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Review - Movie Catch Up Blog 2018 - Part 2

By midlandsmovies, Aug 19 2018 03:05PM

Review - Movie Catch Up Blog 2018 - Part 2


Another selection of films from 2018 that we've caught up with later in the year!




Blockers (2018) Dir. Kay Cannon

A 90s style sex comedy which harks back to its closest cousin American Pie (1999) Blockers tells the story of three girls who make a pact to lose their virginity on prom night. With their protective parents discovering their saucy plans, they endeavour to prevent their offspring’s goals in a series of (“cock”) blocking moves. A directorial debut of some comedic flair, Blockers takes what could be a seedy premise and gives it a dash of heart which American comedies so much need to avoid the full-on gross-out humour and improv-style that has plagued the genre in the 2010s.


Starring Leslie Mann, Ike Barinholtz and John Cena – the ex-wrestler is surprisingly becoming one of my favourite American comedians and a far better actor than The Rock in my opinion – they are the trio of parents who try to stop their children Julie (Kathryn Newton), Sam (Gideon Adlon) and Kayla (Geraldine Viswanathan) from doing the dirty.


As well as the solid gags and situations, a splattering of deeper themes are sprinkled throughout including overprotective parents, blossoming sexuality and parental neglect during difficult teenage years. And whilst a couple of scenes seemed unnecessary – a rectum beer bong (!) is probably the worst offender – all 6 lead actors do well with the material as they give their characters heart and empathy. Blockers’ best aspect are the honest performances and tender moments however. Hardly breaking new ground, the film is a fun romp (pardon the pun) that takes its ideas seriously but with a winning formula of hilarity and honesty. 7/10



The Endless (2018) Dir. Justin Benson & Aaron Moorhead

With a draw dropping trailer, The Endless promised a dark drama with fantastic visuals as a strange, possibly apocalyptic, entity descends on a cult in the wilderness. Directors Benson and Moorhead also star as two brothers who return to a mysterious group of zealots they escaped from in their past. Struggling to move forward in their lives, the brothers have differing views of the cult and whilst their friends seem the same as many years ago, eerie events lead them to suspect there are still many unanswered questions.


The film sadly doesn’t live up to the trailer promise and opens poorly with an attempt to instil mystery falling flat with bland talking head interviews and a convoluted explanation of the events so far. Once the brothers arrive at the compound the film steps up a gear but spectacularly fails to provide any drama to keep the narrative pushing forward. With trees falling, a baseball apparently “floating” and a stranger repeatedly running there’s plenty of mysteries set up to explore but the Endless struggles to engage with rather dull characters and a narrative that, somewhat ironically, never gets going. As it proceeds I found my interest waning and with so little conflict or explanation, the worst state of all kicked in and I started not to care.


[Spoiler] The film’s one interesting concept is a reveal that this movie actually cross-overs with the directors’ previous film Resolution. If you are to watch the Endless then I highly recommend you catch that first. Aside from the surprise sequel concept (it’s no Split I assure you) there are some obvious circular comparisons in the visuals (a cup here, a ring fireplace there) which showed the inexperience of the directors with such weak parallels.


Whilst there were attempts to explore the truths behind the inexplicable events, I had sadly already lost interest by the final act. Comparisons to the TV show Lost were inevitable when rabbit hole story threads go down other rabbit holes, which, after a while, simply made no sense. In the end though, a great set of ideas and some admirable rich themes are completely undercut by a stale and moribund narrative and bland characters. A real missed opportunity that endlessly disappoints. 6/10



Ghost Stories (2018) Dir. Andy Nyman & Jeremy Dyson

A horror anthology with echoes of Jacob’s Ladder, Ghost Story also has a splattering of dark comedy by co-writer and co-director Jeremy Dyson from the legendary League of Gentlemen. Fellow writer-director Andy Nyman also stars as the film’s lead as a presenter who debunks psychics, but is then sent to investigate three mysterious tales by the famous 1970s supernatural sceptic who inspired him. First up is a ghostly fable involving a night watchman haunted by his daughter’s spirit, then a teenager spooked by a malevolent being in the woods and we end with a poltergeist encounter with a new-born.


The tales work well as short shockers but the film couldn’t quite work the balance of humour and horror. The appearance of comedic talents Martin Freeman and the Fast Show’s Paul Whitehouse meant the tales weren’t as terrifying as they needed to be. With a conclusion that felt more cop-out than revelatory, the whole production is well meaning but a bit meandering. Ghost Stories may supply a few charms for fans of retro UK Hammer horror but for me it would have suited TV far more than the cinema. A story of missed opportunities. 6/10


Mike Sales



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