Woods as well as feature film Blood and Bones (2016) and as Becky in When Quips Go Wrong.




Stuart Walker has a solid background in comedy with a long-list of credits in film, both feature and shorts, TV, radio and theatre, as well as commercials.




Jay Langdell of JAM-AV Media Production is lined up as Director of Photography and he will be assisted by Damien Trent of Doktored Films.


And last but not least the production has secured high-profile musician Chris Pemberton who is currently on tour with James Blunt, to provide the musical score.


Dumped is written by Lee Charlish of Korky Films who will also produce and direct the movie, which is expected to run for approximately 8 minutes.


Based on an uncompromising true story, the short will have some unique visuals and will hopefully have audiences cringing and laughing. Dumped will reveal a young couple called Steve and Kelly who in the early stages of courtship decide to spend their first night together.


The following morning, content and happy, the couple share breakfast before Steve leaves for work and whilst Kelly tells her friend all about the previous night and blossoming romance, she has an urgent need to use the toilet.


Unfortunately for her , things take an awkward turn and Kelly is presented with a problem which could ultimately lead to love ending before it’s begun.


With the movie hopefully shooting in October find out more information about Korky Films and the ongoing production of Dumpred at the following links:


Twitter - @korkyfilms

Instagram - @korkyfilms

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/korkyfilms


By midlandsmovies, Jul 15 2018 06:29PM



Gringo (2018) Dir. Nash Edgerton


After businessman Harold Soyinka (David Oyelowo) phones his head office bosses (Joel Edgerton as the obnoxious Richard and Charlize Theron as the unpleasant but seductive Elaine) to explain he has been kidnapped, Gringo kicks off an international farce of blue-collar crime, gangsters and hostage taking in this film from debut director Nash Edgerton.


With Harold’s lack of money, a wife seeking love elsewhere and his boss’ secret plans to let him go owing to a very shady company merger, he takes it upon himself to use a meeting in Mexico to collect a ransom on himself. When a drug cartel gets involved, the tables are spun and as Harold gets unwittingly involved in a case of mistaken identity, a mercenary played by a theatrical Sharlto Copley (doing what he does best) is dispatched to clear up the mess.


The film’s criss-crossing narrative is at first its triumph but then sadly its downfall however. What starts as a fun farce of down-at-luck mockery and silly, but passable, characters soon descends into a complicated commotion where misunderstanding is replaced with daft coincidences and broad caricatures.


I could however watch Theron’s callous and ruthless Elaine until the end of time with her dry wit and appalling yet hilarious behaviour. But the one-note idea of a put-upon office worker getting his own back on his bosses becomes increasingly muddled with so-so dialogue, too few belly laughs and a story that spirals into slapstick mayhem.


With a better script, some cinematic flair and subtler approach I could see the outline of the plot making a very good Coen brothers film (The Big Lebowski/Hail Caesar aren’t a million miles away anyways) but Gringo has more in common with a very average 1980s comedy flick.


Kudos goes to everyone giving it their all but aside from one or two clever jokes and Edgerton and Theron wallowing in their impressive ‘horrible bosses’ roles, the film is run-of-the-mill entertainment at best.


6.5/10


Midlands Movies Mike

By midlandsmovies, Jun 25 2018 10:06AM



Game Night (2018) Dir. John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein


Game Night is a refreshing American comedy film which stars Jason Bateman and Rachel McAdams as couple Max and Annie who after meeting during a bar trivia night, get married and run regular game nights at home with their suburban friends.


When Max’s more successful brother Brooks (Super 8 and King Kong’s Kyle Chandler) shows up unexpectedly one evening, he invites his sibling and his fellow players to join in an elaborate murder mystery evening.


However, unknowingly to the participants, Brooks’ dodgy past catches up with him and the evening turns into an actual kidnapping as Brooks is taken by the real criminals he has crossed. Game Night has a simple set up but what is refreshing is the lack of improvisation sequences. I am personally sick to death of the Will Ferrell and Seth Rogen's “stumbling” and “shouting” style and on-the-spot quips. That particular shtick can only be edited and shot one way but the directors clearly have a well-written script to work from. This also leads them to more bold directorial choices.


The movie looks like a film (rather than the flat TV-style of a lot of American comedies) and has more in common with Edgar Wright’s frenetic approach than, say, Judd Apatow. Again, the use of scripted dialogue allows for many more clever jokes, set-ups and pay-offs.


The film’s support cast is equally appealing with Billy Magnussen, Sharon Horgan, Lamorne Morris and Kylie Bunbury all playing interesting roles as the couple's friends whilst Jesse Plemons’ police officer is a fantastic performance of a quizzical and creepy next door neighbour.


As the various teams split up and follow fake clues to identify the real location of the kidnapping, the film is actually not too dissimilar to Keanu (2016) where suburbanites get caught up with criminals for one crazy night. Like that film, the script helps allow more film-making creativity as we later get strangely artistic tilt shift shots and an impressive one-take Faberge egg throwing sequence – which gets tossed around a mansion like the pig-skin of a Super Bowl.


But it’s not all trivial filmmaking pursuits, the jokes fly thick and fast with inventive sequences such as McAdams trying to remove a bullet from her husband’s arm as she follows medical instructions from a militia website on her phone. A dog toy in his mouth and some gruesome effects meant the movie began winning me over with its black comedy charms.


Coming in with very low expectations it has to be said, Game Night may have garnered a few extra points for its surprising movie-making skill but I was pleasantly surprised by actors I previously don’t much care for. And the car chases, fights and witty dialogue had the feel of classic 80s comedies like Beverly Hills Cop and Lethal Weapon. A compendium of clever scenes and sequences therefore sees Game Night as a fun and entertaining ride that has winning elements throughout.


7.5/10


Midlands Movies Mike


By midlandsmovies, May 25 2018 08:03AM



Derby Film Festival 2018


Midlands Movies writer Guy Russell takes a look at one of the premiere film festivals in the region as he checks out the best of the fest!


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Now in its 5th year, Derby Film Festival is showing no signs of slowing down. Last week I had the pleasure of attending the festival again hosted by QUAD, this year it kicked off on the 4th May followed by ten days of screenings, talks, short films and competitions.


Similar to last year’s sub-festival Fantastiq, the first four days of the festival were dedicated to Paracinema, a celebration of films and genres outside the mainstream including new releases and cult classics. Here are a few of new and cult classics screened during the festival:


Attack of the Adult Babies



Amongst the various films shown during the Paracinema arm of the festival was Attack of the Adult Babies, the latest offering from filmmaker Dominic Brunt. Brunt has built up quite the resume in recent years, his great work within the horror genre alone has gained him the reputation as a director you should definitely look out for when any of his projects hit the shelves.


An ordinary family are forced to break into a country manor to steal top secret information, what they find however are powerful, obese, middle aged men dressed in nappies being tendered to and waited upon by overly sexualised nurses in PVC uniforms. This is not your typical horror film!


The humour comes as quick and thick as the gore which will please both horror and comedy fans. Lines such as “We’re gonna need a bigger nappy” and “I’m going to cut you worse than a state pension” prove how much of an aware, modern film Attack of the Adult Babies is.


Shot on location at Broughton Hall in West Yorkshire, Attack of the Adult Babies joins Brunt’s CV of making socially aware Northern genre films, something not many can boast of. Since the release of The Purge series and last year’s Get Out there has been a revived interest in social-political horror films and after having watched this film I’m of the opinion this deserves a place in the conversation too.


Beneath the absurdity and the gore is an expose of how lazy powerful and greedy men can become, their reliance on others to wash, clean and cook for them here is shown by a regression to infancy.


If you’re after a horror-comedy film with gore and gags in equal measure, then check out this bonkers and brilliant effort. Attack of the Adult Babies is destined to be a cult British film, whether it be this decade or the next.


Attack of the Adult Babies is out on Blu-Ray and DVD on June 11th.


Charismata



Again as part of the Paracinema part of the festival is Charismata, a psychological horror from filmmaking duo Andy Collier and Toor Mian.


Rebecca Faraway (Sarah Beck Mather) is a murder detective working on a series of gruesome killings. As she becomes more involved with the investigation she begins to experience haunting visions which lead her to question her own sanity and state of mind.


I normally enter any independent horror production with an open mind, some can be quite hokey whilst others can surprise you with what they can do with so little. Luckily Charismata falls within the latter category, the cinematography by Fernando Ruiz and the score by Chris Roe give the film a polished and carefully constructed vibe, almost as if millions were spent in producing the picture.


Similar to Attack of the Adult Babies, Charismata feels very socially aware, whether intentional or not. Rebecca lives in a very masculine environment and is constantly under siege with sexist comments and a chauvinistic attitude towards her career as she is the only female on her team.


Acting isn’t usually lauded within the genre however Sarah Beck Mather as Rebecca was sensational. An intriguing portrayal, Mather plays Rebecca as quite a cold person however the character feels pretty well balanced considering the enormous pressure she endures throughout the film.


Whilst the “gore” level is by no means ignored, it is the carefully planned build-up of tension that brings the chills to the audience. I’m unsure when this will be screened again or released widely on home media however I urge any horror fan to seek this one out as Charismata was one of the best surprises of this year’s festival.


Escape from New York



Whilst the festival primarily celebrates fresh talent and brilliant new films, there is always space in the schedule to revel in classic films from yesteryear. This year, the one to catch for me was John Carpenter's science-fiction flick Escape from New York, a quintessential 80’s actioner starring Kurt Russell.


1997, Manhattan, New York has been abandoned and transformed into the perfect maximum security prison but unfortunately, whilst routinely flying over, Air Force One crashes onto the island leaving the President of the United States alive albeit in grave danger from unpredictable and dangerous inmates.


A deal is struck between the Warden and convicted bank robber Snake Plissken (Kurt Russell), to save the president and he will have earned his right to freedom.


Having only seen this film once before it was great to revisit this on the big screen. On the surface you might mistake this as a simple film but a great escapist movie, however knowing Carpenter's work and his love for using genre movies to explore certain themes you can see why critics are of the opinion that Escape from New York uses its dystopic environment to explore class and race issues.


Last year I caught the screening of Billy Wilder’s Ace in the Hole, a film I had never heard of until I watched it. It is now one of my favourite films of its period. I hope this Escape from New York showing had the same effect on someone and long may the festival continue presenting classics.


Overall it has been another successful year for the Derby Film Festival and QUAD as they continue to show a vast range of films across all genres, languages and budgets. I can’t wait to see what the 6th Annual Derby Film Festival holds in 2019. See you there.


Thanks to Peter Munford & Kathy Frain


Guy Russell


Twitter @BudGuyer


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Take a read of Guy's thoughts of the 2018 Derby Film Festival's other events including local documentary Spondon: Portrait of a Village and Five Lamps 24 hour Film Challenge



By midlandsmovies, May 23 2018 06:58PM



Downsizing (2018) Dir. Alexander Payne


This high-concept sci-fi drama seems to live in the same strange world as Ricky Gervais’ The Invention of Lying. By that, it’s set in a normal world yet with one very odd conceit – in this film it’s the ability to shrink people.


Yes, that's right, just like Honey I Shrunk the Kids! Unfortunately, like Gervais’ “clever” attempt, Downsizing’s tone is all over the place and the director appears to be delivering a sermon on poverty issues when the set-up is pure Ben Stiller territory.


The film was a box office bomb and it’s easy to see why. Story-wise, the earth’s resources are becoming increasingly limited and a scientist discovers a way of shrinking humans in order to make the most of what is left. People who go ahead with the procedure end up increasing the value of their money, so one particular couple, Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig, decide to take the plunge. However, she drops out at the last minute and we see Damon reflecting on his ‘big’ decision on his own.


Here we get the first mismatch as the film jumps from sequence to sequence in scenes that are a total tonal mismatch. These range from set-ups that play out like Willy Wonka’s Mike TV to a story that unfolds amongst poverty and health issues. Matt Damon (as always) is the likeable everyman whilst Jason Sudeikis (as always) is the self-centred “friend” and before long we find that the gap between rich and poor still exist as Damon visits impoverished slums.


Hong Chau plays a Vietnamese political prisoner who is shrunk against her will and does well with the awkward tone. Yet she is so wasted in the film in many respects. Damon’s unhappy American is far less interesting than Chau’s activist whose background sounds so much more intriguing.


As the film begins to explore themes of environmentalism through gorgeous shots of Norway, the film’s lightweight tone gives way to headier concepts and is all the worse because of it.


An incredibly strange film, almost nothing in Downsizing works together but individual scenes highlight the story that could/should have been told. Neither funny or satirical enough, it takes itself far too seriously and ends up being an honourable curio at best.


5.5/10


Midlands Movies Mike


By midlandsmovies, May 12 2018 08:10AM



Killing Gunther (2017) Dir. Taran Killam


Directed by funny-man Taran Killam, this new “comedy” stars Arnold Schwarzenegger who plays the world’s best hit man and the attempts by a group of assassins to try and get rid of the legendary killer.


The film is shot in a documentary/hand-held style and begins by introducing us to the contract killers explaining their background and relationship to Gunther as they join forces in their plans to kill him.


The documentary makers are there as proof they complete the job – thus also getting around the old question of “who is filming this” of such films. The hand-held nature seems a choice of low budget – no doubt a lot went to afford Arnie himself – but don’t be fooled by his appearance at the centre of the film’s poster. He actually arrives in the final 20 minutes!


The Gunther character DOES appear before then, as a thorn in the group’s side, but he is consistently covered in a trench coat, shown in blurred whip pans or merely talked about off-screen. In fact, it’s a bit of a hood-wink and without the draw of Arnie, the unfunny cast and low production values often fail to deliver anything of interest at all.


As they hunt Gunther, they become stalked themselves yet other than a few well-edited action sequences (clearly CGI enhanced) the movie’s puerile humour and OTT performances have all the charm, and value, of a Saturday Night Live sketch. And one that certainly didn’t need to be beyond the 10 minute length.


The film’s few positives nearly all occur when Arnie arrives as he pantomimes his way through a silly character in a ridiculous performance that is sorely missed from the rest of the film. Don’t be fooled by the marketing, this isn’t Arnie’s film at all, and in the end this awful comedy experiment will make you feel disappointed if not a little cheated.


4.5/10


Midlands Movies Mike

By midlandsmovies, May 8 2018 07:50PM



Knots Untie (2018)


Directed by A-jay Hackett


Writer and director Ajay Hackett’s latest short film is something reminiscent of her childhood. Knots Untie is based around her relationship with her dad when she was little, and ultimately the film consists of some really touching moments as a result.


What I liked about the film is that it had the ability to take the viewer back to when they were a little kid.


There was one shot of our young widower David Stallard and his daughter Harriet Ling reading the day’s papers and that reminded me so much of how I used to copy my grandad when I was little. To be able to take a person back to moments like that is a majorly powerful quality for any film to have, but I have noticed that short films such as this one do very well when they include such scenes.


I think it’s because the films need to compensate for not having the freedom to tell a three hour long saga, because generally speaking, without a decent story to get your teeth into, it can sometimes be difficult to get fully into what you’re watching. By adding these personal touches that connect so strongly with viewers, you can avoid the need for a Lord Of The Rings scale story because you’ve reminded them of something that ultimately keeps their attention focused on the film.


I also thought it was nice that straightaway the film blows out of the water all ideas you might have about what exactly the story is going to be about. The title, along with the opening shot of a sympathy card with a photograph in the background points towards something that potentially could be quite a bleak tale.


However, what we actually get to witness is something quite the opposite. Whilst it’s easy to look at this film and think that it’s about the memories a father has of his daughter when she was growing up, it can also be taken that there is some sort of deeper meaning that we should spend more time being thankful for what we have as opposed to dwelling on what we don’t, which is what I found the contrast between the opening shot and the rest of the film to be very symbolic of.


In terms of how the film was put together, I liked the hazy glow that was given to the times being looked back on. When compared to the present day shots, it was clear that those memories were happy ones because of the editing that had taken place there. It’s something that I’ve seen on a few occasions and I think it’s something that always works well when used in the right way, which was very much the case here.


If you’re looking for a film to take you back to when you were younger, remind you of times gone by, then you could do worse than Knots Untie. Hackett’s story here is one that is clearly deeply personal to her, but it’s one that has a lot of touches that have the potential to reach out to anyone who takes the time out of their day to watch it, which is where I believe it’s greatest strengths lie.

Kira Comerford


Twitter @FilmAndTV101


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