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Review - High Rise

By midlandsmovies, Dec 16 2016 06:29PM

High-Rise (2016) Dir. Ben Wheatley


This adaptation of J.G. Ballard's High-Rise from Ben “Kill List” Wheatley is every as bit as weird as the original novel in what is a challenging yet rewarding film set in a sci-fi dystopia ripped straight from the 1970s.


Tom Hiddleston plays protagonist Dr. Robert Laing who moves into a 25th floor apartment in a tower block featuring luxurious amenities before the building (and its self-contained and insular society) begins to tear itself apart. Beginning relationships with single-mum Charlotte (a haunting turn from Sienna Miller) and becoming friends with a family on the lower level (Luke Evans and Elisabeth Moss as Richard and Helen) Laing moves between and between the opulent penthouses and paltry rooms at the bottom as the differences in wealth become an obvious reality.


With the building’s temperamental water and electricity and with garbage piling up in corridors, the microcosm pits the building’s designer Anthony Royal (Jeremy Irons) and his decadent friends against the hungry and scavenging gangs near the actual (and metaphorical) bottom as Luke Evans’ Richard Wilder puts it upon himself to assassinate Irons.


Hiddleston plays Laing with indifference and distance as he becomes our eyes, viewing the chaos as a somewhat inevitable outcome of the building’s construction.


In a whirl of hedonistic violence, disgusting torture – both mental and physical – the film shows the depravity of an unequal society with as much relevance today as it did when the book was written. Wheatley has gone for an amazing “future 70s” aesthetic with the costumes, locations having a quasi-retro feel about them more akin to Logan’s Run and A Clockwork Orange than anything modern. The building’s supermarket has a vibe straight out of the iconic Pulp “Common People” video whilst the feelings of isolation – as a whole as the building is cut off from the “real world” and as people walk on by oblivious to the building’s breakdown – are kept very much at the forefront.


Unlike most, I’ve never been a huge fan of Wheatley’s but this film shows a filmmaker with a passion and drive to deliver exactly what he intends. Luke Evans and Jeremy Irons (who’s having a movie renaissance in 2016) provide excellent support and the eclectic shots and soundtrack music (from Clint Mansell) linger long in the memory. From the illustrious images to the dark themes it explores, High-Rise is a film that bubbles up slowly from the bottom until it reaches a gloriously gory finale. Experimental but just the right side of coherent, the film explores wickedness and immorality and if you go along with its wantonness you’ll find many more highs in a slow burner building to a pinnacle of decadence.


8/10


Midlands Movies Mike

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