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By midlandsmovies, Apr 3 2019 11:31AM



THE POPULAR ‘BEWARE THE MOON’ SCREENINGS RETURN TO DUDLEY CASTLE THIS SUMMER


Dudley Zoological Gardens are again teaming up with Flatpack Projects to present the cinema spectacular BEWARE THE MOON.


Dudley Castle will once again be transformed into a vast open-air cinema for two consecutive nights – Tim Burton’s afterlife comedy BEETLEJUICE will screen on Friday 2nd August, followed by the supernatural cult classic THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT on Saturday 3rd August 2019.


Previous Flatpack events have included spectacular outdoor screenings of NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, THE LOST BOYS, THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN and AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON in the stunning castle courtyard. Guests at BEWARE THE MOON can enjoy hot food, a licensed bar, DJs and spine-chilling special effects projected onto the historic castle ramparts – with a very spooky surprise or two thrown in for good measure!


BEWARE THE MOON: BEETLEJUICE (15)

Friday 2nd August 2019, doors open at 7pm

Castle Hill, Dudley, West Midlands, DY1 4QF

Tickets: £12 (concs £10), Double Bill Ticket: £20

Book via https://www.dudleyzoo.org.uk/beetlejuice/


BEWARE THE MOON: THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (15)

Saturday 3rd August 2019, doors open at 7pm

Castle Hill, Dudley, West Midlands, DY1 4QF

Tickets: £12 (concs £10), Double Bill Ticket: £20

Book via https://www.dudleyzoo.org.uk/blair-witch/


Dudley Castle will also be hosting some additional outdoor screenings in May – the foot-stomping celebration of Queen BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY (Friday 17th May 2019) and the classic love story DIRTY DANCING (Saturday 18th May 2019).


Some FAQs are below:


How do I gain access to the event?

Entrance to the event will be via the Fellows Pub car park, No 1 The Broadway, Dudley, DY1 4QB, from 7pm. Last admission on site will be 9.15pm.


Where can I park?

Please note parking is not available either at the Castle or on The Fellows pub car park for this event. Please park on the main Zoo car park (situated off the Tipton Road, DY1 4SQ) which will be open from 6.30pm. Car parking is included in your event cost. Please note the car park is an approximate 15 minute walk away from the event. Please advise staff in advance of any access needs and we can plan an alternative route. Please note this car park will close at 11.30 pm.


How do I get there via public transport?

Dudley Bus Station is 2 minutes walk from the entrance via Fellows Pub car park.

Rail: Dudley Port Station 3 miles / Sandwell & Dudley Station 5 miles. Frequent bus service to Dudley from Dudley Port station.


What should I bring with me?

Please bring your booking confirmation ticket with you on the evening for admission purposes. This can be shown on your mobile phone. All guests listed on your ticket must arrive together. All concessionary ticket holders will also need to present proof of concession status. We advise guests to bring a torch with them as areas of the Zoo can be a little dark when you leave. We also advise sensible footwear to be worn and suitable clothing for the weather. Seating will not be provided so please bring picnic blankets and/or camping chairs. Tents are not allowed.


What time does it start?

Doors open at 7pm and we kick off with a DJ, followed by shorts at 9pm and the main feature at 9.30pm.


What time does it finish?

The event is expected to finish around 11pm and guests should also exit the site via the green gates on the Fellows Pub car park.


What happens if it rains?

The event will go ahead whatever the weather. TICKETS ARE NON-REFUNDABLE & NON-EXCHANGEABLE.


Will there be food and drink available to buy?

Refreshments will be available to purchase during the evening from the Courtyard café and inside the Castle Grounds. You are welcome to bring your own picnics too.


Are pets allowed?

Only assistance animals are allowed access to the site.


Is it suitable for children?

The film is rated 15. All children under the age of 16 yrs must be accompanied by an adult.


Can I smoke at the event?

Smoking is permitted in the designated smoking area by the Courtyard café.




By midlandsmovies, Oct 25 2018 02:43PM



Bohemian Rhapsody (2018) Dir. Bryan Singer


Let’s get the Queen song puns out of the way from the start. Is Bohemian Rhapsody “guaranteed to blow your mind”? Well, it’s a glossy, Queen-approved biopic that had some tremendous moments but unfortunately the sum is less than its parts as we follow the glam-infused rock-opera band from their early beginnings to their Live Aid performance of 1985.


We open backstage at that world-broadcast concert but are soon thrust back in time to 1970 where flamboyant singer Farrokh Bulsara (soon to be Freddie Mercury) meets up with Gwilym Lee as Brian May and Ben Hardy as Roger Taylor after their band ‘Smile’ loses their frontman.


Mercury is encapsulated, and then some, by a beyond-terrific performance from Rami Malek and although the film covers various aspects of the band’s career, Malek is thrust centre stage and like Freddie, all eyes are on him throughout the duration.


After securing bassist John Deacon the film stops off at varying points of the group’s milestones as we get to see the greatest hits of Mercury's life from his Zanzibar roots, Bombay originating parents, his meeting and engagement to lifelong companion Mary Austin, the band on tour and the subsequent falling outs.


Fun and harmless it is but sometimes borders on the bland with shot choices that were less than cinematic. This lack of consistency may have come from the removal of the film’s original director Bryan Singer. The irony of behind-the-scenes (or backstage if you will) creative differences isn’t lost on this reviewer.


Also losing a singer are Queen. The film sees Freddie’s ego get the better of him as his wild lifestyle lead him to a drug and sex-fuelled hedonism which culminates in him pursuing solo project without his band mates. Or his “family” as they are repeatedly referred to.


As a 12A film, the movie doesn’t go into Mercury’s debauched depths (Movie Marker’s Darryl Griffiths sums up the issue brilliantly here) and although it’s not a warts and all exploration, the film doesn’t shy from his sexuality and his subsequent discovery that he contracted AIDS.


The film therefore feels like its trying to cover far too much ground (around 15 years) and doesn’t give adequate space for all its plot and character ambitions. The wayward frontman scenes combine nicely with the studio sequences however. The repetition of Roger Taylor’s falsetto delivery of “Galileo” is a great nod to the band’s recording methods as seen on BBC2s’ “Making Of” documentary where hundreds of takes were attempted to achieve Freddie’s legendary perfectionism.


It gave the impression at times that the film (produced and approved by May and Taylor) was also attempting to force their contributions in which made it feel a bit "try-hard". The whole band were brilliant of course and each member essential but it was definitely the Freddie show that made the best cinema here.


And although a cameo from Mike Myers was a nice nod to the song’s influence, like far too much of the script, he delivers lines from Anthony McCarten's screenplay that are simply too on the nose. "We get it. It’s Wayne’s World! You don’t need to say it!"


One of the most talked-about, and lauded, scenes is the recreation of the band’s Live Aid show at Wembley Stadium. A fantastic realisation of the day, it is somewhat spoiled by a Return of the King (or should that be Queen) style ending that felt like it went on for days. Rami struts the stage in a way that is less than just a good impression and more of a total embodiment but after 15 minutes the film easily could have wrapped itself up after the first track.


As a huge fan of the band I enjoyed Bohemian Rhapsody but it's all a bit like Queen themselves – slightly indulgent, sometimes overlong and contains an unhealthy obsession with its own importance BUUUUUT you can't take your eyes off that man at the front. And Rami Malek is without doubt stunning as Freddie Mercury.


A shed-load of hits from Queen’s back catalogue are obviously interspersed throughout and the most moving moment was Malek’s delivery as he reveals his AIDS diagnosis to his weeping band mates. A heart-breaking and jolting sequence in a film that had been mostly surface throughout.


But I couldn’t dislike the film for its broad strokes. It aimed high and unfortunately fell a little flat yet I enjoyed much of the film’s approach, its likeable depictions of the band (and their hangers-on) as well as the shooting star of the show that is Rami Malek.


Broken into three parts – the film shows Freddie’s killing of his past persona growing up, then the campy frolics and hedonism of operatic orgies and a final head-banging ending with pulsating riffs and joyous rock – if only there was a Queen song that encapsulated all this.


8/10


Mike Sales


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