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Review - The Mummy

By midlandsmovies, Jul 9 2017 09:15AM



The Mummy (2017) Dir. Alex Kurtzman


Oh Tom Cruise what have ye done?


Tom Cruise is one of those actors who fully deserves the title “icon”, “film star”. He has tackled every genre and worked with the greats. I mean who can boast working with Scorsese, Spielberg, Kubrick, Coppola, Stone, De Palma, Mann, Woo, Ridley and Tony Scott to name a few? He’s managed to stay on top of his game through four decades, reinventing himself time and time again.


But is this the end? If The Mummy is a taste of what we can expect from now on, then this could be the first nail in Cruise’s coffin?


Firstly, clear you mind. Clear your mind of any previous assumption this will film will be similar to the old 30’s Mummy film’s or Brendan Fraser’s Mummy trilogy of 99-08. Doing so will give you a better chance of enjoying this picture…maybe. I went expecting a fresh take on an old story, and that is on offer here, it’s just a shame the film is so poorly made narratively speaking.


The story begins with during the Middle Ages, as English crusaders capture a large stone from Egypt and entomb it within the coffin of a departed crusader knight. The rare stone coupled with a special dagger can grant whoever wields it the power to transfer spirits into an animated form.


In another flashback, in Ancient Egypt, Princess Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella) has just been informed that her new born baby brother will be the new heir to the throne as he is male. Scorned by this she sells her soul to the Egyptian god of Evil, Set, who presents her with a dagger to kill her family which can also be used to transfer his spirit into human form.


Ahmanet fails however and is buried alive deep underground inside a sarcophagus. Unknowingly U.S soldier and treasure hunter Nick Morton (Tom Cruise) stumbles upon her tomb. Freeing the sarcophagus for financial gain Nick and his military superiors place her in transport to London.

Free from the steel chains and mercury imprisoning her, Princess Ahmanet takes over the plane transporting her, crashing and killing nearly everyone on board. Nick awakes from the crash, confused and disorientated, he is told Ahmanet has chosen him as a vessel for Set and is now cursed for eternity. Roaming around free in present day London, Princess Ahmanet regains human form, chasing the stone and dagger she needs to resurrect Set.


It’s difficult to understand how director Alex Kurtzman has managed to make a story which could be so simple into such a convoluted mess. The Mummy throughout its 110-minute run time has no patience, it never seems to slow down enough for characters to develop or for the viewer to catch up with the unnecessarily complex narrative. This is the films biggest problem, what should have been a brisk, enjoyable adventure film has been worn down to a gloomy, careless, mess.


Leaving the film, I realised I didn’t know anything about Nick nor cared what happened to him, he’s a character that moves the plot from A to B. Nick’s love interest Jenny (Annabelle Wallis) the viewer cares even less about, she is given no development and comes across as bland and unforgettable.


With War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) just on the horizon we know that good CGI is attainable for modern Hollywood blockbusters which frustrates me when you see the awful effects on show here. This is genuinely one of the worst examples of bad CGI I’ve seen in recent years.


Releasing The Mummy, Universal Studios are trying to capitalise on the current trend for films to share

a universe instead of standing alone, in this case the universe being the Dark Universe, which will consist of films based on the classic monster movies of the 1930s. Whilst I’m no expert or super fan of Marvel they have done a stellar job in achieving this, working hard over the last decade ensuring the films that make up for universe are solid feature films that can be watched as a singular film and still be enjoyable. Universal seem to be desperate to replicate their success but not willing to spend the time ensuring the movies they’re producing under the Dark Universe banner to be well made.


Overall The Mummy surprises me. Tom Cruise is known to have such a powerful creative input during production that his films are made to an extremely high standard which isn’t the case here. A bigger shame is that the opening half hour impressed me, the scenes in Iraq are creepy and exhilarating; the fire-fight on the rooftop being a good action set piece. Also the cinematography by Ben Seresin, known for his work on World War Z, is fantastic but wasted in parts by the rushed editing.


Tom Cruise is back in cinemas this September with American Made (2017) which sees him team with up Edge of Tomorrow (2014) director Doug Liman so here’s hoping Cruise can get back to his best!


4/10


Guy Russell

https://twitter.com/BudGuyer

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