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Midlands Feature Review - The Inner Carriage Metaphor

By midlandsmovies, Feb 15 2016 07:43PM

The Inner Carriage Metaphor (2016) Directed by James George Oshoba & Robin Trinity


The Inner Carriage Metaphor is the title of a new narrative music video from Nottingham media student James George Oshoba. Shot as part of a second year university assignment, this experimental short is as different as anything we’ve ever been sent here at Midlands Movies.


However, the short contains a wide range of film techniques to help create a series of memorable and ambient images. We also know that all the good directors like Spike Jonze and David Fincher began their careers as music video directors so the format provides a perfect short-form platform to achieve much, but on a smaller budget. That doesn't mean it's restrictive - in fact the opposite - as creators trial more challenging subject matter than a mainstream film could do.


Experimental in concept, the film tackles themes of information overload and raises a variety of questions through symbols, images and edits. Inspiration comes via a variety of topics and emotional beliefs and the filmmaker explains that the concept as a whole refers to mystic philosopher and spiritual teacher, George Ivanovich Gurdjieff.


Spoken word, script, text and black and white video are combined to create a collage of hallucinogenic style dreamscapes. Images overlap creating an ambiguous experience for the viewer whilst there are some attempts at creating meaning between nature and technology as well as the human soul.


I enjoyed the René Magritte-esque apples and headshots whilst the superb music was not a million miles away from Hans Zimmer’s Interstellar soundtrack with piano/organ notes adding some spirituality. Albeit mixed with electronic drum loops.


The negatives? As a fan of narrative cinema I would have preferred some focus on a small “story” no matter how slight and I couldn’t care less for anything incorporating "interpretive dance" . The film’s reliance on just a black and white palette also gave it a bit of a student-y feel when a dash of colour could have enlivened the proceedings.


That said, the short intentionally keeps its meaning in the shadows and silhouettes combine with kaleidoscopic effects to create an abstract experience. Combining the conceptual with the intangible the film shows great promise for a short and although its ambient ideas were not particularly up my street, the piece could qute happily find a successful place in an art gallery as well as a music channel and that alone is something.


Find out more on

www.jamesgeorgeoshoba.tumblr.com


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