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Review - Captain America Civil War

By midlandsmovies, May 12 2016 07:44PM

Captain America: Civil War (2016) Dir. Anthony and Joe Russo


With the underwhelming, disappointing and chaotic Age of Ultron and the fun but ultimately inconsequential Ant-Man comes the next instalment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe as the third Captain America outing attempts to make up for a few missteps. And boy does it.


Let’s get this off the bat. At this point in the MCU, if you haven’t seen the other films (and for this one especially Iron Man, Captain America and at least one Avengers) then this movie will not make a great deal of sense for the uninitiated. That negative aside (and true of most sequels, although this is now the thirteenth entry for Marvel) Captain America: Civil War continues the darker and more realistic tone of the directors’ previous sequel from 2014.


The plot is far simpler than the messy ‘Age of Ultron’ with world governments wanting to put the reins on the Avengers who they see as an unaccountable vigilante group answerable to no one. Threatening their freedom to right wrongs they are asked to sign an accord to stop another global catastrophe (good luck with that) similar to their exploits in New York (Avengers), Sokovia (Age of Ultron) and Washington DC (Captain America: The Winter Soldier).


Whilst Tony Stark thinks this is a fair request – he feels guilt for the civilian casualties of previous battles – Steve Rogers disagrees and so begins a split in their previously rock-solid team. With Bucky Barnes (the winter soldier) being searched for after a series of terrorist atrocities, the group is torn apart and Captain protects his old friend whilst becoming a fugitive himself for his cause.


The film has a nice twist in the fact that the all-American good guy is cast as the anti-hero whilst the film goes to some dark places as his previous pal/new nemesis Tony Stark (Iron Man) is shown to struggle in his attempts to control his obsessions. With shadowy links to everyone’s past, Daniel Bruhl (from Inglorious B*sterds & Rush) is excellent as Zemo, who pulls the strings in a much more believable way than Ultron. The film should be commended for its reluctance to use a CGI/heavy-prosthetic covered villain/robot/alien and is all the better for it as the last few Marvel films have had less of a human story at their core.


Here there is a better balance of characters and their screen-time and I feel sorry for Joss Whedon who was given a tough task of following his astounding Avengers. Far too much of his sequel was used to build a world for this film. However, Whedon’s loss is our gain.


Great action sequences and moving scenes again help ground the film but an airport scrap between the two warring factions is simply “amazing” in all “senses” of the word. One of the main reasons is the first appearance of Spider-Man in this universe and my scepticism of seeing this classic character rebooted again was washed away with a great fun-filled performance from British actor Tom Holland. He brings the light-hearted joy back to the character, sitting in a zone that’s more Tobey Maguire than Andrew Garfield which was a huge plus for me.


The film also has an ‘Avengers’ vibe – the well-known characters meet for the first time and “suit up” – and the familiar faces of Black Widow and Hawkeye are joined by new-comers Ant-Man (a fun Paul Rudd) and Vision (a serious Paul Bettany) ensuring there’s still light and dark throughout.


With an ending that’s as gripping as it is meaningful, the last but not least important aspect is Chris Evans as Captain himself. Originally somewhat of a clichéd damp squib of a character – the 40s hero is a war-time stereotype – Marvel have created an absolute pivotal role for the superhero and a huge part of that is due to Evans. His honest delivery and honourable persona holds the whole piece together and whilst the action and excitement are ever-present, Evans’ superb approach creates a (narrative) freedom that Cap’ himself would be proud of.


9/10


Midlands Movies Mike

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