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Review - The Beatles - Eight Days A Week

By midlandsmovies, Oct 10 2016 02:14PM

The Beatles: Eight Days A Week (2016) Dir. Ron Howard


Don’t let me down. The Beatles were at the height of their popularity in the mid-60s when they left their touring days behind them despite the fact they were filling out venues worldwide. This new documentary from Ron Howard tries to explain those heady days on the road before their live retirement with songs, gossip and historical footage.


The film begins with the band honing their talents during intensive 12 hour gigs in Hamburg before the recruitment of Ringo Starr and their rise to stardom via The Cavern in Liverpool. Already a tight-knit band by their early 20s, they embarked on endless UK tours as they began their first record releases beginning with Please Please Me in 1962. With manager Brian Epstein keen to keep them in the public’s eye, a single was demanded every few months and live gigs were very much part of the promotional (mystery) tour.


The documentary uses archive tapes along with some longer sequences of full songs to show the talent the band had from the very beginning. Their story continues as they break America on the Ed Sullivan show which turns them into a worldwide phenomenon with shows soon spread all over the globe.


The problem with the film – and this falls squarely on my shoulders as a HUGE Beatles fan – is that the stories and material are so well known to aficionados that there was very little new to learn here. I literally found myself mouthing along not only to the lyrics but to the stories including Harrison’s tale of Lennon’s “To the toppermost of the poppermost, Johnny” mantra.


Being the biggest band the world has ever seen has meant the tour tales have been told and re-told time again, not least in The Beatles’ very own Anthology – a documentary so in depth that nothing really comes close.


What I hadn’t seen before – and by default was the best part for me – was some of the archive concert footage showing the brilliant live performing skills of the mop-tops. Sounding uncannily like their recordings, their competency and delivery is so good and represents hours of toil on the road and on the stage. The footage also shows how small-time venues led to larger shows in auditoriums before the infamous Shea Stadium gig in New York which was their unknowing and penultimate swan song.


The footage also shows how the live shows became little more than crowd noise and screaming as well as their studio experimentation becoming increasingly difficult to capture on the live circuit.


In conclusion, the documentary is solid with good interviews, stories and structure and it covers an important part of the life of the greatest band there’s ever been. However, avid Beatles fans looking for exclusive tales will be disappointed by the lack of any new information with only the rare concert performances being truly dazzling. I’m really down.


7/10


Midlands Movies Mike

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